working up a hot load question

Discussion in 'Reloading' started by moosehead7, Aug 14, 2013.

  1. moosehead7

    moosehead7 Member

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    Ok I have a 300 weatherby with a 24 inch barrel, the manual says max load is 84.5 for the bullet and weight I have chosen, I want to see how much more I can go above before the bolt gets sticks, or the primers flatten out. So starting at the low end load what grain increments sould I keep increasing it by until the sticky bolt. Thanks.
     
  2. RT2506

    RT2506 Well-Known Member

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    Once you get to a sticky bolt you are already WAY OVER PRESSURE. My suggestion is that you stick with loads between the start and max suggested by the powder and bullet company that you are using and search for accuracy. Another 25 to 50 fps will not really help you any but the pressure that it takes to get that can harm you and your weapon. It will shorten your case life greatly also. The 300 WM is already running on the ragged edge with max loads.
     

  3. Lefty7mmstw

    Lefty7mmstw Well-Known Member

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    +1
    If you need extra speed don't try to beat up your weapon, but get a bigger caliber. You'd have to go to 300 rum or 30-378 if you are already on the 30 roy.
    I've strain gauged my old stw at 75Kpsi and the bolt wasn't even sticky yet. You are talking 80kpsi + peak to start getting sticky with most actions. I'm not going there and I wouldn't go there either if I were you.
     
  4. MudRunner2005

    MudRunner2005 Well-Known Member

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    If you need more speed and power than a .300 Wby, you should jump up to the .30-378 Wby.

    But I can't imagine on N. America what would be so difficult to kill that a .300 Wby can't cut it...
     
  5. boomtube

    boomtube Well-Known Member

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    "I want to see how much more I can go above before the bolt gets sticks, or the primers flatten out."

    No offense intended but anyone asking such a question is far too inexperienced to be trying that. For one thing, primers are very poor indicators of anything useful and if you don't know that you don't even have way to start pushing the envelop, even if there were any value in doing so.
     
  6. lloydsmale

    lloydsmale Well-Known Member

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    youve been given good advice. Now take it.
     
  7. moosehead7

    moosehead7 Member

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    Would you please tell me some other pressure indacators then.
     
  8. boomtube

    boomtube Well-Known Member

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    No. IF there were any easy to explain and certain to use ways to do so, every manual printed would list the ways. They don't because it's neither easy nor does pushing the envelop do anything worthwhile.

    The occasional noob's desire to "reload" some super concoction that beats everyone else is a grass pipe dream. I asked an old guy how to reload as hot as possible nearly 50 years ago. He looked at me like the idiot I was and said, "keep adding a half grain at a time until she blows, then back off a half grain"... I got the message, I hope you do.

    Stick with what your loading manuals suggest, that's plenty 'hot' enough for any practical needs.
     
  9. 270Weatherby

    270Weatherby Well-Known Member

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    +2 on all the advice... BUT what's up with every new manual being more conservative than the previous. I have a manual that has 300 Wby 200gr bullet @ 83 gr max 7828... another one maxes @ 74gr! What do I trust? Same nosler info just 10 yrs difference in data
     
  10. Lefty7mmstw

    Lefty7mmstw Well-Known Member

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    Mostly different guy behind the rifle or better pressure measuring. Component variations account for some charge spread too. I'm seeing fewer dangerous combo's these days than in older manuals though.
    There's still a good amount of hotter stuff out there . Check out Lyman's data for a 140 gr. in the 7stw with dang near any powder, but especially rl22. I had rather stout pressures at 77 grains with a 140 in my rifle, they go to 82 grains with a 140, or exactly what charge I use with rl25. Hell, hornady stops at 74.1 grains rl22 with a 140; Tha's a lot more spread than different bullet constructions will produce. Both are current manuals.

    Was the drop for your roy in manual #7?? Both # 4 and #6 show 83gr. top end for your roy combo.
    Btw., the roy rounds did come in under saami guidelines in '96 if I remember correctly, and saami won't let cal's over 65Kpsi currently. I know I've seen Lazz. stuff over that and the lapua improved runs a bit over 65kpsi if I'm not mistaken. It is a good sensible top end though as you aren't beating the snot out of everything and you have a bit of headroom for temp change or a bit of dirt in the barrel, etc..
     
  11. lloydsmale

    lloydsmale Well-Known Member

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    theres somethings in loading youve just got to learn for yourself. NOBODY here is going to give you hot loads or recomendations on how to approach them. It just to dangerous and could get you and the poster in big trouble. For a beginning handloader my recomendation would be to buy two or three loading manuals and use the most conservitive top load out of the three. Start with a starting load and work up to the books max. I once bought a 264 ruger that had a barrel problem right out of the box and would actually blow primers right out of the case with max loads out of one of my manuals. ruger replaced that barrel but it just goes to show you that if i would have took recomendations for hot loads off the net i might have had a bomb on my hands.
     
  12. 270Weatherby

    270Weatherby Well-Known Member

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  13. TOM H

    TOM H Well-Known Member

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  14. mrultramag

    mrultramag Well-Known Member

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    Take a good look at several sources of reloading data. Look at the length of bbl they are using and look at what they get for velocity. if your bbl is 24" and the data used a 26" subtract 25 fps for each inch. Get a good chronograph and set it up 15-20 ft out in front of the gun. Then start low and work up in charge wt slowly... watching your velocity and looking out for any obvious pressure signs. Hopefully you'll reach the kind of velocity they are getting in the books without pressure signs first. stop if you get any noticeable pressure signs. If you make it there; you have reached the safe potential of the cartridge. going any further to get additional fps without laboratory pressure equipment is an excersise in stupidity. nirvana comes when you are getting close to the safe potential of the cartridge and accuracy is good also.