Turning garage into reloading command center! Ideas welcome!!!

Discussion in 'General Discussion' started by shortpants, Feb 18, 2012.

  1. shortpants

    shortpants Well-Known Member

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    I'm going to gut my 3 car garage and turn in into a reloaders paradise! Taking everything out, painting walls and ceiling, installing cabinets, loft racks, having A/C installed, updating lighting, and building a reloading bench/command center. I have never reloaded before because of a lack of space inside the house. I can't take it anymore so let the remodeling begin! Currently my garage is a constant 120*+ through half the year as I live in the Phoenix area. I don't visit out there very often in the summer months but that's about to change.

    Since this is my first reloading bench build I thought I would ask for input from the experts. If you have any ideas, plans, links, or sources you can think of that might be useful please feel free to share.

    Thankyou,
    Jason
     
  2. 300 ultra

    300 ultra Well-Known Member

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    For the AC option use a ductless mini split, not a window shaker framed in. Security reasons and efficiency. I put a ductless heat pump in my garage and works beautiful.
     

  3. Bullet bumper

    Bullet bumper Well-Known Member

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    If you are worried about bench construction then I suggest you think about using modern die systems that require far less effort to use and as a result need far less solid reloading benches .
    If you use a Lee collet die or a bushing type die to neck size and a body die to do the rest then no big solid bench is required . I can body size a 223 case with one finger on the RCBS press handle. I can body size a 308 case with a very light hold of the press handle and I do it all on an old dining table that my wife threw out 30 years ago.
    The super rigid reloading bench is only required for old fashioned full length sizing dies and maybe big magnums . Anyway the actual rigid bench part only needs to be big enough to accommodate the press or presses that might use old dies or big magnums not the whole reloading area. It might save you some money to look at it like that.
     
  4. SBruce

    SBruce Well-Known Member

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    My biggest concern and highest priority would be climate and humidity control. We don't want condensation forming and making rust on our dies, tools and rifles. We don't want the humidity too high or it will also eventually affect primers and powder. I've heard that high temps will also affect powder eventually by drying it out.?

    My other priority would be security, and making sure the garage doors are able to be locked down really good.

    Elaborate benches are nice, but not necessary. I do all my loading (have for years now) on an old pine desk and kitchen table. But, if money and space aren't a concern; build the best bench you can, maybe put a shelf or two below the bench top and install some cabinets on the wall above the bench top. I'd put lighting under the cabinets to light the bench really good. Be sure to plumb in power receptacles for all the electric reloading tools that might someday fill the bench, like tumblers and case trimmers and powder dispensers and the sky's the limit these days. I'd also make a separate bench area for cleaning guns, mounting scopes and such.

    Sounds like a cool project, best of luck with it.:)
     
  5. kc0pph

    kc0pph Well-Known Member

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    I have a bench about 8' long and 3 1/2' deep made from 1" particle board supported by bricks with a masonite board on top. On the top rear of the bench i have a full length shelving unit made from 3/4" particle board. suportted by 3 12x12 bricks It has 4 boards which makes 5 shelves. in between each brick is a 12x12 piece of particle board that helps support. I then loaded up the bench with all of my bullets, brass and a bunch of lead ingots. Press is bolted to the table, and tabletop was leveled. This is a cheap way to build a strong work bench. I also saw a youtube video of a guy who mounts all of his "Presses" on a piece of wood that looks like /__\ and a metal mount they slide into. This allows him to have one station and he can put his lubersizer, rcbs chucker and CoAx Press all in one spot.

    As far as gunsafes if you put them in the garage conceal them and bolt them to the floor and wall if able to. If not fill the bottom with lead ingots. I keep mine in my basement with cast lead bricks in the bottom. 2 guys cant lift the thing up, let alone get the thing up the stairs. In my area guns are not stolen, safes are.

    I would advise against carpet for the reason of primers. Them darn things get stuck in the carpet and are a pain to get out. Store your powder below the bench. You do not want sun shining on your powder/primers.

    Also not to be the bad news guy, but keep several fire extinguishers around the area.
     
  6. shortpants

    shortpants Well-Known Member

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    Thanks for the replies guys!!!
     
  7. cowboy

    cowboy Well-Known Member

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    I have a similar setup to what you are proposing. When I built my house it had a 3 stall garage in original design. I eliminated one of the over head garage doors and ran a fire wall down between garage door 2 and 3. So in essence - you have to go into my garage to get into my gun/reloading room.

    I would be a little nervous to have all my reloading equipment exposed everytime a garage door was open, but that is just me. I live in the country and it is still a concern of mine due to the fact that someone (Usually me) left an overhead door open and left or you go out in the morning to see one of the garage doors has been open all night.

    No matter what you end up doing I would draw it out to scale and have some sort of plan/idea of what you want the end product to look like.

    All ideas are great as long as they all fit together. I found you can not have enough storage space - lay out any cupboards, cabinets, benches, gun safes or whatever and see how it'll all fit together.

    Good luck - the process will be a pain but well worth the effort in the end.
     
  8. Boss Hoss

    Boss Hoss Well-Known Member

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    To keep it short---all of my dies and reamers are in one of my safes for humidity control.

    Make sure the AC is not blowing across the bench!!!! When you are using scales you will understand LOL!!

    If it is in your area Fin Form is a great plywood product.
     
  9. shortpants

    shortpants Well-Known Member

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    I understand what your saying about air blowing the powder all over.
    Humidity is not near as much a concern here in Phoenix although it gets a little humid during our monsoon season. It's the relentless heat I'm concerned about. If I don't run ac out there I'll never go out there. If I do it will cost a fortune. Story of my life. Been researching having a company come in and do all the cabinets and apply an epoxy coating to the floor. It's not as expensive as I originally thought. They could do it in a few days vs it would take me weeks. I would have to pay to store all my stuff while I did the work. Hmmmmmmm... Will keep you posted!
     
  10. SBruce

    SBruce Well-Known Member

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    It's not that the powder will blow around easily, but rather the reloading scale will lie to you if air is blowing on it while you're weighing powder or zeroing the scale.
     
  11. shortpants

    shortpants Well-Known Member

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    Aahh I see! Thanks for the tip!
     
  12. winmag

    winmag Well-Known Member

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    Fling me a P.M. with your e-mail, & I'll send u pics of my garage setup. Maybe you can get some ideas. I can tell you a few things I'd change about it, but overall I Love my setup.

    As far as climate controll/moisture controll etc. for primer, & other moisture sensitave stuff, many folks use a mini fridge, not plugged in. Seals up nicely.
     
  13. shortpants

    shortpants Well-Known Member

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    Sent you a pm.
    Thankyou,
    Jason
     
  14. Broz

    Broz Well-Known Member

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    Jason, I just recently finished my reloading room. It works very well for me. I will post some pics and you can look it over. If you have any questions fire away. Also, I love!! the island bench. I can work from any side and it is up at a great height to do my gun work.

    Here goes,
    Jeff

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