Wyoming 6 point Bull Elk 750 yards 300 gr Berger

Discussion in 'Elk Hunting' started by D.Camilleri, Nov 3, 2013.

  1. D.Camilleri

    D.Camilleri Well-Known Member

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    Well my November elk hunt finally got here. I left home Thursday afternoon with hope of getting some time scouting. Well that didn't happen! One hundred yards from where I wanted to camp and the frozen ground had thawed and the mud was tenacious. I was towing my 30' fifth wheel with my horse trailer loaded with two horses behind it when I went down the road headed to my preferred camp site. Part way up the slight hill with mud flying everywhere, forward progress halted. I went down and unloaded the horses and then unhooked the horse trailer. I then unleashed 500 horsepower from the mighty duramax and got the whole setup within 100 feet of where I wanted to camp. Unfortunately I couldn't get the back tires of the truck up over the ditch on the side of the road. Good time to try out the new milemarker hydraulic winch. Tree number 1 was at the wrong angle and the truck just keep going sideways the wrong way. I picked a new dead tree that was in a better spot, and the winch promptly pulled the tree out of the ground. Third time was a charm and found another stump that held tight. Finally after over an hour, I have a camp. No time to scout.

    Opening morning my friend and I headed to a spot I had seen some bulls the last time I had this tag. We parked our atv's, looked to the east and saw about 300 head of elk skylined two ridges over. Most cows and small bulls. We walked in about 3/4 of a mile on a closed logging road that had 18 inches of snow on it. Oh yeah, forgot the snow shoes. We got to a vantage point and my buddy spotted a bull skylined on a far ridge. Too small. Then I spotted two 6 point bulls the next drainage over covering ground, one was a very big bodied bull, but I couldn't judge how big due to the distance, probably over 1500 yards. We made our way down the logging road into some dark timber and spotted another 6 point bull. I looked him over and my buddy said you should take him. I ranged him right at 700 yards and went to dial my scope and he decided to leave, no shot. I was hoping for the next size up as this bull was probably about a 310 bull, but oh well. We continued to hunt and glass and saw one bull that we think we watched bed up move through the dark timber, no shot. On our way back to the atv's we busted a big bull from his bed in the dark timber. I was too tired to follow after him in the deep snow.

    We decide there were lots of bulls in here and I would come back on Saturday. My friend went home and took my atv with him, so I had to make the three mile drive in my truck. The road was much better in the morning due to the mud being mostly frozen and the snow covered areas weren't too bad for someone to lazy to use chains, so I just used good tires and horsepower.

    I made it to a nob and started glassing the open hillsides. In the first few seconds I spotted a bull feeding. I cranked the scope up to 32 power and focused it. 6 point bull. Then I glassed some more, another 6 point bull one hundred yards to the left of the first one. A bigger 6 point bull. Out came the rangefinder and it told me 750 yards. I have been practicing for this shot all summer, so why not. I set up my shooting sticks (no way to get prone) and after adjusting them several times due to the deep snow, I finally had a sight picture. I felt good and after dialing my scope I let a 300 gr Berger go sailing from my 338 RUM. I heard a distinctive WHAAP through my game ear and watched the bull hump up. Ut oh, maybe a gut shot. I chambered a second shell and let fly and this time I heard a very loud impact. Both bulls ran towards the bottom of the ravine. I started my walk towards where I last saw the bull and looked up at the top of the ridge just in time to see another big 6 point bull crest the ridge and go out of sight.

    I finally made it over to where I first shot at the bull, after crossing several sets of Wolf tracks in the snow. I looked around for blood and didn't see any. I was on a slope that was clear from snow. Then I looked below me about 20 yards and sure enough, blood and lots of it. I moved down and next to the blood I found some pieces of bone and a ball joint from a lower shoulder laying on the ground. My bull was right below piled up twenty five yards from where I first shot him.

    I quartered him out and drug the quarters away from the carcass to a spot that would be easier to load my horse and also to make sure a griz wasn't on top of it when I came back. One shot broke the bulls lower shoulder and leg with the bullet taking out a chunk of the lower sternum, but not entering the boiler room. The other shot I finally found, exited a bit farther back than I would have liked, but the bullet was right under the hide and it passed though the stomach. I am not sure where it entered, because I didn't peel back the hide that far on the opposite side. I found a 3/4 inch diameter piece of bullet with another 1/4 x 5/8's long piece of jacket right next to it.

    I went back to camp, got my horses and packed out my meat (this part would make another good story, but lets just say that my big gelding's maiden trip of packing elk didn't go off without a hitch. Oh well, I made it back to camp before dark (barely) and I made my longest shot of my life on a nice trophy.
     

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  2. trebark

    trebark Well-Known Member

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    Great write up and nice elk. How about some pics of the rifle.
     

  3. Tikkamike

    Tikkamike Well-Known Member

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    Very cool! ill be up there in 5 days! nice shot and nice bull
     
  4. marioq

    marioq Well-Known Member

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    Almost suns too good to be true!!!! Awesome job and good story
     
  5. MMERSS

    MMERSS Well-Known Member

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    Very well done! Nothing like the sound of a 300gr impact.:D Congrats.
     
