What makes one muzzle brake better than another?

Discussion in 'Rifles, Bullets, Barrels & Ballistics' started by cornstalker, Jan 25, 2012.

  1. cornstalker

    cornstalker Well-Known Member

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    I understand the basics behind what makes these babies tick, but what makes one brake better than another?

    For instance this,

    [​IMG]

    vs. this,

    [​IMG]


    Pros/cons of each?

    Features to look for?
     
  2. SidecarFlip

    SidecarFlip Well-Known Member

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    This is gonna sound smarta** but it all depends on which way it blows.
     

  3. D.ID

    D.ID Well-Known Member

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    The baffle brake has more surface area for gases to impact and push on and a good one should not have any downward vent. The 360 degree port brake kicks up dust underneath but is easier to manufacture. We tried several of each style and hands down prefer the baffle brakes in every regard.
     
  4. Broz

    Broz Well-Known Member

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    I have used many of the top brake you pictured ( JP Precision ) I will list what I like about this brake.

    1: side discharge with large flat areas for gasses to push on and greatly reduce recoil.

    2: top ports to keep muzzle rise to a minimum.

    3: no bottom discharge to blow up a dust storm when shooting prone.

    4: when installed correctly to the proper depth the crown of the muzzle is right at the level of the side ports and this allows for easy muzzle crown cleaning without removing the brake,

    5: Only adds 1.4" to the length of the barrel

    6: No felt blast or precussion to the shooter

    7: Looks as good as it works.

    Jeff
     
  5. SidecarFlip

    SidecarFlip Well-Known Member

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    One thing to keep in mind with any brake is determine which way the spent gasses expell. By that I mean that a side blow will impact any shooter next to you, even at a minimal distance.

    Don't ask how I know.....:)

    Like stated above, you don't want any ports facing down vertically. That aggrivates muzzle climb as well as a dust bomb.....

    Normally, guides cringe when a customer uncases a braked firearm. They know what happens on ahunt........:D
     
  6. cornstalker

    cornstalker Well-Known Member

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    Good info.

    How difficult is it to clock a brake like the JP?
     
  7. SidecarFlip

    SidecarFlip Well-Known Member

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    Someone else will haved to chime in on that. Not familiar with mounting.

    The only one I ever installed was a J-Tac directional and it came with spacers. I had to thread the end of the barrel, not a big thing here, a matter of chucking in a lathe, some turning and threading.
     
  8. IdahoCTD

    IdahoCTD Well-Known Member

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    Generally to clock a ported brake you have to chuck it in a lathe and cut the rear face until, when tightened, it screw on straight up and down (or with the ports horizontal). It's pretty easy to cut too much and have to go all the way around again. It helps to figure out how much 1 revolution is in thousandths, based on thread pitch, and then figure out how many degrees it's off from being on correctly. Always cut less than you think.

    There are some that will also use crush washers if they have a pre-threaded barrel so they don't have to use a lathe or visit the gunsmith. The problem with that is they wear out and get looser. A set screw installed into the bottom is also another way to do it without a lathe or smith but I'd use a brass or aluminum screw so you don't damage the threads on the barrel.

    BTW ported brakes with the ports angled back toward the shooter are generally the most effective but also the loudest.
     
  9. SidecarFlip

    SidecarFlip Well-Known Member

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    The holy grail of metalworking.........

    Always cut less than you think.lightbulb
     
  10. Broz

    Broz Well-Known Member

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    Putting a brake on can be easy. But also is a tedioud job when done correctly. Mine will only be done by a mith I trust. If the brake is installed properly it will align to the perfect clocked position when just snugged up. I never want a brake that has to be tightened hard to be in position. I have seen the results. If you over tighten the brake , the fine threads will mechanically apply pressure to the barrel tube and make a tight spot in the rifling toward the end of your muzzle and it will gather copper. This pressure or tight spot can change everytime you emove or replace the brake with the tight ones. Believe me it does not take much. This is why (as listed in #4 in previous post) I prefer to leave the brake on as much as possible. The JP allows for cleaning the crown and removing it often is not necessary.

    Jeff
     
  11. Hired Gun

    Hired Gun Well-Known Member

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    For the average guy, clocking a brake is as easy as dropping the rifle off at your gunsmiths place.
     
  12. cornstalker

    cornstalker Well-Known Member

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    That's what I had better do.

    You guys have been a ton of help. Thanks.