The Target--the Final Arbiter...

Discussion in 'Reloading' started by green 788, Oct 7, 2012.

  1. green 788

    green 788 Well-Known Member

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    I developed the OCW loading process over a dozen years ago when I hadn't been reloading very long, and didn't have a lot of the "goodies" I have now to help with load development.

    The process was, by necessity at that time, chronograph independent.

    I just touched the 3rd rail of obsessive compulsive load development there, I'm sure. But let me make my case:

    A properly conducted and properly interpreted OCW load test, performed at the prescribed 100 yard point, has always yielded excellent long range results. Of the long range loads I currently use (.243 Win, .308 Win, 30-06, 270 Win, and 338 Lapua Magnum), all were developed at the 100 yard line--and none failed to perform well at 1000 yards (or even farther).

    In my opinion, we tend to rely way too much on chronograph data for our load development methods. Yes, there's "more than one way to skin a cat." I get that. But some would have you believe that without a chronograph, you're wasting your time. One fellow on another forum I peruse even went so far as to tell a new reloader that he shouldn't even bother starting without a chrongraph, as his results would be meaningless!

    And of course that's just plain wrong. For decades, folks worked without chronographs and did just fine. And you still can today, turns out... ;)

    I have a saying I coined at the Practical Riflery forum... "the target is the final arbiter." In the end, no matter how good your numbers look, the target gets to say what works and what doesn't. I've seen loads that spit out great numbers across a chronograph stutter and stumble when paper targets are reviewed at long range. Other loads which had a lesser "chronographic pedigree" seemed to do just fine... somehow. :) Obviously there is a lot more that goes into a good load recipe than simply a string of tight velocity numbers off a chronograph.

    By properly interpreting what we see on the target, we know what is going to work and what isn't. An MOA group at 1000 yards is an MOA group at 1000 yards... so who cares what the chronograph says about it?

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  2. IdahoRedneck

    IdahoRedneck Well-Known Member

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    I searched through your posts and read more on your method but I must say still confused on how you read the targets... Just as a question how would you interpret this target.
     

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  3. green 788

    green 788 Well-Known Member

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    That top left group looks like where to be... assuming the same bullet and seating depth at 92 grains... you have a good node there.

    I don't know what process you used to shoot the groups (round robin, or just "one at a time")... and it looks like there's a bullet change in lower right group? Not sure.

    I can say you've got a great shooting rifle there. That's for sure. :)

    Dan
     
  4. IdahoRedneck

    IdahoRedneck Well-Known Member

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    Thank you im hoping it shoots equally as well when I strech her out...... I could not figure out how to link my other thread here which would have explained more its a few down from this one "help w 300 ultra groups". The groups were shot all together with the exception of the fouth shot on the 91.5 charge.... This brass was sticky in my shell holder so I wasnt going to shoot it at all, but when I found I had no pressure signs with these loads I shot it last it was the bottom shot.
    Im going to retest these loads in the round robin style and see where i end up. Thank you for your input. I was thinking that group too other than the vertical.... Thanks again
     
  5. green 788

    green 788 Well-Known Member

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    Vertical, if it continues to be present, can be worked out with a very slight seating depth adjustment, either in or out... stick with your current seating depth until you confirm the powder charge for sure...
     
  6. IdahoRedneck

    IdahoRedneck Well-Known Member

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    Okay thanks for your insight... Its appreciated
     
  7. Skyking

    Skyking Official LRH Spponsor

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