Test Driving The Defensive Edge LRMK 338 EDGE + P

Discussion in 'Extreme Long Range Hunting & Shooting (ELR)' started by Broz, May 24, 2012.

  1. Broz

    Broz Well-Known Member

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    Yesterday I was treated to a visit from Shawn Carlock as he passed through my neck of the woods. Well, not really..... nobody just passes through here as it is clear out in the foot hills of the Big Belts. But never the less I am glad he found me. He was packing his newest creation the LRMK chambered it the amazing 338 EDGE + P. This puppy sends the 300 Bergers at 3135 fps and it does it well. So we jumped in Shawns truck and headed out to a spot where I go to stretch em out. First wild Montana rock of choice was conventienty located at 2550 yards. The wind was pretty fearce but Shawn said " What the heck" With just a couple wind corrections we were on the rock with a final wind dope of 10 1/2 moa Left for the 7:00 ten MPH plus wind. I was pretty amazed when I landed 2 hits within 1/2 moa of each other in these conditions. The LRMK 338 EDGE + P balances on the bipod like a champ and the rear of the stock is open and allows your left hand to grip the lower part of the stock through the opening while squeezing the rear bag. I noticed it was a vary solid and stable feel even when on uneven ground and shooting up at a pretty large angle. Keeping a solid point of aim at this distance requires concentration but is pretty easy with this rifle. At the first brake of the trigger I realized that there was considerable more horse power than the 338 LM I shoot all the time. Recoil was not bad at all, but the push on the shoulder lets you know you just sent 300 grains of Berger lead with athority. Getting back on to spot the hits was pretty easy considering I had never fired a rife like this before and each dust ball off the target give a feeling of accomplishment along with
    amazement.

    Next stop as the sun was setting was a lighted rock with a black spot for point of aim. But we were entirely too close...:cool: So we got in the truck and watching the odometer Shawn says another 2 tenth of a mile should do it...:) We pulled over and set up for a nice little poke at 1886 yards!! Perfect!! Shawn set up behind me with the spotter on the rock. Watching the wind he instructed me to " Hold left side" I did and replied "On it" Then I got the call we all love to hear "SEND IT" I setteled back in and waited for the Berger to arrive. As it impacted the rock. With the evening sun behind us you could see 3 or 4 chunks of rock between tennis ball and grape fruit size fly out into the air from over 100 feet above ground. Holy crap !!! At over a mile!!! Thats some thumping power... :cool::cool: I also noticed upon impact some birds that had settled in for the evening roost decided to leave the county.

    I was able to place two consecutive shots again into 1/2 moa on this rock. Needless to say I was beginning to bond well with the LRMK, but an offer for Shawn to just leave it with me for a few months or years was constructivly denied.

    Back at the house as we ate some very poor "heat me and Eat me" pizza and got ready for bed. I quized Shawn about the LRMK to a point of complete exhaustion. Then we retired for the evening. My sleep was limited as I thought about this new rifle design and how well I shot it. But in the morning as Shawn prepaired to leave for home I got a felling of ease when I told Shawn to "Put me on the list for a LRKM" :D

    Jeff gun)-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

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    Last edited: May 24, 2012
  2. bigngreen

    bigngreen Well-Known Member

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    Jeff, could you give us an idea of the handling characteristics that differ from your 338 Lapua and the LRKM, I'm really surprised that Shawn got out of their with it :D
     

  3. Broz

    Broz Well-Known Member

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    Rhian, it has a different feel as it is a lot less bulky. When you grab it and pick it up it feels ligher than it really is due to the more equal balance of the rig. When you stick it in th aback pack it almost disappears with only a short piece of stock sticking out. That is a huge improvement over my 338 that towers above my head while in the pack.

    While shooting my LM in the A-5 stock I always feel the downward recoil on to the rear bag. This is why I have been stressing the importance of a solid bag to keep the rifle from dropping the rear durring recoil and resulting in elevated hits. With the LRKM I didn't notice the downward recoil in the bag , but more so a rearward in line recoil. These are first impressions and I would need more trigger time in many different shooting angles to confirm. But for sure the fact that hits were landing at the same elevation repeatably , means the rifle butt was staying put. I assume this is related to the fact the action is so far rearward and the rifle is much shorter.

