Which 6.5mm Bullet for LR varmint?

Discussion in 'Varmint Hunting' started by jquin, Mar 28, 2011.

  1. jquin

    jquin New Member

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    Nov 6, 2003
    Hi All
    I have a 6.5x47L and am looking for a long range varmint load
    I have done some work in this area already and I have worked up loads for the following.

    85gr Sierra
    100gr Nosler B/Tip
    130gr Berger

    Obviously the sierra is the best varmint pill and the berger the best at long range however I'd like to heard what others are using.

    I know the 95gr V-max is another one but no one seems to stock it reliably on this side of the planet. *sigh*
     
  2. WildRose

    WildRose Well-Known Member

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    Hard to beat the 123gr Laupa Scenar all the way around from small varmints up to deer size game.

    http://www.lapua.com/en/products/reloading/bullets/centerfire-rifle-bullets/8

    Loded right you get the best combination of velocity and flat trajectory in the 120-130gr range.

    129gr Hornady SST is another good choice.

    Hornady Manufacturing Company :: Bullets :: Rifle :: Choose by Caliber :: .264 6.5mm :: 6.5mm .264 129 gr SST®

    If maximum velocity is more important you can look at the 95gr V max as well.

    Hornady Manufacturing Company :: Bullets :: Rifle :: Choose by Caliber :: .264 6.5mm :: 6.5mm .264 95 gr V-MAX™

    You are giving up some velocity with the higher weight bullets, but you are also getting a higher BC which is very important when you get beyond 500yds, or are fighing cross winds.

    I learned about 30 years ago though that more often than not maximum velocity didn't produce anything but higher velocities and less precision.

    Most guns will shoot better with bullets in the midrange of their caliber and at less than suggested Max velocities.

    Each bbl though is a different.

    Of what you have listed I'd say the 100gr Nosler BT should give excellent performance all the way around, but, again, it's up to your bbl/chamber.
     
    Last edited: Mar 28, 2011

  3. MrMajestic

    MrMajestic Well-Known Member

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    If the 123/140 grain A-Max is like the other diameters it will serve you well. I have destroyed lots of chucks with the .30/168 and 7MM/162 grain slugs. They are not constructed very heavy and why they are preferred for longish ranges. My 6.5X47 build is about done and they will be my first choice, if accurate, for varmints and distant cervids.
     
    Last edited: Apr 8, 2011
  4. jdefranc938

    jdefranc938 Active Member

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    If you don't mind, what was your work-up for the 85 and 100 grainers? I am having my 6.5x47L built now and looking for possibilities in all billet varieties. Thanks in advance!
     
  5. Gobber

    Gobber New Member

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    I wish Barnes would produce a Varmint Grenade in 264.

    I have had great results with the 95gr. VMax and 123gr SST in my AR 264 LBC. They anchor them instantly.

    However, I get way too many crawl-offs with the 140gr Berger Hunting VLDs and 140gr AMax. I'm sending these from a heavy 260 Rem.
    The Bergers especially; they are wrecking machines.
     
  6. peashooter

    peashooter Well-Known Member

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    My experience is the 130 gr. Berger do not expand on soft targets like groundhogs. I do not know about coyotes.
     
  7. trebark

    trebark Well-Known Member

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    Your bullet choice here will vary depending on your definition of longrange. If you want to shoot at 500 yards and closer just about any bullet will do. If you want to shoot 600 and farther, the heavier, higher BC bullets are better. Two weeks ago I was in Wyoming shooting prairie dogs with my 260. Ranges were 200 to 600 with winds in the 8 to 20mph range. I shoot the 130grain JLK and it bucked the wind pretty well. If you were shooting one of the lighter bullets you would be at a serious disadvantage in the wind.

    When it comes to terminal ballistic performance, when it comes to varmints, I don't think it matters. If you can hit a prairie dog, it's dead.
     
  8. Rimfire

    Rimfire Well-Known Member

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    +1
    Also what varmints?
     
  9. benchracer

    benchracer Well-Known Member

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    I have been intrigued by the Sierra 107g Match King. The Sierra manual says it can be launched from a 6.5x55 @ 3200+ fps. I have some, but haven't done any serious load work with them yet. Too busy playing with the 140's. Lapua makes a 108g Scenar that is very similar and has a better bc. It may be worth a try if it is more available where you are.
     
  10. nifrand

    nifrand Well-Known Member

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    I just purchased a box of 107gr Sierra HPBT match bullets for my 6.5-284 Savage LRH.I'll start a load process tomorrow.

    Randy
     
  11. 65WSM

    65WSM Well-Known Member

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    I like the 85 gr Sierra. The box in the 70s carried a warning about not loading over 3300 fps but who had a chronograph?

    There are two reasons I like the 85. First it has less recoil and the only bullet that does, even when pushed to 3700 with Reloader 19 in the .264 Win.

    Second, the Sierra 85 will expand. I have shot crows, ravens, coots with the 100 gr Ballistic tip. It does not expand even in front of 67gr of R-19 at 3600 fps. I once shot two coyotes at 270 yards with the hundred ballistic tip. The second one had a fist size exit hole. The first one you could hide a pencil in the exit wound.

    I have also tried the Sierra 100 gr bullets. Just more recoil and less expansion.

    I am building a .22-6.5X47 Lapua with a 40 degree shoulder. Both barrels have been chambered but the dies need to be made and the barrels salt bath nitrided. The advantage I am looking for is the small primer pocket.