When Mother Nature Conspires Against You! By Darrell Holland

Discussion in 'Technical Articles - Discussion' started by ADMIN, Feb 21, 2010.

  1. ADMIN

    ADMIN Administrator

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    This is a thread for discussion of the article, When Mother Nature Conspires Against You!, By Darrell Holland. Here you can ask questions or make comments about the article
     

  2. HUAINAMACHERO

    HUAINAMACHERO Well-Known Member

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    Darrell,
    Great article, thanks for it, there is good advice in it!!!
    Every member should read it.
     

  3. 270 Sender0

    270 Sender0 Well-Known Member

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    Darrell,

    Thanks for taking the time to write this article, you can never hear it enough to
    ”always be prepared”.

    You mentioned a Small Gransfor Bruks axe. How do the small composite handle axes compare to the Gransfor Bruks.
     
  4. prtaylor

    prtaylor Well-Known Member

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    Great read. I think we all need to be remined from time to time about being prepared. I have everything mentioned except the blastmatch fire starter. I had never heard of it before . Thanks for the info
     
  5. tackb

    tackb Well-Known Member

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    good list , i aggree with it and carry most if not all of it when out in the back country the only extra i like is to pack it in a mess tin so i can boil water/cook if nessacery .

    one thing i do however is this , ALWAYS CARRY YOUR KNIFE mine is a very sturdy razor sharp 4" blade type (big enough to be able to carry all the time) on the sheath is a blast match and wrapping the sheath is para cord , this is with me at all times and with this i can deal with most issues and my chances of survival increase ten fold, if you want you can tape a button compass to the sheath as well but to be honest you should know which way to travel and be able to get a rough idea from the surroundings?

    most everything can be improvised in the field except a good knife.........

    finally, practice your skills when it won't matter if you fail ! thats much better than learning when your life is on the line.......
     
  6. ConniesBoy

    ConniesBoy Member

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    The problem with survival equipment is that it gets left behind, not on purpose, but because you’re “just going over there” within sight of the truck or camp or road or where ever.

    I have some things that are always on my person, in pockets and never to be left behind. If I get separated from my other equipment I will always have this some basic needs covered.

    Here how I organize my stuff: I made a leather packet to put some of the stuff in, it’s about 7 inches wide, 4 and ½ inches high with a closure flap but no snaps or other closure hardware. The idea here is that it will fit smoothly and comfortably in the side pocket of my BDU’s. If the gear rubs your leg raw, you’ll leave it behind. If it isn’t in your pocket all the time you will forget it.

    The packet is divided in two sections. One side holds a military issue compass, tritium dial with a heavy cord attached to hang around your neck when in use. The other side has some fire starting equipment. First a Trioxane heat tab, the big ones intended for heating a meal, and some water resistant matches in an extra heavy plastic sleeve. Then there is a 3 inch by 1 inch bar of magnesium with a striker on the edge. Finally, a sealed lighter that a fellow here in Montana makes and sells at gun shows. This lighter uses Zippo parts but is only about 2 inches long and 5/8 in diameter and it does not leak. I have one that still lights up first time every time even after 5 years in the desk draw. Everything goes into the packet, the top flap folds over and then 20 feet of real parachute cord wrapped tight around the packet between the two compartments keeps everything in place.

    In my left side pants pocket is a knife and a flashlight. The flashlight is a two cell Mini-Mag-lite. The AAA work fine, I carry a one cell AAA with me all the time, but the AA last longer. I prefer the Mag-lite brand after several “disappointing” experiences with other brands. My knife of choice is a Victorinox “Hunter” with a 3 inch blade and a 3 inch saw, tooth-pick and tweezers. Not the best for whatever, but it is the absolute best knife I’ve ever found that does every at least passably and more importantly rides comfortably in my pocket. Again, it does you no good if you left it in camp.

    In my hip pockets I place two large cotton bandanas, one of which is brightly colored, red will do, I’m still looking for one in day-glow orange or yellow that isn’t synthetic.

    In my hunting pack for when I’m not “just going to have a look” I carry two more items which I would not want to be without. First is an ax. Frankly, I’d give up a knife in favor of a good ax. Yes, I’ve actually dressed out a deer with just an ax and it works a lot better than you’d think; on the other hand try chopping wood with a knife sometime… My ax of choice is a Fiskars/Gerber model with a 14 inch handle, light, sharp and strong. I wrap the lower part of the handle with parachute cord to improve the grip and plus I’ve got more cord if I need it. I’ve tried the short handled, 6 inch, version of this ax and found it wanting due to the lack of leverage and the handle makes it awkward to wear on my belt, hence it will get left behind.

