Tire Chain Possible Problem 2003 Explorer

Discussion in 'General Discussion' started by T3-OleMan, Oct 18, 2013.

  1. T3-OleMan

    T3-OleMan Well-Known Member

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    In 2005 I bought this V8 4x4 and I ordered 2 sets of 'V' welded cross bar chains from PA for the tire size.


    They are B.F.Goodrich P245/65R17 RUG TRL.


    Never needed them but I take them to CO in trailer every year. I'll need them this year for 3 Rifle.


    Question is will these bad boys tear up the stuff around the wheels even with a perfect fit. Do any of you know if any one ever ran chains on front or back of 2003 Explorers? Sure aint much room. Ran 4 wheel chains on my old 66 Bronco but this is scary close. Any eye witness results from back in mid 2000s. Or who can I call that will know to GO or NO GO!!!! lightbulbDon't think those cable contraptions will do a dimes worth of good. Please HELP.....I don't need to take the weight if it is a NO USE THEM. Thanks
     
  2. sp6x6

    sp6x6 Well-Known Member

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    Dont know but have wheeled alot of 4x4 w/chains. Try to avoid front myself, twisted few axels.I would put them on and go slow and check clearance. I have big truck chains I moded for my Jeep. I have a tall skinny tire, I run chains and front and rear lockers
     

  3. kcebcj

    kcebcj Well-Known Member

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    Most of the new 4X4's I've looked at don't have enough clearance in the front wells without modification to run Ice Breaker chains that you describe above until you get into the 1 ton's. I have a 90 GMC that is chained up 4-5 months a year with Ice Breakers front and rear. Bridgestone AT's tire size 285-75-R16 and I had to work on the front wells to gain enough clearance. Did a clean job and it looks stock almost. You need minimum 2-3 inches at its narrowest point with the tire turned. I also have a set of modified truck chains to run when its fresh snow or powder but when things start freezing it's the Ice Breakers all the way.

    If you are going to chain at all it wants to be in the front so you can steer when icy or when in rough steep country. In the front double the rubbers to keep the heavier chains from looping and hitting the fender well.
     
  4. jackem

    jackem Well-Known Member

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    Highly suggest putting the chains on in good weather and trying them. Last weekend's Colo snow caught us in a "Duh" moment. Of the two pair of chains only one pair fit, both of us wear covered in mud before we admitted the mistake.

    This was in CO area 21 and 30, relatively low altitude for CO and 3 - 4 inches fell and started melting, a mess.
     
  5. bigngreen

    bigngreen Well-Known Member

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    I would throw them on right now and give them the once over, make sure they fit and can be pulled up tight, figure out which links to hook so you can just slap them on and go. Also lets you check out the quality of the chains, we got bit one year by a crappy set of new chains that pulled themselves apart as we drove but we pack a chain med kit so we were fine but it happens!!
     
  6. MachV

    MachV Well-Known Member

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    By all means put them on now for 3 good reasons
    #1 To see if they even fit the tire.
    #2 To see if you have clearance
    #3 just so you know how to put on chainslightbulb
    I was totally amazed last week when I saw 2 trucks head into the bottoms with the snow and wet weather we have been having. We walked down to hunt only to find the last truck stuck right above the middle pond.....and sliding into it. 2 hours later they where still there trying to dig out. We figured we would try to help if they where smart enough (A LOT of people aint!!) The driver did just what we told him to do and got out of the immediate mess they where in but still had to climb the hill. Now they mention they have chains and are wondering if they should but them on:rolleyes: Out of the 4 guys in the truck not one of them had a clue of how to even put chains on and / or what axle to put them on. When we went to put them on the front tires we found out they where chains for a stock tire but this clown had just put on new snow tires 2 sizes bigger. He had a couple of little binders so e made it work but guaranteed that if the came loose he was going to have to put new fenders on his new truck, we had to stop a couple of times to rebind the chains but got them out of there.
    Long way around the barn here but please make conservative choices when gong into the back country and not only have the equipment to get you out but be able o use it!!
     
  7. T3-OleMan

    T3-OleMan Well-Known Member

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    Thanks for ALL the coments. Believe I laid them over the tires 3 or 4 years ago and chickened out after seeing how close the GUTS of the front end are to the naked tire. I will go in Mon to my mech and we will put it on the rack and have a go - or no go moment looking up at them. Really hoped some 03 explorer owners could remember if they were able to run them or not on reg size 17" snow tires.

    Thanks again, I'll let you'all know.
     
  8. sp6x6

    sp6x6 Well-Known Member

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    I usually chain up before Im stuck:D
     

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  9. Sully2

    Sully2 Well-Known Member

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    Ive owned and still own a 4 x 4....and a 4x4 with chains is running somewhere that 4x4 was never meant to go!
     
  10. SidecarFlip

    SidecarFlip Well-Known Member

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    +1 but Colorado does have a chain law. It's for your safety.
     
  11. jackem

    jackem Well-Known Member

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    But they sure are handy for getting back when you go too far...:D
     
  12. The Guide

    The Guide Well-Known Member

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    In my opinion it isn't hunting unless you have to chain up on all 4 to get around. That kind of weather keeps people home and the animals are out feeding in the daylight. It also make them easier to drag with that much snow.

    Back to the O.P.'s problem...

    Test fit on dry dirt before you have to do it in snow. Check clearance in the front and in the back at full droop and compression while the rig is loaded with the same weight as it would be when hunting. The snow makes the ground look flat but your suspension will still be doing a work out. Also turn your front wheels from lock to lock at full compression to check for clearance. I know you want a general yes or no but your suspension may be different than someone else along with different size tires (as much as 2"+ between brands on the same aspect ratio tire) and loads. I have seen an unstoppable truck with chains on it eat itself once a couple of elk and half a load of fire wood were put in the bed. Brake lines and fenders all took a beating with tight chains.

    Be safe and carry recovery gear!

    Jay
     
  13. Tikkamike

    Tikkamike Well-Known Member

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    everyone pretty much covered what you need to know but ill reiterate. I run chains a lot and I LOVE wearing chains cause it transforms your rig into a tank. I deally you dont want rubbing to be possible but in a pinch you can make due just get them on good and tight BEFORE you need them and take it slow. Put them on now and go drive around a little and see if there are issues. take along a 4x4 block of wood itll help greatly when putting them on.