Whats everyone using for rests?

Discussion in 'Reloading' started by gonewest, Jul 16, 2010.

  1. gonewest

    gonewest Well-Known Member

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    I really didn't know where to put this thread so I put it here. What I'd like to know is what everyone is using for a front and back rest on the bench rest when they are shooting their guns. I have just been using sandbags and the small Y shaped sandbags on top of bags. The problem I have using this method is I'm trying to work up reloads and after I shoot I have to re adjust everytime to try and shoot or I should say aim at the exact same spot. I was looking at a front rest that could be adjusted up or down and had like a padded yolk to cradle the gun. Another I saw that is brand new from Cabelas is called their premium rest. It is basically a cradle for your gun to rest in. Its steel and looks well built you can adjust both front and back up and down. Has anyone used this before and how did they like it. I am trying to find something that will assure me the same aiming pt as the last shot. Or can I just go with the front adjustable Y yolk rest with a few sandback in the back and get the same as the premier rest. I don't want a lead sled or anything with the same principal. I don't think you get the practice using them. I hope this isn't to confusing but try and wade throught this and give some input if you have any ideas. Thanks for reading.
     
  2. Aldon

    Aldon Well-Known Member

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    I just received a cowan front rest this year.

    He is a competitive shooter who also teaches Machine shop and his students produce a pretty nice rest.

    they take limited orders every year.

    Do a search on 6mmbr if your interested.

    Sandbag for the rear.
     

  3. johnnyk

    johnnyk Well-Known Member

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    I use the Rock Jr. for my front rest and a suede leather rabbit ear type sand bag for the rear. Very little adjustment needed when going from one rifle to the next, easy to manuever around with and they both fit under the back seat of my truck. Simple and effective.
    I have tried the cradle type rest, even made one out of stainless steel at work, and I don't think they are capable of returning to the exact point of aim each time. I had intended to make it so that I could take the "human error" out of load development. Didn't work.
    The best advice I can give is, regardless of the type rest(s) you choose, work on perfecting your shooting form.
    Get your cheek weld to stock perfected, try and get the forearm in the same spot. I like using the rear sand bag because once the front rest is set it allows me to make monor adjustments by "pinching" the bag or pressing the butt down into the bag. This lowers or raises your crosshairs in relation to the target. A lot of adjustment isn't usually necessary once it's set.
    I don't try to hold the rifle down and aim it. I get it in/on the rest(s), position it so that it's on target, make minor adjustments and let it do what it does best. This is the only way I can eliminate 98% of me and get the true potential of load and rifle.
    Another area that you probably should look at is your breathing. Learn to put pressure on the trigger when your breathing ryhthm is in the same state for each shot. For me this is when I am exhaling. I stop it halfway through and hold it and complete the squeeze and follow through.
    JohnnyK.
     
  4. gunaddict

    gunaddict Well-Known Member

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    I use Sinclair front rests with windage adjustment. Protektor and Bald Eagle rear bags. I like the cordura bags over leather. Front and rear bags are filled with heavy sand. Sinclair's rest weigh about 17lbs. I tried Midway's front rest. It was to light. I think the heavier the front rest the better. And these rests do help with my shooting form. Caldwell Br from Midway would be a cheaper option.
     
  5. flashhole

    flashhole Well-Known Member

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    I use a butterfly bag. It grabs the forearm securely, is sufficiently heavy that it absorbs a lot of recoil, and it easy to position. I use a simple bag at the butt stock that is mostly used for vertical positioning of the barrel. Johnnyk offered some good tips to improve shooting technique. I find I get the best results when I nest the gun stock firmly into my shoulder. Controling breathing is key and if I could figure out a way to stop my heart momentarily that would help too.

    I sometimes put the butterfly bag on a slab of wood to raise it up a bit, whether I use it or not depends on the gun stock design and shooting bench height.

    [​IMG]
     
    Last edited: Jul 17, 2010
  6. BillR

    BillR Well-Known Member

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    Only thing I ever use is a Harris Bi-pod. Reason is I hunt with it on. I'm not a target shooter. I sight them in just like their going to be used in the field and I don't have to worry about changes. Every time I sight a gun in using a rest and then switch to a Bi-pod for in the field the gun shoots just a bit different. If I sight the gun in like I'm going to be using it then I don't have to deal with it again.
     
  7. J E Custom

    J E Custom Well-Known Member

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    For the money the Caldwell led sled will do every thing you want it to.

    I don't add weight to it because it already weighs more than most rifles and will reduce felt
    recoil.

    I test fire rifles in it strapped down, use it to bore sight a scope in and do accuracy testing
    in it and also use it to hold rifles while cleaning them.

    It is just a good tool that is not expensive.

    I have tried a few High Dollar rest an found them no better just more expensive.

    The other method is a bipod and sandbags.

    J E CUSTOM
     
  8. Boss Hoss

    Boss Hoss Well-Known Member

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    My experience has been 180 degrees different than JE's. Think of the rest "system" both frond and back as a foundation. I have one front rest with 2 different tops one for competition rifles and the other for a sporter now the rear bags I use several different ones all Edgewood. One of the most important things you can do is to level the rest and then the rifle before you start.

    This is my rest and if you would like more detail on how to set up the rests on a bench then shoot me a PM with a number to call because it will take me 30 minutes to type out the entire process but let me say this---when I am finished setting up getting the bags all settled and everything leveled I can slide my 1K rifles back a few inches and then slide them back forward and the crosshairs are still in the center of the bull at 1K.

    Anything less and you are not measuring the rifles true potential imho.

    [​IMG]
     
  9. flashhole

    flashhole Well-Known Member

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    It's always good to practice with your gun just like you use it in the field but when doing load development it sure helps to have some aids (and I'm not talking about the disease).
     
  10. Geno22

    Geno22 Well-Known Member

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    You ask about the Cabellas, well I jut got one and it is ok easy to adjust whitch you will do after ever shot but I had to do this with the lead sled also. What I like about it mainly is it can be adjusted to all guns and most positions as long as you are sitting or in a prone. For the money it is good. Im in my seventies and have not been in this long but I been shooting 5 shot patterns from 1 1/16 to 1 1/4 at a 135 yards. Hope to get better before my aurtheritis gets me.
    Geno
     
  11. gonewest

    gonewest Well-Known Member

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    Thanks alot for all the posts. I never thought about working on my breathing but will give it some practice. I think I will go with a good front adjustable rest and sand bags. Geno I'm glad you tried the rest. I hope you luck with that arthritis. I have it also. It is very weather related. Good luck and thanks guys I sure like this forum for knowlege. But it also is a site that nobody appears to be bigger or better than the next guy. That is very hard to find! :)
     
  12. Ernie

    Ernie SPONSOR

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    For pure accuracy potential I use a SEB Rest.
    After that, if it is not a bench rig, then the bi-pod goes on and stays.
    Yes, I am the US dealer for the SEB and NEO coaxial (joystick) front rests.
    So I do have a prejudice for these front rests:D
     
  13. FEENIX

    FEENIX Well-Known Member

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    +1, especially during load development ...

    [​IMG]

    ... once I'm satisfied with the load, I switch to my bipod that I'd use afield. Good luck.

    Ed
     
  14. Johnboy

    Johnboy Well-Known Member

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    I love my Uncle Buds bull bag.been shooting out of it for 10 years now.just wish I could take it up in the stand with me.they really hold the rifel well.