TAC 15 Crossbow Downrange Velocity - Chronographed?

Discussion in 'PSE TAC 15/15i Crossbow Hunting Forum' started by Len Backus, Sep 8, 2010.

  1. Len Backus

    Len Backus Administrator Staff Member

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    I got 406 fps with an 85 grain fieldtip at the "muzzle". I was unable to get a reading at 100 yards when I tried. Does anyone else have a reading?
     
  2. Eaglet

    Eaglet Well-Known Member

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    That's pretty daring!!! What chronograph did you use?
     

  3. Len Backus

    Len Backus Administrator Staff Member

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    CED M2

    5 shots but the only one that registered said: "6000".
     
  4. OkieBowie

    OkieBowie Well-Known Member

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    For what it is worth: I could not get a CED M2 to read PSE's arrows shot from a TAC-15. I got either nothing or obviously wrong readings in 4000 - 6000 fps range.
    A real disappointment.

    Time to try a different Chronograph.
     
  5. Eaglet

    Eaglet Well-Known Member

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    Gents,

    On page 6 of the Manual for the M2 chronograph it says:

    If you plan to shoot a shotgun or archery arrows, read the appropriate section for
    further details.

    And on Page 12 it says:

    Shotgun / Bows
    The CED M2 Chronograph can be used for shotshells. The system measures the velocity of the front pellets
    in the shot string. A closer screen spacing of the tripod of (3 to 4 ft.) three to four feet from the muzzle of
    the shotgun should be used. This means that the FIRST Skyscreen sensor should not be further than 4 feet
    from the end of the shotgun. In the case of bows, make sure that the Skyscreen sensors are far enough away t o
    allow the arrow to fully leave the strings of the bow before the tip of the arrow reaches the first sensor. Blunt
    arrow tips (rounded or flatter nose) work best! Remember, the sensors need to see a change of light in order t o
    read the arrow.

    Hope it helps!
     
    Last edited: Sep 12, 2010
  6. Len Backus

    Len Backus Administrator Staff Member

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    Eaglet, thanks!
     
  7. tmdegraw

    tmdegraw New Member

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  8. BillyTell

    BillyTell Member

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    Holy cow! This looks like the perfect toy for us obsessed shooters who are anal about accuracy and consistency! I must have me one of these!:D
     
  9. tmdegraw

    tmdegraw New Member

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    Billy, your right, all of us who enjoy tweaking their equipment to get the best performance will want one. They will be doing live demo's this week at the ATA trade show in Indianapolis.
     
  10. vahunter

    vahunter New Member

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    What kind of arrow flight are we talking about out to 100 yards? Is it a large rainbowing shot or what?
     
  11. Len Backus

    Len Backus Administrator Staff Member

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    In roughly approximate terms:

    100 inches of drop from 20 yards out to 100 yards. Group sizes of 2 to 3 inches.

    Complete pass-through of arrows on deer in the heart-lung area at 100 yards.
     
  12. Super 91

    Super 91 Well-Known Member

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    I was able to see the Velocitp while at the ATA show. It was pretty cool, but did have a few "downfalls" at least to me.

    It is an analog system, so the circuit board is not upgradeable. You get what you get. You cannot program it beyond what the factory puts in.

    It is not cheap. I can see a manufacturer getting one to do some serious testing, but the average guy is probably not going to be able to afford one.

    It only comes with one tip. That's a lot of trips down range unless you buy another tip, which is very expensive.

    There were a few other limitations that I took note of at the show but cannot remember right now.

    On the up side, it was well-built and I feel that if you ever had any trouble, the company would take care of you.

    It does deliver data you can't get any other way.

    And is much safer than trying to shoot over your chrono at long distances.
     
  13. Konrad

    Konrad Well-Known Member

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    Excellent information! It's too bad a fellow on a budget won't be able to afford one of these for a few years. This is exactly what archers have been looking for for years. No more guessing or reliance upon someone else's datum.