What should I expect from my rifle?

Discussion in 'The Basics, Starting Out' started by Kenster-Boy, Sep 12, 2004.

  1. Kenster-Boy

    Kenster-Boy Well-Known Member

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    I bought a Savage 112BVSS in 7mm rem magnum with a 26 in tube and 9.5 twist Topped with a 6.5-20X40 Leupold LRT. I have been trying to work up a load with Nosler Ballistic tips and have thrown together groups with several differen't powders. The best group I have gotten is 3/4 inch edge to edge of the bullet holes, so maybe a 1/2 inch group. Note: that is a 5 shot group at 100 yards.

    My question being is this load good enough to use for long range hunting or will the bullets just scatter when I start shooting over 500 yards? Should I keep trying other loads or is this the one? I also haven't had a day without a cross wind under 10 mph.
     
  2. Aussie

    Aussie Well-Known Member

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    If that Savage can average 1/2 inch for 5 x 5 shot groups then I'd give up looking . If that was just one group then you haven't fired enough shots to know whether it was a fluke or a good load . Chances are that if it's consistent at 100 yds then it will be out further too . Only one way to find out though .
     

  3. Fiftydriver

    Fiftydriver <strong>Official LRH Sponsor</strong>

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    7mmmag man,

    If your getting 1/2 average moa groups at 100 yards, the next step for you to do is to step back to at least 300 yards and see what the load does at longer ranges.

    No one here can tell you if your load will or won't shoot at longer range. Only your rifle can do this.

    More then likely, it will shoot fine but everything must be tested at the longest range you plan to use your rifle at and it is even better to test farther then you plan to shoot.

    Range is the greatest judge of a good or bad load. You can take two loads at 100 yards, one that shoots into 1/2" groups and one that shoots into 9/16" groups. At that range these look basically the same.

    Those same two loads at 500 yards may print 1.5" and 2.5". Longer range makes it much easier to tell which loads stack up and which ones do not.

    To be honest, the grouping is a good start but it all depends on yor bullet if you plan to hunt past 500 yards.

    In the 7mm family there are B.Tips from 120 to 150 gr. I would only use the 140 and 150 gr for hunting at long range and for true long range shooting, I would much prefer the higher B.C. of the newer 160 gr Accubond over any of the lighter bullets.

    At long range, high velocity means very little compared to high B.C. which will cut your judgement in wind errors a bit less critical.

    What I am saying is you have a slightly larger margin of error judging the wind with a high B.C. bullet compared to a lower B.C. bullet.

    Good Shooting!!!

    Kirby Allen(50)
     
  4. Kenster-Boy

    Kenster-Boy Well-Known Member

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    Thanks I have shot a couple groups like that with the exception of a winger every now and them but I take total responisibility for those. Thanks for the input.
     
  5. Mysticplayer

    Mysticplayer Writers Guild

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    My rule for my LR rifles is the ability to hit a milk jug size target on demand. That defines the max. range due to accuracy and/or weather conditions. Bullet energy for the most part follows the ability to hit the target - use some common sense here.

    Your rifle could very well have all you need for LR hunting. Test at LR and watch for vertical stringing. If you have more then MOA vertical spread, you should consider the powder/primer you are using. Ball powders are usually not good in this dept. Extruded like Hodgdon Extreme usually work very well.

    If groups at 200 to 300yds, look nice and rd, your bullet will stay stable until it hits the dirt way out there or until it goes sub sonic - another story.

    Make up a drop table using a reliable rangefinder and start practising.

    You may also want to consider the 162gr SST. A very accurate bullet, good bullet weight/construction, and very high BC. The amax is another very good choice but should not be used if impact vel exceed 2800fps.

    Jerry