    Jeff
     
  4. shortpants

    shortpants Well-Known Member

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    Yea Shawn called me and asked if he could come down and do some shooting with the LRKM but I told him I was busy. :D NOT!!! Jeff you know your cool when Carlock shows up to let you shoot his latest creation. Amazing rifle and amazing shooting on your part as well!
     
  5. SHRTSHTR

    SHRTSHTR Well-Known Member

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    Wow, this LRMK is starting to grow on me.:D I could be wrong here but I think Shawn is onto something that is very special (Sure he already knows that). At 3135fps, I do not think there is anything in its class. I know there are a handful of 338's that will beat the speed of the LRMK but at what cost? No fireforming that I am aware of, no super custom dies, better barrel life than the super 338's and in a lighter package.

    The rifle design sure is not conventional and is taking me a little time to get used to it. Looks like a rifle the "Terminator" would use. That is not a bad thing though. :D

    One other thing that I am very interested in is the powder that Shawn is using in the "P" version. I know this is a close guarded secret at this time but I just wonder what this powder would do in my 338LAI? I know he has a special throat design but do not think the LRMK would get these velocities with the standard powders the 338's like.

    All in all, the LRMK is #1 in my books and Shawn continues to stretch the envelope. Congrats Shawn, you knocked this one out of the park!

    Ray
     
  6. B23

    B23 Well-Known Member

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    I have to be honest, when Shawn first introduced the LRKM I really didn't see the big deal. I thought it was kinda cool looking but didn't think it was anything I'd ever be interested in.

    That is until I got to play with one. :D

    This past winter I was at Shawn's picking up a project he did for me and Bob let me play around with one of the LRKM's. I didn't get to shoot it like Broz but I was able to shoulder it and get behind it on a bench top in their shop.

    Within just a matter of seconds my whole attitude toward Shawn's LRKM changed. I went from I don't see what the big deal is to Mmmmm this is nice and the more I played with it the more I got what the big deal is. For me, everything about it felt natural. Again, I didn't get to shoot it but it felt like something you could shoot all day with minimal effort from just about any position. I thought the way it's balanced out it didn't feel like it would require me to do much more than pull the trigger. Like Broz said, it felt much lighter than I was expecting

    I ran into Shawn at Bloomsday a couple weeks ago and I told him I owed him an apology. He wasn't sure why until I told him about how I didn't really think the LRKM was anything special UNTIL his dad let me fumble around with it at the shop. He kinda laughed a little then got a grin on his face and said, ok, so how about now, what do you think now? I told him Ohhhh yeah I totally get what's so special about it now!! He said, YEP, it seems to have that effect on people. :D
     
  7. Rocky Mountain

    Rocky Mountain Well-Known Member

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    I shoot a 338-416 impr and only get 3100fps so am very interested in the results that shawn is getting with is 338 P+, his new projest makes the mouth water and the Bank a little worried.
     
  8. lamiglas

    lamiglas Well-Known Member

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    Darn it broz, ive had a canyon rifle on order that should be done in a couple of months. This whole time ive withheld temptation on the plus p but you make me want one. I hope I don't regret Not going with the lrkm! maybe I'll do that one next! Anyway, if u were doing a canyon would u do a plus p, or standard?
     
  9. Broz

    Broz Well-Known Member

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    It all depends on its intended purpose and whether or not I was going past a mile. At this point I definatly see a plus P being an advantage. That said we both have seen the 338 EDGE Canyon rifles perform and they are a sweet rifle. But I guess I see no reason to not go plus P. If you ever wanted it it would be there.

    Jeff
     
  10. Scot E

    Scot E Well-Known Member

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    Jeff,

    Thanks for sharing this info, especially the picture with cheek weld looking through the scope. I had thought there may be some issues with cheek weld but it looks better than some traditional stocks I have seen.

    It is funny, you mentioned it was sleek and more compact than you thought it would be. That is the first thing I saw in that picture as well. there just isn't much there once you get on the stock and your trigger hand wrapped around the grip. Very streamlined!

    In the picture I see that your off hand was holding the support piece at the rear of the stock. Did you like that concept? A lot of shooting would have to be done at various positions and inclines, etc. but after looking at it I would think you could almost eliminate the rear bag and just use your hand a little if needed to slightly raise or lower the rear. This at least in theory has a good chance of minimizing potential for error and could tighten groups vs a larger bag in field conditions.

