What was your initial reason for getting into reloading?

Discussion in 'Reloading' started by timmay, Feb 26, 2012.

  1. timmay

    timmay Well-Known Member

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    To be honest my initial reason to start reloading was to have all the equipment and experience needed to be able to make my own rounds for if/when the government puts a full ban on ammo so that I could always make my own, granted if I have all the components on hand.
    I also thought Id be saving money, but this is not the case at all. (well not for 223 and 308..for my 270 wsm I for sure save money)
    Now Im more into accuracy but i still feel the need to be able to make my own in a time of "shtf" when no ammunition is available.
    For that type of scenario, though, I think just stocking up on cheap factory ammo now is the better idea
     
  2. kc0pph

    kc0pph Well-Known Member

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    I stockpile 357 Mag, 44 Mag 45 ACP and 270 Win. I do more pistol ammo due to the ability to cast bullets. I mainly do it because some weeks i cant reload but still want to shoot. I take a 1# (3# for a good day) coffee can full of each caliber i plan to shoot and come home with a can full of brass.

    I started reloading because I wanted to shoot pistol ammo cheap. Mission accomplished. I reload still to this day to save money. Most of my equiptment was handed down to me. A box of bullets costing $20, and a pound of powder costing $30 primers being $4, i get 100 rounds of ammo (And some powder left). At walmart ammo runds over $25 per box of 20. That is about a 50% savings.

    I now load 338-378 Wby. Loaded rounds are about $6.50 each. I can get 50 rounds loaded up for right around $1 each. Huge Savings.
     

  3. timmay

    timmay Well-Known Member

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    Ya I agree that when loading the bigger magnum rounds is where the big savings are at.
    Im seriously considering building a 338-378 now that I reload
     
  4. kc0pph

    kc0pph Well-Known Member

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    Problem with the 378 base case is getting a good price for it. 3.95 is the cheapest i have found and then you have to pay shipping as well. Your brass only lasts around 6 uses (So I hear). They make a collet sizer that helps your brass last up to 20 times but it wont fit in a normal press. So not sure if they actually make it for the 378.
     
  5. alamo308

    alamo308 New Member

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    #1 Having total confidence in the consistent quality of the ammo (and my fault if there's a problem with the quality!).
    #2 Testing different loads for different rifles.
    #3 The satisfaction of making something demanding precision, by hand from start to finish, then putting it to practical use.
    #4 Demonstrating to my sons all of the above, and getting them interested in doing the same.
     
  6. midnightmalloy

    midnightmalloy Well-Known Member

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    Improved accuracy and flexibility in almost any cartridge except maybe 223 and 308.
     
  7. SidecarFlip

    SidecarFlip Well-Known Member

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    I'm going to disagree with the OP and the poster just above me.... Reloading .223's is a savings. cost wise, if you buy the bullets and powder in bulk.... and brass. Quantity is the savings price point and benchrest accuracy too. I reload .223 (a boatload by the way...) at typically 50 percent a factory loaded round costs.....

    I reload for 2 reasons. One, I'm frugal and 2, handloads are controlled ballistics.
     
  8. tnek13

    tnek13 Member

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    Trap lots and lots of Trap. That was back in the late 50's, when I was a teen.. Then, after a tour in Nam with the Marines, there were 44 magnum hunting loads, and 357 full boat magnum loads. Then there was 38 Special target loads, lots and lots of target loads. Then a 270, a 35 Remington, a 308, several 223s, 45/70s and so on and so fourth. 40 years ago you reloaded to get better ammo, tailored to the gun and properly suited to how you were going to use it. And as a by product you saved money. Today, match grade ammo is available and it shoots very well, in fact there are some standard loadings that shoot well, but I still reload to match the bullet to the gun and it's purpose. But, I do buy the "deals" that are out there on Promo loads, especially 12 gauge trap loads. I like to shoot, I like to tinker, so I like to and still reload.
     
  9. feelinducky

    feelinducky Well-Known Member

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    I got into it because:
    1) Get into a new Hobby, it looked cool.
    2) fine tune my loads to the rifle.
    3) They were threatening a $.05 per round tax in California a few years back.
     
  10. MachV

    MachV Well-Known Member

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    Started reloading to keep from blowing a fox in ½ with the 22-250[​IMG] What I learned was that unless you hallar attem and take the shot past 400 yards or use a 22lr the pelt is gonna be worthless.
    30 years and a LOT of rounds later its just a fun/expensive hobby:)
     
  11. SidecarFlip

    SidecarFlip Well-Known Member

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    You aren't in a travelling league per chance? I'm good friends with the President of the MTA. Don't shoot trap myself but I work the trap house ocassionally.
     
  12. tnek13

    tnek13 Member

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    No traveling league in fact any more it is with the Kids, Grand kids and friends.
     
  13. Gene R.

    Gene R. Well-Known Member

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    I started on stool next to my Father in early seventies. It's just what ya did you bought a rifle, dies, bullets and went the basement that night and developed a tailored load for it. And now I have done the same for my boys and nephew. I cringe seeing the prices for equipment and materials these days. A new guy could go broke starting out with nothing. You will save money over time but is going to take more time. As for the .223 and no savings I would beg to differ. You can buy dog town bullets (cheap) and combining them with #5 powber buys and L.C. brass bulk. Your going to have less $ money and a higher quailty reload then the Steel casing russian bulk ammo.

    Gene
     
  14. srlamy

    srlamy Well-Known Member

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    I have shot pistols for 20 years. Went hunting elk for the first time 2 years ago. That got me hooked on rifles. Then I got into long range and elr shooting at steel. I started hand loading about a year ago and my 308 load development has reached its peak at 1200 yards on steel. I just built a 300 win mag and im working on loads for it now. I can do 5.56 for just over a 115 bucks per 1k (brass prep sucks) and 9mm and 40 cal hand gun rounds for 8 bucks a hundred. I got into the single stage for accuracy and then got a dillon for 5.56 and hand gun rounds. It is addictive!