#1 shooting tip

JMW67

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Dec 6, 2012
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Women are some of the best shooters...why?....because they usually don't get too excited. They relax to the point of almost sleep. Men have a hard time with that. They seem to be more competitive and try too hard to shoot well, and force things. So, relax, get in good position (when possible in field conditions), do not get in a hurry even if the game (animal)..moves out....
I will agree they are much easier to teach because most have not developed bad habits like a young boy running around with his BB gun most women I have taught can now out shoot their husbands or boyfriends I know I have made alot of money off my wife at the range but now most know her and dont want to play I also believe they are more intelligent just ask one
 

ntsqd

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Upper SoKA
If my wife and my grandmother are any indication of their gender, their lower metabolism rate makes them inherently more accurate shooters. (See what I did there? LOL) Their natural state at rest is steadier than mine is, for sure.

I don't like or want the shot to surprise me. Maybe that is contrary to all marksmanship training (I've no idea), but I want to know exactly when the shot is going to break so that I can control when that happens vs. when the sights & target are aligned.
 

Springtom

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Paso Robles
If my wife and my grandmother are any indication of their gender, their lower metabolism rate makes them inherently more accurate shooters. (See what I did there? LOL) Their natural state at rest is steadier than mine is, for sure.

I don't like or want the shot to surprise me. Maybe that is contrary to all marksmanship training (I've no idea), but I want to know exactly when the shot is going to break so that I can control when that happens vs. when the sights & target are aligned.
I agree with you on both counts. I guess what I mean about the surprise break is more of a philosophy about not anticipating the shot. Easier to explain to beginners as a "surprise". Obviously one gains a much more intuitive approach over the years, after many many experiences in the memory bank. Many of us take this intuition for granted. I know I sure do.
 

djfergus

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Dec 25, 2015
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Follow through with your shot, meaning you keep looking down the scope and not move your face away trying to see where you hit. Thats what spotters are for.

From a bench, tripod, shooting sticks or off hand you can practice by dry firing with a fired case or snap cap, you'll see if you are getting of target or not. You'll notice If you jerk the trigger, close your eyes, look away or flinch, you will aee some weird stuff and ask yourself, why the heck did I just do that.

Hope this helps and stay safe
All of what you said helps me more than anything. I dry fire about three times on the target before starting a shooting session. Staying down, following through, looking through the scope after the shot is made.
 

Aggie1999

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Dec 14, 2019
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Texas
I'm now curious how many keep there bolt out of there rifle when storing and why? I've forgotten my ammo box on my bench before!
I keep some of my bolts 8n my cabinet and the rifles in another closet. Too many rifles for my cabinet. I know there are other solutions (bigger safe), but don't have a closet big enough for a larger safe. This way, even if one of the kids does grab the rifle out of the closet, it is nothing more than a club. Of course, he'll be missing range time after that (all guns will be off limits), so he has told me he will never do that.
 

LVJ76

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All of what you said helps me more than anything. I dry fire about three times on the target before starting a shooting session. Staying down, following through, looking through the scope after the shot is made.
It definitely does help and more than many shooters think.

My uncle was a huge fan of dry firing and got me on it when I was a kid. The issue when shooting silhouette offhand is that you need to be able to call your shots to make windage and elevation corrections, without the proper follow through you just can't call them.

Of course now there are kestrels and ballistics apps but not 25 years ago. Regardless of all the new cool gadjets following through on every shot is still important, and maybe the most important part of the shot, at least for me, especially when shooting at a living animal. It just tells you so much that an app or spotter cant.

Stay safe
 

Tech4

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Jan 1, 2020
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Greene NY
If my wife and my grandmother are any indication of their gender, their lower metabolism rate makes them inherently more accurate shooters. (See what I did there? LOL) Their natural state at rest is steadier than mine is, for sure.

I don't like or want the shot to surprise me. Maybe that is contrary to all marksmanship training (I've no idea), but I want to know exactly when the shot is going to break so that I can control when that happens vs. when the sights & target are aligned.
I think the surprise is more for a bow. If you are surprised when your trigger brakes on a rifle you need more trigger time after all mastering the trigger is the most important thing to marksmanship.
 

mpk1996

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Oct 24, 2010
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Have good data for your rifle/ammo, to include a good zero. And that doesn't mean whats on the box. or plugging the number you got from your chrono with a BC from some other place. Those are only places to start. you have to actually shoot your rifle at distance and true up your ballistics calc.

I see it all the time, guys not having any idea how their rifle shoots at distance or their zero is off.

you can have the best trigger squeeze and fundamentals in the world, but if your data is off you ain't gona hit sh!t!
 

Eagel Builder

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Feb 28, 2020
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San Diego Ca
Dry firing can damage the firing pin on some guns. Have change firing pins on H& R rifles and shot guns ,single shots. Broken pin. Using snap caps or a verified spent case .
 
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