Target Dot

Discussion in 'Long Range Scopes and Other Optics' started by bamadawg2009, Apr 10, 2012.

  1. bamadawg2009

    bamadawg2009 Well-Known Member

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    Guys I just want to know if I messed up? I just baught a brand new Leupold VX-3 6.5-20x50LR with target dot reticle direct from Leupold. I have never had a target dot before. How good are these reticles for Long Range Hunitng or Shooting, or did I just screw the pooch? I originally wanted the Fine Duplex but they told me that was a 6-8 month backorder because they had oversold their yearly estimate by several million units.

    I cant even get Mark4 rings because the government has some contract for all of those for the next several months, and those things have gone though the roof since then. I used to get the Mark4 rings and bases together for $90 direct from leupold and that was the steel, now they want 100 just for the rings, I looked at them on-line the other nite cheapest I found was over $220 for rings
     
  2. sp6x6

    sp6x6 Well-Known Member

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    Since you have it just shoot it and see how you like it,will work fine for most applications.In Sinclair, or swfa, or I bet Midway Mark 4 rings are $150, for $10 more get NF LIGHT W/tit. cross bolt. If you like clean lines and no 1/2 nut on base get the Seekin,sold on this site,one of my favs.
     

  3. Gene

    Gene Well-Known Member

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    Theory with the target dot is that you can center the ten ring quickly. The dot draws your eye toward the scope centerline. For your application I prefer the fine crosswire. It makes holding off for windage a bit easier.
     
  4. joseph

    joseph Well-Known Member

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    Can you send it back and get your money back too? There are a lot of scopes out there that would have been a better choice. How much did it set you back or what would be your budget? I guess you want it for long range hunting & shooting?

    joseph

    PS: I've done the same thing you just did until I found out what would work the best for me within my budget.
     
  5. REDHEAD

    REDHEAD Well-Known Member

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    Depends on your intensions. I have a Tascorama w/ Dot and like it for good light shooting/ prairie dogs etc.. Since , there has been so many better ones. I had my Leopold from fine duplex to TMR and Elevation knob & love it.
     
  6. bamadawg2009

    bamadawg2009 Well-Known Member

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    I didnt pay retail for it from leupold. I just havent tried many other scopes besides leupold so Im just not comfrotable spending cash on other scopes I know nothing about. I cant bring my self to spend the $$$$$$$$$ on nightforce yet but would love to have one.

    Second Im not a very patient person so I cant wait 6-8 months for the fine duplex because my rifle will be ready before then.

    I hear good things about Vortex but dont know anybody personally that has one that I could try, so Ill just keep this one and see how I like it. Whats the worst that could happen I can put it up for sale and get my cash back.
     
  7. horsefor4

    horsefor4 Well-Known Member

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    Send it back and have reticule changed at custom shop.
     
  8. SidecarFlip

    SidecarFlip Well-Known Member

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    Good grief, there are enough posters on here (myself included) that tout the virtues of Vortex scopes, that should be good enough.

    For years it was 'nothing but Leupold for me' until I took a chance and ordered a Vortex Viper PST. I was very aprehensive about any optic that cost less than half of a comparable Leupy, but my fears were unfounded. I too have a Mark4 among others and I'll put the PST up against the Mark4 any day.

    Vortex makes a quality, repeatable and very clear optic and people are finding that out as evidenced by the wait time to get one now.

    My only fear is that Vortex will come to the conclusion that their optics, because of the demand, should command a higher price, much like Leupold has done with their's. back 20 years ago when Leupold and Stevens was concidered on par with Burris and Redfield, Leupy's were priced accordingly. That all changed as Leupold attained a reputation as a first class optic and then Leupold bought Redfield.

    Actually Leupold bought Redfield so they could offer an entry level priced scope, a bit strange to be, but then again, it's all about money isn't it??

    Leupold has priced themselves above what the average hunter considers acceptable, hence the acquisition of Redfield. It's given Leupold a cheaper, more acceptable optic.

    Sort of like why Smith and Wesson bought Thompson Center but thats another subject.
     
  9. bamadawg2009

    bamadawg2009 Well-Known Member

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    I think Im going to try a Vortex on my muzzleloader before next year and might get one for my AR as well and get rid of the leupold rifleman thats on it now. Then if I like the Vortex I might step up to the big leagues and put one on my 30-338 that I just sold the scope off of.

    Any suggestions for the Muzzleloader as well as AR in a Vortex?
    Id like a 3-9 for the ML, and somewhere around 4-12x44 or 50 for the AR.
     
