Which press?

Discussion in 'Reloading' started by Coues Sniper, Mar 4, 2008.

  1. Coues Sniper

    Coues Sniper Well-Known Member

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    I'm finally getting into reloading, and the first thing on my list to buy is a press. What would you recommend? I'd like to buy a good one up front rather than a decent one and then wished i had bought a different one or upgrade later. I will be reloading for a 300 RUM all the way down to a 22-250, with the possibility of a 338 or something in the future. I don't really shoot pistols much. I was looking at the Forster or the RCBS Rockchucker... good idea? Thanks guys.

    Kevin
     
    Last edited: Mar 4, 2008

  2. ss7mm

    ss7mm Writers Guild

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    I've got a couple of RockChucker presses and have never felt the need for anything else.;)

    Others use different presses and are happy with them as well. Kinda like Ford and Chevy........although I drive a Toyota.:rolleyes:
     

  3. James Jones

    James Jones Well-Known Member

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    The big RCBS , Redding presses are good as are some others ,I personaly like the Forster/Bonanza Co-Ax press.
     
  4. Tyler Kemp

    Tyler Kemp SPONSOR

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    I got into reloading last year and my Lee Classic Cast Turret has done fine. No flexing and it turns out accurate loads. Resizes easy. A 3 hole press would be better for some dies, some of my locking rings are too big to be used right next to each other because of either the hole spacing or the locking rings.
     
  5. boomtube

    boomtube Well-Known Member

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    I have a Rock Chucker II. It's strong but that's about all I can say for it. It spills and spits spent primers like crazy, so bad I got another press with a better decap system and use a universal decapper for that rather than using the RC. The RC lever is ok but not exactly the angle or length I would like. But it's strong. :) I have an old Lyman turret press that's pretty good but I rarely use it, I prefer single stage presses due to the better stiffness.

    If I had to replace my RC tomorrow, I'd get a Lee Classic Cast (iron). It's spent primer catcher system works pretty well, the lever is adjustable for length and angle, it's probably even stronger and the opening is larger than my RC. And it's all made in the US, while the RCs are now cast in China.

    If my money were unlimited, which it is, I would like to have a Forster Co-ax or Redding Ultramag but I really don't think either would improve my ammunition. Good ammo comes from good work methods, not auto-magic expensive tools.

    (Tyler - there has to be some slack in that turret or it couldn't rotate!)
     
    Last edited: Mar 4, 2008
  6. Winchester 69

    Winchester 69 Well-Known Member

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    Forster or Redding.

    Choose the one that most appeals to you and meets your needs.
     
  7. overbore

    overbore Well-Known Member

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    Press

    Sir, more mass in cast iron is best; but, having said that, the Marksmanship units of the military use the Co-Ax 2 for a good reason. I happen to have purchased a Pacific Pro- O circa 1968. It still turns out accurate rounds with no sign of wear. Overbore
     
  8. Moman

    Moman Well-Known Member

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    I've got the Rock Chucker and it's been a great press. Mine is about 17 years old, the newer ones may not be as good???
     
  9. devildoc

    devildoc Well-Known Member

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    Well my next press will be a Lee classic cast, it has a larger window and ram travel that will make loading the big magnums alot easier. I've heard nothing but good things about them from people that have em, and it's only $70!
     
  10. Coues Sniper

    Coues Sniper Well-Known Member

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    I hear you Dick. Thanks.

    I'm sure there is a lot of truth to that, but it's fun to have nice toys ;)
     
  11. infantrytrophy

    infantrytrophy Member

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    Another vote for Forster

    :) The Forster Co-Ax press has served me well. A very substantial press, it is capable of handling heavier-duty work as well as the smaller calibers like .223 or .22-250.

    It is a little different from other presses. For one thing, the die is installed by inserting the previously tightened lock ring into a milled slot, instead of screwing the die into the press and then tightening the lock ring. This allows very quick die changes without moving the lock ring. You can remove the die and re-install it quickly without having to re-adjust the die (This is a BIG advantage). Also, this arrangement allows the die to "float" slightly in the horizontal plane while remaining rigidly held along the vertical axis.

    A second design feature is the closed system for capturing the spent primer. The primer drops into a tube directly feeding into a closed storage cup. No messy and lead-laden primer residue can accumulate on or around the press.

    Finally, there is a universal shell holder with spring-loaded jaws holding the brass case. When adjusted properly, these jaws hold the case while allowing slight "float" in the horizontal plane. This feature, along with a similar feature for the die mentioned above, is good for concentric sizing and bullet seating operations. If desired, a coventional shellholder adapter plate is available for use with standard shell holders.

    Forster's tech support is very good. One of their reps patiently talked me through the setup. All of the information was in the instruction sheets, of course, but I neglected to read it thoroughly.

    Good luck with your choice.
     
  12. vonb

    vonb Member

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    I have a Co-Ax and a Lee Classic Cast single stage. They are both excellent presses. The Forster is more svelte in its linkage and movement out of the box. The Lee seems to be made like a brute that has slicked up after some use. If I had to go with one, it would be the Forster due to way it holds the case and the ability to change dies quickly.
     
  13. 284stak

    284stak Well-Known Member

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    I like the turret presses. Reddings more so than the RCBS. It is nice to not have to pull dies for each step.
     
  14. anachronism

    anachronism Well-Known Member

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    I have a Redding. One press I cannot recommend is Hornady. They make a decent press, but when the two I had wore out, Hornady wouldn't stand behind them. Buy from someone who thinks enough of their product to offer a lifetime warranty. LEE is okay if you have to pinch pennies, but their warranty isn't anything to be proud of either. When I was looking to replace my last Hornady, the two finalists were Redding & RCBS.