Thumbhole stocks ?

Discussion in 'Long Range Hunting & Shooting' started by Tnwhip, Jan 16, 2014.

  1. Tnwhip

    Tnwhip Well-Known Member

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    I have several rifles that I have Laminated stocks and like them. I have a 700 varmint in 22-250 with the plastic sock that needs to go. I was wondering about a laminated thumbhole stock. I have never shot or held a rifle with a thumbhole stock. Anyone shoot a rifle with a thumbhole? What are the pro's and con's.
     
  2. Broz

    Broz Well-Known Member

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    I have built several and my 300 win wears one. They are said to reduce felt recoil when prone. Aslo it seems that everyone can easily shoot the rifles with them. I am not sure there is anything bad to say. Some do not like the looks. ?. Mine is a Mcmillan and was under 2 lbs which is light enough.

    I like them.

    Jeff
     

  3. Varberger757

    Varberger757 Well-Known Member

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    The only minus with thumbhole stocks is the reduced firing rate if that is any important factor?! Repeating can be a little bit awkward sometimes...
     
  4. rooster721

    rooster721 Well-Known Member

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    I've got a few thumbhole stocks on my rifles. Mine are MPI silhouette stocks.

    I find that a good thumbhole design puts my shooting hand "in the place it should be" to put it bluntly. Closest ordinary stock that (I find) "puts my hand where it should be" (or close to it) is my HS stock on my sendero, the one with the heavy palm swell.

    To me, an ordinary stock grip doesn't position your hand well at all for consistent (comfortable) gripping of the stock when triggering. When shooting with an ordinary stock, I find my hand often positioned halfways "off" (below) the grip altogether! And I don't care for that at all. With (my) thumbhole MPI stocks, I find my whole hand is on that grip, as it should be.. and is easily repeated consistently. They're very comfortable to shoot.. it aids it confidence and consistency of position. To me, comfortable repetition makes for "muscle memory" developing (in good/proper ways) and is very important to ones shooting and accuracy.

    I wouldn't trade my thumbholes for gold
     
  5. Toptuna

    Toptuna Well-Known Member

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    The only negative to thumb hole stocks is if you do not have a thumb at all:D then it just becomes a hole stock.lightbulb
     
  6. WildRose

    WildRose Well-Known Member

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    They look cool but I'd seriously suggest handling one before spending the money on it. They are very awkward for someone not used to shooting them or some other straight stock with a pistol grip.

    If for example you shoot AR's a lot then you will probably like it but if you haven't it's going to feel very strange.
     
  7. WildRose

    WildRose Well-Known Member

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    Also you would want to check your state firearms laws and laws of any states you are traveling to for hunts since to some idiots any form of a pistol grip on a stock makes it a nasty assault weapon.
     
  8. Panchik

    Panchik Well-Known Member

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    I have shot from one and my feeling is the following:
    It is good for target shooting when you do not need walk and have enough time for shooting preparing or for varminting.

    I would not take it for mountains hunting because it is not so versatile as usual hunting stock which can shoot from any positions.
     
  9. AZShooter

    AZShooter Well-Known Member

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    While I don't own one, I have shot the Lawson thumbholes on several occasions. Lawson's thumbhole is far more refined than other thumbholes. It was designed for offhand hunting. Harry Lawson created this stock in the 60s with the intent that it would be fast and mitigate recoil.

    I am friends with the current owner Randy Lawson (the late Harry's son) and visit his shop often. I have been going there for over 25 yrs. I go to them for gunsmithing that I cannot perform myself. Randy designed the McMillan Lazzeroni thumbhole sporter as well as the McMillan Lazzeroni sporter for John Lazzeroni's rifles.

    The straight line of the stock plus the large thumbhole at a comfortable angle and the wide flared recoil pad help soften the recoil. Lawson has uses a crossbolt safety in the trigger guard something that the other thumbholes don't offer.

    The thumbhole is also offered in a laminate.

    Here are a few pictures of a left handed Lawson thumbhole:

    [​IMG][​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
     
  10. Broz

    Broz Well-Known Member

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    The rifle used in the "comparing the 210 215 Berger thread was my 300 win in a McMillan Lazeroni thumbhole stock. During that one season the rifle was handed to several hunters to use while we spot and stalked in for antelope deer and elk. 19 big game animals were taken from shooters of 13 yr to mid 70's. 19 shots , 19 tags filled. Not one complaint, no one struggled with the stock and several remarked after they loved it. Many had never shot the rifle before. Shots were from 200 yards to over 1000. Just thought this was some good data from a variety of shooters with not much thumbhole experience.

    Jeff

    Edit: This one is not included in the 19 of that thread. It was this past season and this gals first elk at 13 yrs of age. She had never seen the rifle until I pulled it from my back pack scabbard. I had her dry fire a few times on the elk then she stoned it in its bed at 601 with a perfectly placed shot.

    [​IMG]
     
  11. Bigeclipse

    Bigeclipse Well-Known Member

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    Two slight negatives I found for thumbhole stocks.
    1.) semi-auto rifles with thumbhole stocks and magazines are now illegal in NY...stupid safe act!
    2.) I know this is a long range forum but there have been times I was in a tree stand hunting and the deer presented me a shot 100 yards or less where I had to switch hands due to the position I was in on the tree. This meant shooting with my opposite hand. Of course I always see if I can shoot with my strong/dominant hand but at shorter distances I was not too concerned with this...this would be VERY uncomfortable with a thumbhole stock...or if you wanted to lend your rifle to a lefty shooter...they wouldnt be able to use it. Again these situations are rare but just wanted to give you some more answers to think about.
     
  12. phorwath

    phorwath Well-Known Member

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    The thumbhole stocks seem to have the comfort of hand position advantage for long range hunting where rapid cycling of the bolt is generally unimportant.

    For those that have used them, do they complicate and compromise one's ability to complete quick follow-up shots that might be required at close range in responding to, or finishing off animals that fight, attack, claw, and bite? Bears are ever present everywhere I've hunted in Alaska, and therefore always a planning and precautionary consideration.
     
  13. Broz

    Broz Well-Known Member

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    To tell you the truth. I have shot this rifle off hand and also have practiced follow ups prone as quickly as possible with good results. Once shooting at 1805 yards while demonstrating in one of my shooting classes, I got this reply from my student and my spotter. "Man, you sent that second shot before I could give you a correction." This was to demonstrate the importance in good form and a good brake that allows you to self spot misses.

    I shoot lots of different rifles and stock configurations. In my opinion the idea of one of the Thumbhole stocks hindering fast response to a second shot holds little water. I don't even notice a difference.

    YMMV

    Jeff
     
    Last edited: Jan 17, 2014
  14. rooster721

    rooster721 Well-Known Member

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    I don't find mine hinders bolt-cycling either.. I too spend considerable time in the mountains where bears & cats are present, and I wouldn't for a second think my thumbhole stock would be to blame if I couldn't get a follow up shot (or aggression shot) off in good time. In the case of long-arms (period) you'd have a bigger problem swinging and shouldering fast enough than you would cycling a round in. The argument of slow cycle-time is a lousey argument against thumbholes... mine certainly don't hinder it to any point it be any concern