The Practice of Scoping.

Discussion in 'General Discussion' started by BrentM, Oct 21, 2013.

  1. BrentM

    BrentM Well-Known Member

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    Wondering how many people do this, know of people who do this, and why it is done? This is simply the practice of using your scope to view objects, in particular, ME.

    As I kid I knew to not point a loaded weapon at people and I used the very nice scope on my rifle to see distance objects. Occasionally I would see people, albeit, very rarely. Today there are hordes of people out there and I see very few with a good set of Bino's so I know they scope objects.

    What lead me to this question is how I react to it. I don't react well and I literally start shaking with anger and adrenaline. I was scoped from 130 yards Saturday and I started to go nuts. I don't want anything bad to happen, which is why I stopped rifle hunting a long time ago. I can't handle it. I want the kids to experience the outdoors and hunting so I am trying to deal with it better and seeking some alternative view points. A guy at work said he used to do it too but thinks this guy and others, especially at close range like that, are doing it intentionally. For example, to intimidate others.
     
    Last edited: Oct 21, 2013
  2. royinidaho

    royinidaho Writers Guild

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    I don't much care for it either. That's why I hunt in away from people areas, for the most part.

    When too many people around I ghillie up and remain pretty much stationary. Thus I see them before they are aware of me. I bino them regularly.

    An experience from years a go.

    Two of us were on a ridge in sage just above tree tops. Third fellow was down in the trees.

    3 hunters w/horses were glassing the side hill below us from the next ridge over. It was a cow elk hunt. One of the more dangerous hunts as far as I'm concerned.

    The three horse hunters brought their weapons to bear and cut loose. I knew that the two of us were in their scope's field of view.

    I could hear the bullets snap and impact a few yards below us in the trees.

    I said to my buddy, "To hell with this!" The idea was to stop the shooting. Also this was long before my LRH days but I knew my rifle quite well.

    I figured that a little dust about 30 yards or so below them would get their attention. Especially when they couldn't help but see me pretty much aiming at them and firing.

    I asked my buddy to spot the hits for me telling him which rock I was targeting.

    First shot was good enough. Two more shots were in the same small area.

    Last I saw was three horseman dropping over the other side going away.

    Haven't had to do that since!

    If that happened today, I'd catch 'em on video, video them at camp and post social media and F&G.
     

  3. BrentM

    BrentM Well-Known Member

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    See, my anger stopped me from pulling my camera out and videoing this POS instead I was giving this jack the finger while going in to an offensive kneeing posture with a LR rifle. Must have been a bit intimidating for him to see this process carried out so quickly. I don't really remember ripping the rifle off my kids shoulder but he does. He said he tried to hang on to it but I was in a zone.

    I like the vid idea, that will be my weapon of choice if it happens again. We watched 3 dudes from roughly 2500 - 3000 yards out. 1 nut job pulled a pistol out and was pointing at his buddies and acting out the shot. The similuted shot made us whince. We thought OMG he just killed that......wait, is he playing? That was one of the most bizarre things I have seen yet. Who does that?
     
  4. Scot E

    Scot E Well-Known Member

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    I guess I am somewhere in the middle. I use my scope to glass from time to time. I especially use it to judge animals as the reticle I have helps me measure. There have been more than one occasion where I was glassing an animal with my scope, saw something else through it and ended up scoping some other hunters. I think the difference is I immediately took the scope down and off of them. I doubt they even saw me.

    I agree with Roy. I hunt as far back in as I can to avoid this. It has been a long time since I hunted the low country in a general season. One of the reasons I like archery, fewer people to bug me! :D

    Not an easy issue. It would be nice just to trust guys to do the right thing but today . . . not so much. If guys would just use some common sense it wouldn't be such a big deal. A lot of yahoo's out there.

    Scot E.
     
  5. SBruce

    SBruce Well-Known Member

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    It's not only wrong (based on what our generations were taught) but it is also quite illegal, at least it is in Wyoming.

    In WY, if one points a gun at another person it is deemed "reckless endangerment". It applies whether or not the gun is loaded. It is a serious misdemeanor and if convicted is punishable only by jail time, up to a year.
    Theoretically, a person would not be convicted if they were pointing the gun in necessary defense of themselves or others or per statute:

    unless reasonably necessary in defense of his person, property or abode or to prevent serious bodily injury to another.

    I would personally consider myself in serious danger if I noticed someone pointing a scoped rifle at me. Especially after it was obvious that I was another person and not some game animal. Hard to say what lengths a person might go to in order to defend themselves when they feel their life in imminent danger.

    IMO, when possible, the people who use scopes to purposely watch or spot another hunter; ideally should be filmed and then somehow identified so they can be charged and prosecuted.