  10. SidecarFlip

    SidecarFlip Well-Known Member

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    I'm going to acquire a ML yet this summer for fall hunting here. We have DMU restrictions locally that prohibit center fire rifles, Handgun, bow and shotgun and ML only.

    I'm leaning toward a Vortex Viper HS in lower magnification for the ML.

    Can't offer any suggestions for the AR platform. They have never interested me.

    I put a Viper PST 4.5 x 16 on my .338. I still have a Mark4 on the .223 and a VX2 on my Volquartsen custom built 22 target. If Vortex offered an unlimited eye releif 4-6 I'd buy one for my handgun. They don't.

    I believe that the problem with the Vortex line at present is manufacturing capability versus sales. They have to be one of the very few manufacturers that actually have a back log. Just amazing in this economy.

    The higher end Vortex scopes are assembled in the Philippines and I was told (so it's not factual), that they use LOW glass. The lower priced scopes are chi-com. My PST is plainly marked on the base of the erector housing 'assembled in the Philippines'. Of course the very best glass in the world comes from right here, in upstate New York but mortal men (or women) can't afford it.

    Bottom line here is it's never going to be a Schmidt and Bender or a Swaro but then the price isn't either. Actually, considering the price point, all the Vortex line is a fantastic value. As far as guarantee goes, Vortex is a reflection of all the major players. Lifetime replacement no matter if the original owner still owns the scope or not

    ....and no, I don't work for them.:)
     
  11. joseph

    joseph Well-Known Member

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    I have a Vortex 6-24x50mm PST FFP MOA scope with illuminated reticle AND a custom turret. I have been using it on my 6mm Norma BR. hunting rifle which I have shot it in competition at 1,000 yds. Picture of target bellow. Scores & group sizes are in lower right of target. 15 shots in a row that would have been in the boiler room of an antelope. :)

    So the scope is plenty good enough for long range hunting or target shooting. gun)-----------

    I wanted to use it on my "FREEZER FILLER" the Browning BAR 30-06. I put it on and was able to even use the custom turret for shooting out to 400 yds.

    Love this scope and the glass is as good as a VX III if not better.

    http://www.longrangehunting.com/forums/f17/finally-got-my-bar-sighted-89592/

    joseph
     

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  12. Max Heat

    Max Heat Well-Known Member

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    Are you sure that is REALLY the theory?

    I was of the belief that it was intended purely for hunting purposes, to enable you to see where the wires cross, under lighting conditions that are too low to see the actual wires, if they are very fine.

    I could not imagine using ANYTHING other than the finest x-wires, WITHOUT the dot, for BR or target shooting, where light levels that are insufficient for seeing the wires would not be expected to be encountered. That is, if you want to achieve the tiniest groups that you possibly can.

    Doesn't that make a lot more sense?
     
  13. SidecarFlip

    SidecarFlip Well-Known Member

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    I might add that on the lower tier Vortex scopes, the reticle is conventional like Leupold (fine wire sandwiched between glass), but on the upper tier (PST and above), the reticle is etched into the glass, no wires. That process I find to be interesting. Something I'd like to actually witness first hand.

    I do know that the reticle is very crisp (if thats the correct term) on the PST I have and the illumination is very precise across the entire etched surface.

    I have a couple lower cost illuminated sights I use in indoor handgun comp and the illumination at higher levels appears to be fuzzy, I don't use it but's less than ideal (if I did).

    I also like the raised graduations on the magnification bar that face you. With the Leupy's you have to memorize. Not with the Vortex.

    Too bad it has a lame name.....:rolleyes:
     
  14. tulku

    tulku Well-Known Member

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    I don't know about the Reticle being Etched into the Glass , but there is a simple Process for Etching the Reticle onto the Glass . This is a Photo- Circuits Process , and goes like this : You take your Glass and coat it with a thin layer of whatever material you want to use as the Reticle . This can be done by Sputtering with a Plasma , Tungsten Boat evaporation , etc . Next you apply a Polymer which is Photosensitive ( mostly to Ultaviolet Radiation ) and is often called a Resist . You apply Ultaviolet Light to expose the Reticle Pattern on it . You Develop off the Resist in the unexposed part of the Light Pattern ( this applies to a Negative Resist ) . You Etch away the Metal Base so that only the Reticle Pattern remains . Strip the Polymerized Resist sitting on top of the Reticle , and you have your finished Reticle on Glass . You can also add a protective coat over everything at this point if you desire . This is how Photocircuits have been made for decades . The equipment to do this is rather costly .
     
    Last edited: Apr 14, 2012