1 MOA: 1" = 95.5 Yards

Laguna Freak

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We just had a lengthy discussion of MOA vs Mil and this was posted:

Just a minute (of angle)...


He points out why the math is easier with fewer steps in almost all scenarios using MOA.
Besides all that, I ain’t converting to metric for the simple joy of p!ssing off all of the globalists. Just sayin’... Popcorn anyone? 😜
 
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gregsjt

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Mils is not metric, if you think that you don't understand MOA or Mils. 1 mil equals 1 yard at 1000 yards.
 

sea2summit

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Mils is not metric, if you think that you don't understand MOA or Mils. 1 mil equals 1 yard at 1000 yards.
That’s weird because a MIL is 10cm at 100m and 1m at 1,000m. Maybe that’s just random.

But both are simple angular measurements that happen to be useful for ballistic applications.
 

gregsjt

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That’s weird because a MIL is 10cm at 100m and 1m at 1,000m. Maybe that’s just random.

But both are simple angular measurements that happen to be useful for ballistic applications.
It works well with metric because metric is a base 10 system but that doesn't mean Mils is metric, it's an angular measurement. Like I said above, 1 mil is 1 yard at 1000 yards, 1 mil is 1 foot at 1000 feet, it's also 1 meter at 1000 meters. It doesn't really matter what linear system you are using it's always 1/1000 of whatever the range is.

Regardless if you are using Mils or MOA you shouldn't be concerned about inches, feet, centimeters, or any other linear measurement, once you have a range everything should be called or adjusted in MOA or Mils.
 

dragon798

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It works well with metric because metric is a base 10 system but that doesn't mean Mils is metric, it's an angular measurement. Like I said above, 1 mil is 1 yard at 1000 yards, 1 mil is 1 foot at 1000 feet, it's also 1 meter at 1000 meters. It doesn't really matter what linear system you are using it's always 1/1000 of whatever the range is.

Regardless if you are using Mils or MOA you shouldn't be concerned about inches, feet, centimeters, or any other linear measurement, once you have a range everything should be called or adjusted in MOA or Mils.
I can't believe it took 3 pages of discussion for someone to finally state what mils actually are. Thank you
 

jdavistx

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My son who is a math professor went through the MOA calculation. With the angle, and cosign of the angle.
He proved to me: the 1" we all use as a standard is really @ 95.5 yards, not 100 yards.
And if we shoot at 100 yards, it's slightly over an inch.

Tan 1/60 = x/3600"

and going out to 1000 yards is where it starts to show..
Correct. 100/95.5 = 1.047". 1000 yards = 10.47" As a practical matter 0.47" at 1000 yards is way down on my priority list of things to do. The trig is correct... but it doesn't matter to me in the real world. Better to read the wind correctly as an example.

If you actually shoot 0.25 MOA in a rifle or similar due to environmental and physical conditions, repeatability, cartridge etc, that's 2.6" @1000 yards. The MOA differential between a 1 vs 1.047 adds 0.47" to that. So as practical matter in the field, I use 1" in my head. It's 1/2/ inch @1000YDS or 2.6" vs a 3.1".

I shoot MOA. Why? Mils have become more popular mostly because the math is somewhat easier if you use meters, but MOA gives better resolution. 1 MOA is 1.047" at 100 yards and 1 miliradian is 3.6" at 100 yards as established. That's why good mil scopes have 10 clicks/mil vs 4 clicks/MOA. 1 click translates to .36"/100 yards in 1/10 miliradian increments or .26"/100 yards in 1/4 MOA increments. Therefore, 1/4 MOA is more accurate than 1/10 miliradian by ~32%. For me, while making a shot I'd rather click twice rather than 5 times with 32% more inherent accuracy.

But now I'm into religion, tall grass and maybe even metaphysics. :)
 

Dog Rocket

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Correct. 100/95.5 = 1.047". 1000 yards = 10.47" As a practical matter 0.47" at 1000 yards is way down on my priority list of things to do. The trig is correct... but it doesn't matter to me in the real world. Better to read the wind correctly as an example.

If you actually shoot 0.25 MOA in a rifle or similar due to environmental and physical conditions, repeatability, cartridge etc, that's 2.6" @1000 yards. The MOA differential between a 1 vs 1.047 adds 0.47" to that. So as practical matter in the field, I use 1" in my head. It's 1/2/ inch @1000YDS or 2.6" vs a 3.1".

I shoot MOA. Why? Mils have become more popular mostly because the math is somewhat easier if you use meters, but MOA gives better resolution. 1 MOA is 1.047" at 100 yards and 1 miliradian is 3.6" at 100 yards as established. That's why good mil scopes have 10 clicks/mil vs 4 clicks/MOA. 1 click translates to .36"/100 yards in 1/10 miliradian increments or .26"/100 yards in 1/4 MOA increments. Therefore, 1/4 MOA is more accurate than 1/10 miliradian by ~32%. For me, while making a shot I'd rather click twice rather than 5 times with 32% more inherent accuracy.

But now I'm into religion, tall grass and maybe even metaphysics. :)
1) MIL math is easier if you stop trying to convert from inches in the first place. (Especially if you are trying to dope wind)

2) MOA is finer by 0.1 inches per click...so 1 inch at 1000 yards. In a worse case scenario, your firing solution falls exactly mid-way between clicks...so MOA in practical terms is 0.5 inches finer at 1000 yards.
 

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