    For anyone reading this that is a "scoper".....Binoculars and/or spotting scopes aren't expensive, they're easy to get and they probably wont get you shot if you're looking at someone through them.
     
    Last edited: Oct 21, 2013
  6. SBruce

    SBruce Well-Known Member

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    I am sure we've all at one time or another accidentally found another hunter in our scope field of view. Like you said, the difference is ceasing that action as soon as it's realized.

    IMO, those that continue to "watch" through their scopes are setting themselves up for either prosecution or possibly something way worse.
     
  7. varmintH8R

    varmintH8R Well-Known Member

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    I sure hope I don't know anyone who does this. If I was with someone putting a riflescope on a person their rifle would get stepped on quick. If I was on the other end, I would be thoroughly freaked out. Out with my kids? Cant even imagine.

    People don't think.... You get a guy like Roy and he warns you off. You get someone with "issues" and you get SHOT.

    I can't imagine what would make someone think it is OK to watch someone through rifle glass....

    Semi-related, I found myself downrange of an idiot playing target practice with no backstop, just shooting his pistol off into the woods (not in a remote area, either). When they didnt stop when i ate dirt and screamed my lungs out i took offense. Called the Sheriff and the deputy says "I'm not going back there, they might still be out". Took 6 follow up calls before they go to the guys house. He says "wasn't me". They say "OK".

    Sent him a nice registered letter letting him know if it happened again I would have to assume it was intentional - haven't heard him popping off since lightbulb

    Nutty people out there, got to watch out for your own safety!!
     
  8. MMERSS

    MMERSS Well-Known Member

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    17-year-old admits to shooting, killing Malta teen while deer hunting

    Unfortunately and with sincerest sympathy to the family this type of incident can result in the worst. In this state it is a crime. If someone points a rifle or any firearm at you within a distance you feel your life is in danger you can request charges. Is this any different than taking your rifle downtown and pointing it into a crowd at 150 yards to try to find your friend? Ultimately it will be up to the individual "victim" to pursue this issue. I would.
     
  9. MHO

    MHO Well-Known Member

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    Thats why i get as far as possible away from the public. Too many %$#% out there.
     
  10. MontanaRifleman

    MontanaRifleman Well-Known Member

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    This used to happen to me all the time in PA and often less than 100 yds and it just made my blood boil. It has happened here in Montana too but the crowds are a lot less and longer disatnces between parties usually so I generally feel a lot more safe. Most places I hunt anymore I see very few hunters during the course of the day if any.

    Not saying it's the right thing to do, but I have put my rifle up and scoped them right back so they get the point. sometimes it makes an impression and sometimes it doesn't. I have never walked up to any of these nimrods and confronted them and not sure if that would be a good idea or not.

    If I were in Roy's position, I probably would have done exactly the same thing. What idiots....
     
  11. BrentM

    BrentM Well-Known Member

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    He was scoped back and it clearly bothered him to see it done so quickly and with LR rig. My problem is that I am a scrapper and don't mind throwing down if the stakes are high enough. I spent enough time in the cage/mat/arena etc to know that things don't always go the way you want so I try and keep a level head if possible. I have chased a guy down with my glock on the mountain once. He didn't really like having it stuck in his face from 2 feet away but as I explained to him.....there is absolutely no difference in what I am doing vs what he was doing. He felt differently but I didn't care. He pointed a loaded rifle at me from 150-200 yards away and I pointed a locked and loaded pistol at his face from 2 feet. I still don't see the difference.
     
  12. varmintH8R

    varmintH8R Well-Known Member

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    I vote "not a good idea". Seems like a lot more bad than good is likely to result. You pretty much already know that you are dealing with someone who is at best a moron, at worst an irrational, degenerate moron. Odds are too high that something real bad will happen for my tastes.
     
  13. BrentM

    BrentM Well-Known Member

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    This is good point and the reason I started the thread. I need options. I got out of general season hunting for a reason and have a reason to be back. I love taking those kids so I need to learn to deal with it. I have a lot more to lose these days as well so, the new tool, as mentioned earlier to me, is to use the camera. I have a great little video camera that I pack everywhere.
     
  14. varmintH8R

    varmintH8R Well-Known Member

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    The camera is a good idea. It's a tough subject in general, and I waffle on the best way to handle it. In a very common-sense way, confronting/scaring/defending is the "right" thing to do, but the real-life implications and outcomes are scary as hell to say the least.

    Maybe make a big scene about shielding your kids (Secret Service style) and they'll realize what they are doing. Or pack a sign that says "Don't point your gun at my kids, A$$hole"

    I sympathize in a big way - there is no good way to deal with "these kinds" of people. You back off and you have regret, you confront and you may have major, life-changing regret.

    Good luck out there with your kids - there is nothing better. I hope the rest of your season goes the way it is supposed to go.