What equipment do i need when shooting long distance?

Discussion in 'The Basics, Starting Out' started by 505Gibbs, Jul 26, 2009.

  1. 505Gibbs

    505Gibbs Member

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    I am building a .338 Edge right now, and Im planning on buying a nightforce scope 5.5x- 20x. What would you suggest that I need such as (rangefinder, pocket pc,etc.) and what kind would be better than the rest? Thank you for your time.
     
  2. trueblue

    trueblue Well-Known Member

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    I am using a Swarovski rangefinder and a Dell Axiom pda with ballistic software on it. It is a great set up. The rangefinder was alittle pricey, but worth it . I would go with the 50mm Nightforce, not the 56mm.
     

  3. kiwi3006

    kiwi3006 Well-Known Member

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    If you are going to get a PDA, to get the most out of it you will need a weather meter of some sort to get temp, pressure, humidity and wind strength. Kestrel seems to be a brand a lot of people use, although there are a number of others You will also need some form of angle meter.

    I just have a rangefinder, Leica 900, and a wind meter. I have two sets of drop charts one for 2500' and the other for 5000'. These charts also have drops for different angles.

    I am limiting my shots to 600 -700 yards and my drop charts work fine out to that range. With your edge I would imagine that you will be shooting further so the weather meter will be a lot more important.

    Minimum equipment,
    Binoculars
    Rangefinder Swarovski, Zeiss, Leica (probably in that order)
    Wind meter
    Angle meter (I just use a protractor with a piece of wire that hangs down)
    Drop chart

    extras
    Spotting scope
    PDA running Exbal or something similar
    Weather station as mentioned above
    Lots of spare batteries!!

    Stu.
     
  4. britz

    britz Well-Known Member

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    the best thing you can do for your long range shooting is practice. All the best equipment in the world will be wasted if you don't simply practice. Focus on that for a while before you spend mucho bucks. That is unless you already practice lots ;)
     
  5. prtaylor

    prtaylor Well-Known Member

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    I agree with the practice. You can make your drop charts from your practice sessions and find your true capability.
     
  6. royinidaho

    royinidaho Writers Guild

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    Hope this helps.

    You edge should be good to beyond 1200 yards which may influence the range finder needed.
     
  7. 505Gibbs

    505Gibbs Member

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    Trueblue, why do you say to buy the 50mm rather than the 56mm?

    I totally believe in lots of practice, and I will be once I get my rifle done. Is there better models of wind meters than others? And certain PDAs better then others? thanks guys.
     
  8. jmason

    jmason Well-Known Member

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    Only if your going to use for other than ballistics's software. If it's just for ballistics software you can buy any one that meets the minimum requirements of the software you choose.
     
  9. kiwi3006

    kiwi3006 Well-Known Member

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    Something else I thought of

    anti -cant device to keep your rifle vertical for those long shots.

    If you are getting a nightforce scope and are going to use nightforce rings then Shawn Carlock-Defensive Edge makes a replacement top ring that has an anti cant device and I think ACI incorporated into it.

    Stu.
     
  10. angus-5024

    angus-5024 Well-Known Member

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    I use a brunton ADC summit and I think that it is the minimal quality that I would go with. I would like a Krestel 3000 or better (3500), and yes the krestels are better. I also use a protractor with tipit and a weight attached to find my angle, but an angle/cos indicator is optimal. I really think that since your already getting the nightforce scope, I would get the Defensive Edge combo with the anti-cant and the cos indicator. I'm also not a big fan of 56mm objectives just because I find them bulky, but my riggs are always on the light side. For a designated long range rifle the 56mm will be fine.
    Swarovski is the best, but the most $$. get the rangefinder that is the absolute best for your budget, dont cheap out here. leica, swaro, ziess is all you want. If you have no budget for a rangefinder save until you can get a good one, in the mean time get good with a range finding reticle.
    I know absolutly nothing about PDA's so I wount chip in.
    For optics I have found Vortex to be outstanding for the money with a garantee that puts everyone else to shame. I use dimondback 8-42mm and love them, and ther tough. My brother-in-law has a Nomad spotting scope and for $450 CAD it is one heck of a good optic. I guess it all comes down to budget.
     
  11. RDM416

    RDM416 Well-Known Member

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    505Gibs,

    First to weigh in on the 50 or 56mm on the NF scope........I have one of each and really can't tell enough difference in low light or detail resolution to matter. The 50 weighs less and you can use shorter rings.

    The other guys have given some great advice and I won't repeat any other than to say as far as I am concerned the Swaro range finder can't be beat if you can afford it.

    The other things to consider that have not been mentioned yet is what you need to get steady in a field situation. When you step into true long range hunting/shooting it should be a "given" that your crosshairs are rock steady on whatever you are planning to shoot at whatever range you intend to shoot. There are too many other factors to worry about, your crosshairs bouncing around should not be one of them.

    This is where some "practice" time in the floor will come in handy. Many on this site shoot off a bipod with some type of rear bag and that is a good choice. You need to spend some floor time getting comfortable with whatever method you chose to get comfortable with it. I often carry a fairly heavy tripod for my spotting scope. I have fabricated my own rest I can clip on my tripod, and I use a Stony Point bipod on the REAR of the stock so I am fully supported front and back. I find this gets me just as steady as prone with a bipod and a bag, but gets me into a sitting position so I can see over low obstructions. That type of setup may not work for you and I am not even necessarily reccomending it, I am just saying it works for me and you need to spend the time to find out what works for you. The time to figure out how to get steady is NOT at 8,000 feet with a critter on the other side of the canyon:)
     
  12. angus-5024

    angus-5024 Well-Known Member

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    I never thought of useing a bi-pod or shooting sticks for a rear rest, I'm gonna have to try it as I get into some spots where a sitting position would be an advantage.
     
  13. RDM416

    RDM416 Well-Known Member

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    Angus,

    Give the rear bipod/shooting sticks a try. I accidentally discovered this a couple of years ago sitting in a box blind hunting whitetails at long range. I discovered I could rest my rifle on my sand bag on the window sill and them prop my Stony Point shooting sticks under the butt end of the stock and really get steady. I know this sounds a little cumbersome, but with a little practice and setup it is really pretty easy.

    I have been using my tripod while sitting in a chair with the same shooting sticks in the rear and have taken deer at over 700 yards with that setup. I just came up the idea of using a detachable bipod mounted on the rear sling swivel stud and have been experimenting with that. I have found either the Versa Pod or the new Stoney Point bipods work well. They both have quick detachable clips, with the Stoney Point being the smallest.

    If you try this it is important to use a bipod that will allow you to adjust the "spread" of the legs. Once you have the legs roughly in the right position (length), you squeeze the legs together, or spread them further apart with your left hand to adjust elevation, much the same as squeezing a rear bag. Bipods such as the Harris will not work because the legs lock into position and you cannot adjust the spread of the legs. It is way too much trouble to try to use the length adjustment on the legs to fine tune for elevation. I have tried several bipods and so far the Stoney Point seems to be the best with the Versa Pod coming in second.
     
  14. tjonh2001

    tjonh2001 Well-Known Member

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    this is everything that i take in the feild when i am long range hunting. you cant see it in the photo but my rifle has the defensive edge top ring, which has a anticant and a cosine on the other side. hope this helps.


    [​IMG]
     
    Last edited: Aug 12, 2009