    The other item I would not be without is a Jerven bag. OK, what is a Jerven bag? Well you might know it by its other name Fjellduken Thermo Hunter Skogka. Alright enough Norwegian humor. It is a combination poncho, thermal blanket, camouflaged hunting blind and sleeping bag cover. The best thing I can do is tell you to go to their website and see what the thing is and how it is used. It is also very expensive. It also works exactly as advertised and could save your life. I have sat for over 4 hours in a 15 to 20 mph wind on a day that never got above 5 above and been quite comfortable. I was dressed for the weather but without the Jerven bag, I would not have lasted 20 minutes. Every one of my hunting or fishing partners that has had the Jerven bag “experience” has either bought one or wishes they had the funds to do so.

    Stay safe and have fun,
    Paul


     
  7. Chopaka81

    Chopaka81 Well-Known Member

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    My Magic Fire Starter - Road Flare!

    I learned this from a back country range cowboy who always carried 2 flares in his saddle bags. He said, "these babies will make wet wood dry."
     
  8. ConniesBoy

    ConniesBoy Member

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    When I lived in Oregon for a few years I remember some of the loggers I met always had a couple of flares around for a warm up fire. Really good idea especially in a damp climate.

    I find it hysterically funny that the "survival" shows on TV and most of the books I've read on the subject spend so much time on food. In a survival situation the last thing you need to be thinking of is food. In cold, wet weather: Warm and dry, everything else is luxury. In a hot climate: Water. Hypothermia will kill you in a matter of hours or even minutes. In cooler weather you can go a few days with out water. In real hot weather you can be near death or unable to help yourself in a day without water. Most of us could use a few days, if not a week or two without food, let alone waste away from the lack of it!
     
  9. Chas1

    Chas1 Well-Known Member

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    Good article, thanks for writing and sharing with us. IMHO always trust your compass unless you want to spend an unplanned night in the Adirondack Mountains in snow like I did.

    Would be interesting to see an article written about ability to survive based on one's state of physical conditioning comparison between hunter "A" in decent condition versus hunter "B" in not so decent beer belly condition.
     
  10. Chopaka81

    Chopaka81 Well-Known Member

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    Honest stroy - a Navy Seal once told me, "it is not about the size of the dog, it is about the size of the fight in the dog."

    Having once spent 3 un-planned days in the woods and walking out onto a indian reservation in Canada and getting a ride back to the states by a car load of drunk indians - I can tell you there is truth in that Navy Seal's assessment.
     
  11. Chas1

    Chas1 Well-Known Member

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    In the Corps we called it intestinal fortitude so no arguing that. I think an article by someone in the know would be interesting as IMHO size I would think matters depending on conditions. For example if your really skinny I'd think you'd starve to death in a shorter period than a robust fella...who knows I could be wrong or if your obeast and out of shape then what disadvantage if any...I don't know. Not to hijack the post just a thought.
     
  12. REDHEAD

    REDHEAD Well-Known Member

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    I've talked to many a person that will not carry an axe in the boundary waters canoe area for the fear of a self inflicted axe wound. Smarter to carry a sweed saw. An injury in the wild , no matter what distance could prove fatal. lightbulb
     
  13. Chas1

    Chas1 Well-Known Member

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    Redhead, where can one go to check out a Sweed Saw? I checked the web and all that came back was commercial machinery saws.
     
  14. ConniesBoy

    ConniesBoy Member

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    Swede saw or Swedish saw is a small metal framed bow saw. The name comes, if I remember correctly, from the Swedish company that made them and imported them in large numbers.

    By extention, if one is worried about self-inflicted ax wounds, you should under no circumstances ever carry a knife, as knife wounds are far more common. Further, why go outside ones house at all? It is a separate subject as to how and why such strange mythologies persist amoung otherwise rational and experienced outdoors people. When I was guiding I constantly had to argue with clients that insisted on "cutting the throat" of a dead animal so it would "bleed out" despite all evidence that all it did was ruin the cape!

    The advantages of an ax over a saw are worth the "considerable" risk involved...:rolleyes: