Up coming turkey hunt - New Mexico

Discussion in 'Bowhunting' started by mbarnsr2, Mar 28, 2014.

  1. mbarnsr2

    mbarnsr2 Member

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    Oct 21, 2013
    Well, this is a first archery turkey for me. I'm an accomplished turkey hunter, and killed dozens of turkey over the years with a shotgun, but never taken one with a bow. My oldest Son, who is 29 yrs. old, will be joining me and will be calling for me, and I'll be calling for him, and we'll be backing each other up with a shotgun, if we should miss, and the opportunity presents.

    We will be video recording the entire hunt, so I'm expecting to have 4 kills recorded, 2 with bow, 2 with SG, and will share the show with everyone here.

    He is shooting a top shelf PSE and has plenty of archery kills under his belt. OTOH, I've yet to take anything other than rabbits with a bow. I'll be shooting a Horton dual cam, really fast and consistent bow, also very quiet.

    My only concern, is with shotgun I have never bothered with blinds, it simply hasn't been necessary. The primary aspect of using a blind that bothers me, is the noise of getting set up. I know the area well, I've probably taken 25 or so birds in these mountains. But they always roost on vertical slopes, with only small shelves to set up on, very often only 50 yds. or so from the roost too. Would I be better off working it out without the blind, or not?

    I appreciate any suggestions and advice from those who have successfully killed turkey with a bow.

    MB
     
  2. bowtechboss177

    bowtechboss177 Well-Known Member

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    Apr 16, 2014
    My opinion is to do it without a blind. I have always found walking around and calling in for turkeys a lot easier than waiting for them.
     

  3. mbarnsr2

    mbarnsr2 Member

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    Oct 21, 2013
    No, I wasn't referring to setting up a blind and just waiting for a chance encounter with birds. I put them to bed the night before, so I already know precisely where they're roosted. I'm just pondering whether or not to risk alerting them with the sound associated with getting the blind set up, with birds roosted 50 yds. or so down the slope. One mistake can make or break the deal.

    As for after the morning roost hunt, I most definitely won't be carting a blind around at the 9,000' to 10,000' elevations we'll be hunting at. This isn't one of those flat land turkey hunts on food plots, this is a real deal public land hunt. Those that have hunted with me over the years in these mountains, know that hearing a gobbler, often means having to go vertical, as in straight up a mountain slope.

    MB