throat too short

Discussion in 'Gunsmithing' started by harfman99, May 6, 2010.

  1. harfman99

    harfman99 Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    70
    Joined:
    Mar 10, 2008
    hello

    hello i have a custom 7 ultra and the throat is very short. I am shooting 180 bergers @3.750 oal being set this deep puts the base of the bullet into the powder and reduces case capacity. Inorder to optimize the potential of this round i need to throat it .250 deeper. The rifle shoots very well but just is not at its full potential. I have found a hand throater from midway and was wondering if this is a job i could do myself or will i have to take it to a profesional.


    thanks
    Chris
     
  2. Loner

    Loner Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    599
    Joined:
    Apr 14, 2010
    I have never seen a throat anywhere near that much too short. I would take it to
    a pro. Once you do it you can't go back.
     

  3. Gene

    Gene Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    1,326
    Joined:
    Jan 23, 2007
    This is NOT a home workshop job. You should have told your smith what bullet you intended to shoot before it was chambered. Take it back and have him re chamber with a longer throat reamer.
     
  4. canderson

    canderson Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    300
    Joined:
    Mar 6, 2008
    I would take it to your gunsmith and see if he will let you watch the operation. It is a simple method and tool use but, if not get impatient or lose focus, you will have a lot longer throat than you wanted. If that happens you can either jump your bullets or have the smith set the chamber back. I watched my local smith do my f class rifle. He let me borrow his throater becasue I had to move it out a little farther. The hand throater is essentially a precise drill bit. It is very sensitive to pressure. The more pressure=more material removed. Bottom line watch someone do the first one then if you think you can do it, let er rip.
     
  5. Broz

    Broz Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    8,636
    Joined:
    Feb 3, 2007
    So when shooting long VLD's like the 7mm 180 and the .308 / 210 where do you guys like to see the base of the bullet in relationship to the neck? I have noticed on my 300 wm's chambered with standard match reamers , that if you try to seat off the lands lets say .060" to .100" the bullets are really deep in the case. Is ther a "majic" place for the base to be.

    Jeff
     
  6. Kevin Cram

    Kevin Cram <b>SPONSOR</b>

    Messages:
    1,156
    Joined:
    Mar 9, 2004
    ultimately I like to have the bullet seated with the boat tail junction of the bullet at the neck shoulder junction of the case. If your trying to fit it in a magazine you can run into some problems depending on the bullet though. Thank you Mr. Wyatts !!
    I would recommend having let the smith that chambered the rifle for you throat it to a dummy round that you supply him with, with the bullet seated where you'd like it.. Don't be surprised if he charges you for it though since you might not have specified your intended bullet originally.
     
  7. J E Custom

    J E Custom Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    7,266
    Joined:
    Jul 29, 2004
    +1
    Good advice all around !!!

    J E CUSTOM
     
  8. Rustystud

    Rustystud Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    431
    Joined:
    Dec 25, 2007
    It depends on your skill level and access to the necessary tooling.

    Have a local machine shop make you a bushing .701 OD with a .4375 ID appoximately 2.5" long. The back side needs to be turned 90 degrees to the bore.

    You will need a PT&G piloted throating reamer with the correct bushing.

    You will need a PT&G Uni Throater.

    I recomend a Lambeth/Kiff Micrometer Adjustable Reamer Stop.

    It can be done with a with a .4375 ID Bushing with a locking set screw.

    Absent the Lambeth/Kiff Micrometer Adjustable Reamer Stop you will need some form of measuring devices IE: feeler gauges and micrometers.

    Remove the throat in incremental steps as you cann't put metal back.

    Measure throat and cut a little, then measure again.

    If you cut to much you will have to set the barrel back.

    Good Luck

    Nat Lambeth

    ps. the tooling for doing this job will cost approximately:

    Piloted Throating Reamer $698.00

    Additional bushings $11.00 each

    PT&G Uni Throater $69.00

    Lambeth/Kiff Micrometer Adjustable Reamer Stop $189.00

    PT&G Reamer bushing $30.00

    Bolt Race Bushing .701 OD .4375 ID by 2.5" approximately $35.00

    Barrel Set back $225.00
     
    Last edited: May 9, 2010