Tune up ?s for New Savage 112 BVSS

Discussion in 'Long Range Hunting & Shooting' started by 6.5x300, Apr 24, 2010.

  1. 6.5x300

    6.5x300 Well-Known Member

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    Was able to pick up a new Savage 112 BVSS in 300WM. Looking to those of you fimilar as to suggested modifiactions to make her shoot to full potential.

    Trigger feels great allready but bolt seems a bit rough in travel.

    Have seen this gun with the decelerator recoil pad. Any suggestions on a good recoil pad? Needed?

    What do you guys think of the pillar bedding? I do have some davcon steel putty on the way.

    What about the muzzel crown? Barrel break in?

    Got a farrel 20 moa steel one piece I will mount with steel putty as well. Then probably mount a Wotac scope. Should make a good shooter for little investment.

    I have not shot her yet just looking ahead. Ofcourse I will see what is possible as is right out of box.

    Thanks in advance.

    BT
     
  2. blipelt

    blipelt Well-Known Member

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    I just sent a 112bvss to my smith to tune it up. He is replacing the recoil lug and pinning it. Headspace, clean the crown up, square the bolt face, and pillar and bed with a Karsten cheek piece added. I am then sending my bolt to Sharpshooters supply to have a tactical knob and flute/coat the bolt. Should be a fun little shooter when it is all completed.

    Brent
     

  3. johnnyk

    johnnyk Well-Known Member

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    Mine is the older 112BVSS which has the flat receiver (pre AccuTrigger). I replaced the factory trigger with a Rifle Basix and I intended to have it bedded until I shot it. With handloads it shoots .3's at 100yds and 3.5" groups at 550yds. I'm happy with it just as it is. JohnnyK.
     
  4. liltank

    liltank Well-Known Member

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    In my opinion, load some ammo up and do a break in. If you don't like the way it shoots, then take the other steps. I did how ever do a bedding job just to squeeze a little more accuracy out of it. The pillars are solid and provide plenty of support for the action. The actions run a little rough in the beginning, but after 300rnds or so it smooths out. Just so you know, the bump in the lift of the bolt is always a part of working the action. They don't have the smooth lift of the worked over Remington, but it is solid.

    Make sure you do a good break in. They smooth out nice when it is done right. You should be able to squeeze some good accuracy out of it just the way it is.

    Tank
     
  5. flyin lizard

    flyin lizard Well-Known Member

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    Totally agree with what tank said , a good breakin then see how it is . Why do things that may not be needed.
     
  6. blipelt

    blipelt Well-Known Member

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    I agree with the above mentioned, why do it if it isn't neccesary.

    Mine was new, I spent the extra $200-300 for one reason, time. I don't get much time off from work, so I want to have the best chance for accuracy right from the get go. It would be different if my wife and daughter liked to shoot. An hour at the range is an hour away from my family. I try to make the best of my range time since it cuts into my family time. The only answer I have is to buy more land and have my range out my back door. <=Won't be happening for quite a while though


    The bolt work will be for looks only but it will give it a personal touch.

    Brent
     
    Last edited: Apr 25, 2010
  7. Eaglet

    Eaglet Well-Known Member

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    I wonder if you gain anything by squaring the bolt face since it has a
    floating bolt head.
     
  8. liltank

    liltank Well-Known Member

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    From my understanding and talking with gunsmiths, you don't gain anything due to the floating head. It automatically squares to the barrel upon closing the bolt. This is the advantage of the Savage action and some credit its accuracy due to this concept in design.

    Tank
     
  9. I was wondering the same thing.
     
  10. blipelt

    blipelt Well-Known Member

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    Guys I realize what you are saying but I read an article on 6mmbr.com about savage actions trueing and timing. I was visiting with my smith and He said he would check it out. I picked up the rifle today and seen he didn't touch the bolt so it must have been alright. I was also incorrect about having to pin the recoil lug on a savage. We replaced the recoil lug but you don't have to pin it like a remington.

    Here is the article that caused my interest. Savage 6.5-284 -- 'Badlands' Now I would love to say I understand all the article but I don't. That is why we have gunsmiths.


    Brent
     
    Last edited: Apr 26, 2010
  11. Fitch

    Fitch Well-Known Member

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    Congratulations on getting a nice rifle!

    I'm also looking at tuning up a new 112 BVSS but mine is a 7mmMAG. If I could afford it I'd buy another one in .300WM but I only get one rifle a year.

    I don't see much point to machining on the Savage bolt face or lugs, or sleeving it either. The floating bolt head avoids the bolt face rocking issues that happen in other actions unless they are sleeved.

    With regard to bolt stiffness: Get some Lucas #2 Red and Sticky lube at Tractor Supply or an automotive parts store (it comes in a grease gun tube full for less than 3 bux) and a Monoject 412 syringe

    http://www.bigappleherp.com/Monoject-Syringe-412

    and you will have a life time supply (and then some) of good bolt lug lube. Apply it sparingly to the cocking surfaces, between the floating lug and the recoil lug, and the ejection ramp on the back of the bolt. The bolt will break in after a while and be quite smooth. I racked mine a hundred times holding the trigger to make it cock each time and it is noticably smoother already.

    It It also isn't necessary to pin the recoil lug on a Savage if one uses the right recoil lug - one designed to be used with a Savage that has the indexing lug on it. Precision ground recoil lugs specifically designed for Savages are available from Sharp Shooter Supply.

    It does make some sense to true the receiver front face and I've done that to all my Savage actions and a couple for friends but can't assign any particular accuracy improvement to it. I've machined stubs to hold barrel nuts to true those because they take the place of the shoulder on a normal barrel tenon, but again can't assign any particular accuracy improvement to that either.

    My 112BVSS (7mmMAG), brand new, needs to be recrowned because it has a tiny burr on the crown but the bore looks really good (did a borescope examination today) after 5 rounds of brake-in cleaning between each round. It will get another 5 rounds of single shot breakin-clean before Friday when it goes to the range the first time.

    Trigger breaks at a nice crisp 2 lbs out of the box. I'll leave the trigger alone although it is a pound lighter than I think is optimum in a hunting rifle.

    About the only thing it may need other than having the crown touched up is a good glass pillar bedding job. A good bedding job isn't hard to do. I replace the factory pillars when I do it.

    One of the nice things about these rifles is that not much is needed to make them into really good long range rifles since they basically start out as good rifles right out of the box. If all rifles were as well made as these 112 BVSS rifles gun smiths would go broke because they just plain don't need much customizing and they are heavy enough (mine is 13.0 lbs with scope mounted) to not need a muzzle break.

    What's to not like?

    Fitch
     
    Last edited: Apr 26, 2010
  12. mopar440

    mopar440 Well-Known Member

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    A savage barrel shoots realy good the ones i have do. the best improvement i had with my savages is the stock bedding making sure its solid if you have a plastic trigger gaurd get metal one i think yours came with the metal but if someone is reading might not. The reciol lug is stamped i always replace them when i rebarrel and rebed but dont know if really helps i havent had any work done to the actions other than a bolt handle i will be sending one to SSS to have tured and timed just for the smoothness my buddy had his done its amazeing how smooth it is compared to a stock one it a cheap investment if you really think about it $125 is nothing

    just shooted gun)
     
  13. 3fingervic

    3fingervic Well-Known Member

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    Everything I've read says no, as far as timing the bolt. That said, it is supposed to make it a lot smoother.
     
  14. liltank

    liltank Well-Known Member

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    +1, that is what I was getting also.

    Tank