  6. SBruce

    SBruce Well-Known Member

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    Sounds like a very exciting hunt, in more ways than one!:)

    Congratulations on a very nice shot. 750 is a long ways from a sitting position with buffalo sticks.

    Thanks for the story and Congratulations again..........Well Done!

    I'd like to hear the gelding episode too if/when you get a chance. Couple of our horses are trained to shoot off of, but they've never packed any meat.
     
  7. jmden

    jmden Well-Known Member

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    Nice job! That's great!
     
  8. D.Camilleri

    D.Camilleri Well-Known Member

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    Now, for the rest of the story. After I got back to camp with the horns, I was beat from quartering and packing the meat a safe distance from the carcass to lessen my chances of an encounter with a griz or at least with him having all the advantage. So, I crawled into bed and took a 30 minute power nap. I woke up and saddled my mustang mare and put a pack saddle and some saddle panniers on my wife's giant gelding. I don't like riding him because it is just to damn hard to get up that high without a big rock to use as a step. So I had a plan to ride the horses up the drainage to my elk, load it up and back I come all done in two hours. Wishful thinking. So the first half mile up the drainage went well until I saw a bottle neck that I didn't remember. Hmmm, me forget, oh well. So it appeared the best thing to do was to lead the horses up a steep side hill. Did I mention that I took off my hiking boots and put on my low traction riding boots? So my mare is all lathered up and I am leading the two of them up and through nasty crap trying to remember why I came this way. At times, the horses looked like big horn sheep traversing rocks and such. Well, we finally got out of the crappy side hill and made it to the open slope that I shot the elk on. A check with the gps and only 500 feet to go. Hmmm, I was supposed to be riding my horse all this way and not hiking again, water, I don't need no stinking water, damn a beer would taste good about now. So, I make it to the elk quarters, talking loudly to make sure I don't surprise a griz and good news I don't need to spend any 300 grain nosler partitions out of the 454 casul. I load the quarters on to the big gelding "Frank" and all was well, he didn't seem to mind. The quarters still had the lower legs on them because I didn't want to expend the energy to saw them off. I noticed the hooves from the quarters were a little close to Frank's back side (not smart) I attempted to get in the saddle on my mare and she wasn't co-operating so I decided to lead them both for a couple hundred yards to head into the next drainage to go down. I got about 10 feet and one of those scary hooves touched Frank's hind end and the rodeo was on. He bucked round and round with me hanging on to the lead rope until the saddle pannier ripped on one side and two quarters fell out. He won. So, I tied him up again and assessed the damage. The pack saddle was all out of place from him being so sweated up and then the weight on one side moved it out of wack, so I unloaded everything and cut off the lower legs. Then I loaded everything back in paying careful attention not to let any part of the elk legs hit Frank's hind end. I strapped everything together as tight as I could, got in the saddle and rode into the next drainage. Why didn't I come up this way you dumb ass? This was a lot better or so I thought as I was riding my mare down a pretty good slope and noticing she was running out of ground clearance due to the depth of the snow drifts. Down to here knees and back up, yee haw! I was able to pick my way through the dead falls and with the exception of my mare wanting to go straight down and me wanting her to take a good trail, with snow on it (I won) we made it back to the main two track road where I noticed Frank's saddle blanket was almost out from under the pack saddle, oh well only a 1/4 mile more to go. We made it to camp and I unload the meat and WTF only 3 quarters, somewhere in the last two miles I lost a shoulder and not the one with a big bullet hole either, it was the good shoulder. Not having a clue where to look for the shoulder, it is my contribution to the wolves or bears in the area so they don't go hungry tonight.
     
  9. jmden

    jmden Well-Known Member

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    That's funny...now...not then, I'm sure. Anyway...made me laugh. Thanks. :D
     
  10. D.Camilleri

    D.Camilleri Well-Known Member

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    Recovered 300 gr 338 Berger OTM. Bullet entered behind the shoulder and was recovered under the hide on the off side after passing through the stomach. 2nd bullet was not recovered.
     

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  11. Tikkamike

    Tikkamike Well-Known Member

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    Those are some pretty ivories
     
  12. royinidaho

    royinidaho Writers Guild

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    Sorry for the loss of the shoulder....

    Horses!

    Horses give me the vapors!!!!

    Every horse that ever bucked under me landed me on various parts of my anatomy. Only once on my feet.

    Funny, I was just searching the web for a mule.:rolleyes:
     
  13. D.Camilleri

    D.Camilleri Well-Known Member

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    I have a hunting partner that loves mules and he has a bunch of them. The only problem I see with that is every time I ask him about a mule, he tells me that one kicked him and he is gone. When we were deer hunting the mule he was riding could get rid of a rider just by spinning. And he wanted me to ride one of his mules because my mare was tired. I don't bounce too well any more and I am happy to say I have only been bucked off once, the other times I just jumped.