what is this ladder test

Discussion in 'Reloading' started by backyardsniper, Feb 18, 2012.

  1. backyardsniper

    backyardsniper Well-Known Member

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    Ok im an avid reloader. Albeit i suppose new by some of you guys standards. Been at at for about 4 years now. What i want to know is what is this ladder test i hear everyone talking about. my general load development consists of using a target with five small targets on it and i load four or five loads with one seating depth and different powder charges, shoot them then check results and take the best one and do it again but with best powder charge and change the seating depths and then pick the best load out of those two tests and that is usually it. Is there a better mouse trap out there
    :rolleyes:
     
  2. sp6x6

    sp6x6 Well-Known Member

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    Use this sites search function, If I remember right there is a article on it in articles section
     

  3. Bart B

    Bart B Well-Known Member

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    A ladder test is simply loading a batch of cartridges with each ones powder charge a few tenths of a grain heavier than the last one. Then each is shot at a long range. At some point the drop of 2 or 3 consecutive shots will be closer together vertically. That often indicates a good charge range to test several shots with. Why? Because the muzzle velocity spread between shots is lowest for those few.

    Note this works best for super accurate rifles fired by people who are excellent marksmen. The worse a rifle's accuracy is along with poor marksmanship skills, the less reliable the data is.
     
  4. sdkidaho

    sdkidaho Well-Known Member

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  5. Bart B

    Bart B Well-Known Member

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    I agree. But note it's about the success with a very accurate rifle and highly skilled marksman.

    99% of all rifle shooters will do best testing at short range where the wind won't be an issue. And they should shoot at least 15 shots per test load if they want reasonable confidence that the group represents what all loads like that will do. 5 shot groups are not very reliable. Shooting one 15 shot group is many times better than averaging three 5 shot ones.
     
  6. green 788

    green 788 Well-Known Member

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    wow... looks like Baney might have at least given me honorable mention... (just checked that link where he describes round robin firing and reasons for it)...
     
  7. joe0121

    joe0121 Well-Known Member

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    There is a sticky at the top of this very section...