who polishes inside of thier necks?

Discussion in 'Reloading' started by 30-06 boy, May 18, 2008.

  1. 30-06 boy

    30-06 boy Well-Known Member

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    light bulblight bulblight bulbi once was visiting a fellow benchrest shooters home and saw him cleaning/polishing the inside of his case necks with steel wool wrapped around a bronze bore brush.never really thought about that untill the other day.i looked at the inside surface condition of my case necks under a microscope.interesting to say the least.they look like they were sandblasted with little tiny imperfections in the surface.so i chucked a old bronze brush in a drill wrapped some fine steel wool ariund it and polished the inside of a neck.checked again under microscope.smooth wall surface.now i see why this fellow was doing this,to get consistant bullet pull from each case from shot to shot.does any one else do this ?jason:Dlight bulb
     
  2. Boss Hoss

    Boss Hoss Well-Known Member

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    IMHO pretty much a waste of time. The inside of my necks get polished by a certain extent by the mandrel that goes into the neck during turning operations.

    Doing that by hand only invites inconsistency, which is bad JUJU for accuracy.
     

  3. woods

    woods Well-Known Member

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    Mandrels from turning can leave lots of ridges and burrs

    [​IMG]

    I polish the inside of the necks with steel wool but use a Lee Zip Trim, easier to get a tight fit on the steel wool and hold the case without hand fatigue

    [​IMG]

    By leaving a larger diameter of steel wool you can also take the burrs off the inside and outside neck chamfers.

    Does it make a difference? Who knows? I use the Lee Collet so I don't have any lube in the neck and the necks come out pretty clean

    [​IMG]
     
  4. Winchester 69

    Winchester 69 Well-Known Member

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    Many just manually run the brass over a brush, bronze or nylon, to knock out burned powder residue. Do what suits your needs.
    .
     
  5. royinidaho

    royinidaho Writers Guild

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    For my needs I just hit the necks w/ nylon brush in a drill motor.
     
  6. Charles B

    Charles B Well-Known Member

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    I give them a good brushing. Seating resistance seems to be more uniform.
     
  7. sjadventures

    sjadventures Well-Known Member

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    I just brush mine out.
     
  8. Kevin Cram

    Kevin Cram <b>SPONSOR</b>

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    You should at a minimum be running a old cleaning brush down the neck before they ever get run into a die. The steel wool will not give inconsistencies, unless you kept polishing it for while and it got extremely hot. I wrap steel wool on a old brush chuckedin a cordless screw gun and run it in and out of my case neck 3-4 times and it polishes them up very nicely. You will deffinately notice a difference in seating pressure too. The carbon fouling is extremely hard and will actually damage your die. Although the button can be replaced, the rest of the die will be scratched and leave vertical lines on your case necks when resizing if you don't also clean off the little bit of residue that is on the outside of your necks.
     
  9. 30-06 boy

    30-06 boy Well-Known Member

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    i do run a bronze brush through my necks before sizing them,but i do believe the polishing will add to shot to shot consistency.gun):D
     
  10. LRHWAL

    LRHWAL Well-Known Member

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    I posted a question on this a while back as I found that with ultrasonic cleaning the finish was a bit inconsistent around the full diameter of the neck internally afterwards. Some parts would have more carbon residue remaining than others.

    I now clean with a bronze bore brush manually dipped in a bit of benzine - cleans it up well and leaves a finish that is (to the naked eye anyway) consistent. Dries quickly too.

    Zediker deals with this in his book and suggested steering clear of chucking anything into a drill as I recall. I'd be happy with a few seconds with a cordless screwdriver or something though. That said I'd do whatever makes my neck finish look consistent right around and down to bare metal - I don't think a polished appearance is needed.