Outdoorsmans Rifle Chassis System Review

The Kitchen Table Gunsmith
Real gunsmiths call guys like me “coffee table gunsmiths”, meaning I know just enough to get myself into trouble! But with an out-of-the-box Remington 700 ADL, I have all the skill necessary to assemble a complete rifle with the Outdoorsmans Chassis System, and here is the visual proof in photos. By the way, in case you were wondering, the following photos were taken in my kitchen and all the work was performed on my kitchen table.

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This Remington 700 ADL is chambered in .243 and comes from the factory with a 24” barrel.


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Remove the action and trigger guard screws. I highly recommend you get a Tipton Gun Vise; you will never regret this purchase.


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Remove the action and magazine spring and follower.


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Attach the butt stock to the Outdoorsmans Chassis System. Getting the stock to index properly will take some trial and error, so take your time and get it straight.


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Insert the barreled action and magazine spring into the chassis.


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Replace the old action screws with the provided titanium screws. Due to the inherent properties of titanium and aluminum, you should use a dab of included anti-seize lubrication.


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Tighten down action screws, preferably with a torque wrench like the Wheeler Fat Wrench, with 50 lbs. on the front screw and 40 lbs. on the back screw.


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There are multiple folding stock adapters on the market. Ask the guys at the Outdoorsmans which ones they would recommend.


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With the attached adapter plate, you can mount your rifle directly to any of the Outdoorsmans tripod heads.


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Up to three Picatinny accessory rails can be mounted on the forend for sling attachment, bipod, laser sight, or illumination devices.