    I have been planning on my next build being a light weight carry 38 in 338-06 or 338 Win Mag but with the compactness of the LRKM and the extra velocity the +P allows I am really thinking about changing my plans. This gun has been gnawing at me for a while now. I am happy that you got a chance to shoot it!

    Thanks for sharing.

    Scot E.
     
  11. Shawn Carlock

    Shawn Carlock Sponsor

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    Broz,

    Glad I got to stop by and see you again (we he said his place is in the middle of no where he was right but it is a long range shooters paradise, coupled with what is going to be a very nice house and a lovely wife). Thanks for the input on the new platform and a great opportunity to shoot some different country. I'll try to call as soon as I get out from under the mountain of emails and phone calls.
     
  12. Broz

    Broz Well-Known Member

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    Scott, I had concerns about cheek weld before I mounted this rifle. It just does not look like there is much there. I have what I call an anchor point where my cheek bone rides the cheekpiece on my long range rigs. I developed this hold because only one of my rifles has an adjustable cheek piece. I needed a repeatable hold and cheekweld that I could go to for every shot, and it works. If you are a bow shooter you know the importance of your draw hand being in the same place evertime (anchor point). Some use a "kisser button" in the corner of the mouth. I use a knuckle on my ear lobe. My cheek weld I have practiced for long range rifle is just as important. I was pleasantly surprised when the LRMK fell right into my normal cheekweld. If it hadn't I would have never put two into 1/2 moa at these distances without developing a new hold.

    The rear of the stock.... I don't know if Shawn planned this but here is how I see it with my limied amount of shooting the LRKM. The back of the stock has a loop with a flat bottom. That loop is large enough to get your hand through. This offers a couple options. 1: The conventioal hold of the bag with my left hand. I always put the bag simply under the stock and my hand also under squeezing the bag. This will be good when shooting on the flat or down hill with the LRKM. 2: In a field position like pictured above, where you are shooting at a pretty good angle up you don't need much bag. Now add your hand under there and it is too much. So you can do as I was and lay your hand through the loop palm down and grasp the bag. Once I tightend my grip on the bag the rifle became very solid and the crosshairs were very stable. That position shooting up hill that far away can be a little tough, but even with the bipod up all the way it was very much solid on target.

    I don't feel I would ever eliminate the use ofthe rear bag completely. But I do feel that this rifle would benefit from a little differet bag and also in most cases it could be a smaller one. But to be sure of that I would want to shoot the rifle in many more field positions and re-evaluate. I think Shawn and Bob are also of this frame of mind and may be working on a custom bag design.

    In talking with a few long range shooters it seems there are several of us that are of the same mind set. So I will be blunt and admit the looks of this rifle was not my cup of tea. Well... not at first anyway. To me there are few LR hunting rifles that are better looking that the DE Canyon Rifles. They are beautiful with the added bonus of being bad to the bone at sending projectiles to the next hillside even when a ELR shot is required. I have seen it too many time to ignore. Plus they are repeaters. But with the longer shots becoming more of a reality in my world, the fact I haven't loaded a mag box for 4 years now, and the progression of rangfinders and ballistic programs in the last few years, I felt the need to look past my old school taste and look at my practical needs for these shots. Once I grabbed the LRMK and carried it a ways, then crawled behind it, the military design of it was starting to make a lot of sense. Then when I spotted the dust ball off a rock after a long wait for the Berger to go 2550 yards the love affair was on.

    Like Shawn has said before. " The LRKM is not for everybody " But I sure am glad I remained optimistic about this rifle. I now have no second thoughts about it advancing my skill and success rate in the world of ELR.

    Jeff
     
    Last edited: May 25, 2012
  13. Eaglet

    Eaglet Well-Known Member

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    Broz,

    that was some good reading! very good! amazing!!!!!!!!!!!

    Also my mind is being changed. I promise you! :)
     
  14. bigngreen

    bigngreen Well-Known Member

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    Those have been my feeling exactly, but there are rifles I've gotten behind that I did not think I would like but the rifle practically put you in position and balance was so exceptional that the rifle felt light but it was dead when you looked through the scope. Your description of the LRKM is killing me, your going to let me have a turn when you get it right, buddy old pal :D