Vias and other breaks

Discussion in 'Rifles, Bullets, Barrels & Ballistics' started by Night Hunter, Mar 29, 2011.

  1. Night Hunter

    Night Hunter Well-Known Member

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    What are your thoughts on muzzle breaks. Are the worth the increase in the bark of the rifle? Will they really reduce the felt recoil of a .300 win down to that of a .270?

    If they are worth it, what is the best break and what are the chances of getting a bad one?
     
  2. eshorebwhntr

    eshorebwhntr Well-Known Member

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    In my opinion they are definately worth it if you shoot your rifle a lot from a bench and heavy recoil is an issue or if you shoot a magnum rifle and the recoil is affecting your accuracy and becomes your main concern when trying to shoot.

    In my opinion the only thing you should be thinking about when shooting are the conditions and aiming....not what the recoil is about to feel like.

    Having said that, the only breaks I have any experience with are the Vias and the Hart breaks. There is no comparison, the Hart break hands down reduces the felt recoil and muzzle rise a lot more than the Vias.
     

  3. MT4XFore

    MT4XFore Well-Known Member

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    All brakes are not created equal as far as recoil reduction is concerned. The "perforated" brakes such as Vias, Weatherby and the like are not as effective as brakes that have partioned chambers such as Painkiller's, DE brakes,Muscle brakes,Holland brakes or SSG brakes. ALL brakes create more noise, regardless what their advertising lets on. Also, if one is shooting from the prone position on the ground, the perforated brakes will cover the shooter with whatever loose debris is on the ground. The partioned brakes offer especially good recoil reduction.
    Hope this helps.
     
  4. Bearwalk

    Bearwalk Active Member

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    Most quality brakes, including Vais (of which I have several), will reduce your felt recoil significantly. More important to me is muzzle control. All of my bench and tactical rigs sport brakes for this very reason. None of my hunting rifles wear a brake.
     
  5. Night Hunter

    Night Hunter Well-Known Member

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    This rifle will be mainly for long range hunting and limited paper punching. So I am gathering that I should go without the break...
     
  6. BountyHunter

    BountyHunter Writers Guild

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    Not necessarily.

    do not get a brake that has holes all the way around like the Vais. Very effective, but will blow dirt back up in your face when shooting from a bipod.

    get the other style mentioned like the holland, edge etc.

    You can also have your gunsmith make a threaded cap so you can take the brake off to hunt and put the cap over the threads. Just need to confirm no POI change when doing that before the hunt.

    BH
     
  7. Bearwalk

    Bearwalk Active Member

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    If I were hunting with a 300 WM, I may consider putting a brake on it, especially if it is a light rifle.

    If you shoot prone with a Vais type brake, you do need to avoid laying in the dust, but I generally try to avoid doing that anyway. Won't shove it back in your face, only raise a cloud. This could potentially slow down a follow up shot. Shoot in the grass, or lay a pad down at the range, and you'll be fine. Regardless, I find this is more of a problem out west where the dust can be extremely fine and dry. Here in the NE, I have had to take occasional shots in the dirt and only encountered a very minor "puff".

    Like others have said, if you go with a brake, take it off for hunting. The ears you save may be your hunting partner's!
     
    Last edited: Mar 30, 2011
  8. shortpants

    shortpants Well-Known Member

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    Brake all the way! My 300wsm. kicks less than a 243. I am not sure why everyone is saying go with one for shooting but not hunting? Little foam earplugs weigh nothing and are effective and a finger in each ear for the spotters works wonders! Electronic ear muffs are even better if you want to pack 'em which I reccomend highly for kids so they can hear you wisper but not hear the blast. Whether your shooting paper or animals it is ALL ABOUT FOLLOW THROUGH AND MAINTAINING YOUR SIGHT PICTURE! The bottom line is if there is a tool out there that can make you a better shot then you should at least give it a try. We owe it to the animals we hunt and especially if you plan on hunting at long range. I've had the pleasure of spotting next to a brake while having to hold a hat to shade the shooters eyes on more than one occassion and it sucks but it was my fault for not being prepared with ear protection and does not make me hate brakes. I have become an advocate for ear protection the hard way being raised shooting with no protection and working at an airport. Most people do not use earplugs while hunting and think they don't need to without a brake. I say make hearing protection a habit and use a brake it's like having your cake and eating it too!

    Just so you know rifles don't sound much different with a brake to the shooter just to the people next to the shooter. Keep your spotter behind you and they won't suffer as much.

    Sorry, I'm done preaching now.
     
  9. HARPERC

    HARPERC Well-Known Member

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    Shortpants pretty well said it, I wish hearing protection was emphasized more when I was a kid. Since about 1990 I've carried earplugs when hunting, and an extra pair for my guide, or spotter, or if I lose the first pair. I've got them in my rifle case, shooting box, in my truck, and the ATV.
     
  10. FEENIX

    FEENIX Well-Known Member

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    Give yourself a "break" and get a "BRAKE" ! Safety and protection is the key.

    Heck, I even wear gloves, boots, goggles, and eye protection when I mow. :cool: