Turret turning vs Mil-Dot

Discussion in 'Long Range Scopes and Other Optics' started by SamSpade, Aug 18, 2005.

  1. SamSpade

    SamSpade Well-Known Member

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    Only talking out to about 600-700 yards.

    I may be wrong but the consenus seems to be that a fixed power scope of 10X to 16X with a lot of turret elavation is the best setup. I understand the heat waves and mirage argument but most big game hunting is done in cooler weather. Is this the only reason?

    Why wouldn't a 6-24X variable with mil-dots work better because of the sight picture and not the need to count clicks and the crosshairs actually moving? With mil-dots you wouldn't have to worry about elavation range of the scope.

    Looking for an education not an argument!
     
  2. bailey1474

    bailey1474 <strong>SPONSOR</strong>

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    Mirage is still prevalent even in the cooler months.

    I can't tell you from experience on the mildot question, but hope to be able to in due time. My plan is to use both clicking and the mildot for extreme range shooting. In the ranges you are talking, I plan to dial the elevation and use the mils for windage.

    You'll get a much better answer from some of the guys that have more experience w/the mildot. Just thought I throw in my 1 cent /ubbthreads/images/graemlins/grin.gif.
     

  3. sierra22

    sierra22 Well-Known Member

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    Bill Baileys approach is very good, allthough there are several ways to Rome. Holding for windage AND elevation is not as good as holding just for windage.

    If you get a scope with reticle in the 1st image plane you can use the mils at any magnification, not just the one it's calibrated at as with 2nd image plane scopes.
     
  4. SamSpade

    SamSpade Well-Known Member

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    [ QUOTE ]
    If you get a scope with reticle in the 1st image plane you can use the mils at any magnification, not just the one it's calibrated at as with 2nd image plane scopes.

    [/ QUOTE ]
    You can still use the mils at any magnification it is just a different figure per dot. Example is a scope set to read 3.6 mil at 10X would be 1.8 at 20X.

    A good point on the windage plus elavation!
     
  5. lead lobber

    lead lobber Member

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    Samspade,

    At the ranges you specify, holdover won't be simple but it can be done. The main reason for dial up clicks is a very precise aiming point at long ranges. In my experience magnification matters less than wind correction. Anybody can hold steady and shoot but damn few can judge the wind!!! Also a quality scope with accurate clicks is important. Be suprised to find how many scopes are not really 1/4 min clicks. At long range that will give you fits!!!
     
  6. Ian M

    Ian M Well-Known Member

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    You have to remember that mildots or their spacings are a "mathematical unit" - roughly 3.6" at 100 yards and this changes as the distance increases. There might be some correlation to where your trajectory is relative to the dot positions but probably not bang-on. Dots are a faster method of hold-off compensation, they offer a repeatable reference, not dead-on accuracy in most calibers. We shoot in 100 yard increments to learn what distance each dot is close to, then refine it a bit by shooting in between at 50 yard increments. We draw a little chart, with the crosshair intersection and the four dots and top of post, then pencil in the distances that the dots are good for. Might have a note like X-hundred yds - X dot, 6" low. Don't forget that the top of the post is also an aiming point.
    Far more precision by clicking the exact drop into your elevation.
     
  7. royinidaho

    royinidaho Writers Guild

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    [quote
    You can still use the mils at any magnification it is just a different figure per dot. Example is a scope set to read 3.6 <font color="blue"> inches per dot </font> at 10X would be 1.8 <font color="blue"> inches per dot </font> at 20X.


    [/ QUOTE ]

    Just clarifying /ubbthreads/images/graemlins/wink.gif I switch between 10 and 18 power frequently in the field. Thus have developed drop charts for both powers. <font color="purple"> But I loose track some times. When on 18 and thinkin 10 the dust flies enough low or short that ya think the rifle broke. Duh! I don't even think about comeups and goesdowns /ubbthreads/images/graemlins/confused.gif </font>
     
  8. James Jones

    James Jones Well-Known Member

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    From my understanding the Mil-dots were not intended to use as hold overpoints but as a rang measuring device then the scope was to be dialed up to the required zero for the range that you figured.
     
  9. SamSpade

    SamSpade Well-Known Member

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    [ QUOTE ]
    From my understanding the Mil-dots were not intended to use as hold overpoints but as a rang measuring device then the scope was to be dialed up to the required zero for the range that you figured.

    [/ QUOTE ]
    I think your understanding is incorrect! See the link here to TK Lee and scroll down to Muliple Dots: Bullet Drop.
    http://www.scopedot.com/id4.html
     
  10. jb1000br

    jb1000br Well-Known Member

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    [ QUOTE ]
    [ QUOTE ]
    From my understanding the Mil-dots were not intended to use as hold overpoints but as a rang measuring device then the scope was to be dialed up to the required zero for the range that you figured.

    [/ QUOTE ]
    I think your understanding is incorrect! See the link here to TK Lee and scroll down to Muliple Dots: Bullet Drop.
    http://www.scopedot.com/id4.html

    [/ QUOTE ]

    Mil-dots were DESIGNED for ranging and double as holdover points too.

    TK Lee/ballistic mil-dot (bad name) and others were designed to hold over.

    http://www.alpharubicon.com/leo/mildot.htm

    JB
     
  11. SamSpade

    SamSpade Well-Known Member

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    Sorry I didn't realize you were only saying DESIGNED.
     
  12. SamSpade

    SamSpade Well-Known Member

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    [ QUOTE ]
    [ QUOTE ]

    You can still use the mils at any magnification it is just a different figure per dot. Example is a scope set to read 3.6 <font color="blue"> inches per dot </font> at 10X would be 1.8 <font color="blue"> inches per dot </font> at 20X.


    [/ QUOTE ]

    Just clarifying /ubbthreads/images/graemlins/wink.gif</font>

    [/ QUOTE ]

    Thanks, that is what I meant to say!
     
  13. sscoyote

    sscoyote Well-Known Member

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    I use ranging and ballistic reticles for downrange zeroing, ranging, and windage reference. I even take the simple plex as far as i can (have 1 on a .17 Mach IV handgun, that gets me TACTICALLY to about 350 or so). I don't run clicks in the field as i have a system that allows me to reference holdover and windage as exact as i can possibly get it in tenths of each stadia-stadia subtension no matter what reticle i'm using-- ballistic or ranging. The system is very accurate even on pr. dog size targets, BUT it's not as accurate as someone that's referencing windage directly along the horizontal axis of the x-hair with some stadia, and clicking with a repeatable turret. But i've found it's close enough especially to 600 yds. no problem. As Ward Brien of snipertools.com says (paraphrased)-- "if you're clicking you're wasting time." I believe that's true to some certain distance way out there (cretainly to beyond 600 for most setups).