#1 shooting tip

Ninering62

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May 14, 2020
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Orig from southern Md. In North Central Florida
Haven’t read all 56 posts; so , I forgive me if it’s already been stated. In shooting the #1 BIG tip should be, DONT MISS. Now having said that, a long time ago When I was a younger fella who had just joined the military I was barked at by this old drill sergeant. His motto was look after the little things and the big things would look after themselves. To this day I truly try to follow those words which had lead me to a new motto. Fail to plan. Plan to fail. So that’s Y the #1 tip is don’t miss; and you should if you’ve looked after the little things and have planned for that shot. Just my 2c
Great post
 

nvschütze

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Aug 5, 2019
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Nevada
Move to rural Nevada so you actually can practice and polish your shooting technique. That's what I did. I moved from Northern Virginia to a tiny town in the Nevada desert somewhat east of Reno just so I'd have a place to shoot long-range. That was in Fall 2004; have loved this place ever since. Not to make anybody feel bad or to poke anybody in the eye, but I can drive less than three miles from my house and shoot 1400 yards across the dead-flat bottom of a dry lake just north of town. Places like that lake are why I moved here.

The BLM desert is thousands upon thousands of open acres with no fences, RSOs, gates, fees, hours of operation, no limits on the number of shots fired per second, no bullschumer regarding the "political color" of the rifle or magazine capacities for it. A bayonet lug and protruding pistol grip on your rifle is encouraged, and on and on. Nevada is a good State for those who own guns. As soon as we can get rid of the imposter in the Governor's Mansion in Carson City, things will get even better...
 

RockyMtnMT

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Mar 25, 2007
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Montana
What is causing drastic changes in POI when you take your bipod off?
The weight of the bipod on the rifle will change how it recoils. Not just a small change in poi but a miss on an animal at 400y. With the bipod on how it is loaded and the hardness of the surface under it will also make changes in the poi.
 

Dirtrax

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Mar 23, 2014
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Most advice seems centered around shooting groups. Nothing wrong with that. Reaching a zen state with your rifle position, calm mind, practice and dry firing are all good advice. Someone said perfect practice. Still all good. Personally I prefer Practice makes permanent. Think about it the next time you’re having a bad day and find yourself trying to force it. But when it gets to hunting things change a little.
So you have taken all this advice and your fundamentals are sound. You get up early and forego coffee thinking this will keep you calm. You hike a mile uphill thru brush and thick forest getting slapped repeatedly by snowy branches and sliding over frozen creeks. You know the elk have been where you’re headed so you brave the discomfort. Your heart is pounding from the weight of your pack and the 13lb rifle slung to you. Finally you reach the spot you have picked to set up and WHOA! A huge bull is right there in range and moving. You have seconds to shoot but have you prepared for this? Have you practiced shooting in odd positions under stress? You’re heart is racing, your hands are numb, setup has to be quick and so does the shot.
The fundamentals will carry you thru most of this, but if you haven’t fired under stress; the bull lives. You probably won’t get a second shot so what does it matter the little groups you have hung on the wall compared to having him on the wall?
Along with all the great advice and techniques afforded you consider what I incorporate in my practice as an old IPSC competitor...once you think you are in a place of confidence and competence learn to shoot under stress. I have a PACT shot timer but a stopwatch on your phone would do. One shot, cold bore. I shoot most groups now coffee’d up and under a time limit. I may run around the yard before I start. It takes some time to get a 5-10 shot group. I know what my rifle and ammo are capable of, I also know what I am capable of. Beats the hell outta boring bench shooting.
PRC may an option for you.
 

Rum Man

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Nov 2, 2017
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Well everything stated above works , has helped us in one way or the other . Some guys have the routine down to a T .
I typically get my Rifle set up and in position , check my dope , double check my level .
I seem to get excited when trying a long range shot so I need to relax and breathe.
I have no mentor, no training, im self taught and it's been Amazing !
My personal best to date is several rounds on a 36" x 36" steel plate at 3027 yards ..
I had to check my group ... 28 3/4" three Shot Group . A record ..heck no but what a thing to tell your Grandkids !

I will send out a big thanks to guys on here for the help / advice ect . To get me to this Distance !
Thanks LRH for letting me be a part of this Forum !
20200607_175534.jpg


That tan spot is my shooting place !
 

dfrahm

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Oct 3, 2012
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Wyoming
When dry-firing, put a dime on top of the end of the barrel. It should not fall off when the gun 'fires'.
 

dfrahm

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Oct 3, 2012
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Wyoming
Save your targets with all data written on them for reference later. Load data, ,temp, wind, chrono if you do it, order of shots and results. ,, ,
 

Ranger Rick

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Sep 6, 2019
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226
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Idaho
Interested to see what everyone's number one tip to shooting groups? Looking for very specific pointers or your number one thing to do when shooting. let's keep it shooting groups at 100-1200 yrds with a capable hunting rifle. Go!!
“One tip” Practice shooting from various shooting scenarios you encounter when hunting: Positions = prone, sitting, using a rock or tree, offhand. Angle of shot = level, uphill, downhill. Weather. Cold bore = one shot and two quick shots.
In sum, practice using real life hunting scenarios.
 

joseytoo

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Oct 4, 2019
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////////florida
There can be no substitute for trigger time! I personally shoot a 22 A LOT! Cheap: and it gets your form right, gives you a chance to get comfortable and build confidence in what you are capable of. Don't cost much to shoot for several hours, doesn't bother the neighbors, and it's just plain fun! When you get a 22 that shoots good, figure out what ammo it likes. Then you can try to make bug holes at 50yds. Won't be long and you will see what you are doing wrong when you pull the trigger.
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joseytoo

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Oct 4, 2019
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////////florida
That's what I consider therapy! You can't worry about a whole lot of other things when you concentrate on shooting bug holes, and you can't be too wound up and make it happen. When you do it enough you will know what you did the instant you pull the trigger. Different cheek weld, different stock pressure, different shoulder pressure -- There are a lot of mechanics that have to come together to make a good shot. It all takes practice to make sure the sequence of events are repeated every time.
 

CO_Guy

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Nov 16, 2018
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952
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CO, USA
Being consistent with my archery technique affects my shooting technique in terms of practice and staying consistent with a routine of EVERY shot. The routine has to be compact to stand up the dynamic hunting scenarios pointed out in many posts here. But for me the common thread is breath control, whether at the bench or in the field.
 

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