Storing primers and powder

Discussion in 'Reloading' started by etisll40, Mar 31, 2013.

  1. etisll40

    etisll40 Well-Known Member

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    Can I store my primers and powders for long? I've been using them up, but I'm gonna start buying double so I don't run out when I really need it. How do you store your stuff?
     
  2. MudRunner2005

    MudRunner2005 Well-Known Member

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    Mine is all in my reloading room, which is an actual room in my house, so it stays around 65-67 degrees year round, with no moisture. I've been told they can last pretty much indefinitely if stored inside a house with no moisture and consistant temperature under 85 degrees.

    However, I don't know how true that is....Just what I was told. I've seen ammo from Vietnam that's been stored and shot recently, so I wouldn't see why you they wouldn't last...
     

  3. GNERGY

    GNERGY Guest

    I keep all my powder and primers in the old metal 50 cal. ammo cans. I have some powder that I have been using that is 15 yrs old, AA 2520 that I bought from Natchezz that was only $8.00 a LB in 8 lb containers and I have 3 of those. Also have Fed Mag primers that old that work great also.
    Just my $.02
    Tarey
    I wish I would of bought more powder back then.lightbulb
     
  4. RT2506

    RT2506 Well-Known Member

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    I keep mine in an old refrigerator {not running}. Primers in the freezer section and powder in the other section. Air tight so no moisture and my loading room stays between 60 and 70 * year round. Will last a loooooooog time.
     
  5. acloco

    acloco Well-Known Member

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    Fridge is a great idea in concept, but, no way to handle humidity and static elecricity. ......and.....you are storing in a somewhat hardened container. Vent hole will do wonders.

    Both of mine are kept in a cool, dark wooden area in my reloading room.
     
  6. Lefty7mmstw

    Lefty7mmstw Well-Known Member

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    No worries on holding onto powder for a long time other than keeping the temp. rather controlled. Do check on fire code restrictions as you accumulate though. You may end up building a powder magazine or separating your powder storage to stay compliant.
     
  7. SidecarFlip

    SidecarFlip Well-Known Member

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    Modern primers and powders should last a lifetime if stored somewhere out of the sunlight and cool. Everything is sealed today so no worry about degradation.
     
  8. MudRunner2005

    MudRunner2005 Well-Known Member

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    Speaking of everything sealed, I have had this question for a while now. I have bought and been given a bunch of brass in the past, that has had green corrosion all over the brass and primers. What causes this green corrosion? Poor storage? Also, I have witnessed this corrosoin on brass that has had unfired primers in it, and it ruined the new primers, so when I got it I had to deprime good brass, to clean it up...
     
  9. gamehawker

    gamehawker Well-Known Member

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    I had some powder I bought back in 1992 and used it last year and it was fine.

    I always stored it in a nice cool place.
     
  10. SidecarFlip

    SidecarFlip Well-Known Member

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    Green brass is caused by only one thing....moisture. It's 'rusting' in this case oxidizing. Thats also what causes your fingerprints on a case to cause the case to discolor, the moisture in your fingers plus the oil/acid in your skin.

    I keep my cases in zip lock plastic bags with a silica gel dessicant pack in each one.

    People want their expensive copper gutters to turn green, they like that patina. Not so with cases. Cartridge brass is copper and zinc alloyed together.

    I load them and unlike many posters, do a last tumble in a bowl tumbler to clean off the sizing lubricant and then I box them wearing cotton gloves...... and no, I've never had one ignite in the tumbler.
     
  11. SidecarFlip

    SidecarFlip Well-Known Member

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    Years ago, propellants came in cardboard containers so shelf life was short btw.
     
  12. MudRunner2005

    MudRunner2005 Well-Known Member

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    LOL that was my next question....:D I just don't feel safe doing that. Maybe it's me being slightly still new to reloading, as opposed to yall that have been doing it for years and years.

    Yeah, I pull mine out of the tumbler, clean debris from the flashholes, then put them in Zip-Lok bags, and then store them in sealing surplus .50 BMG ammo cans. Seems to work great for me. I use my sonic cleaner to get all the corrosion off, then I tumble the corroded ones for 5+ hours. to get them shiny again. It's worked good so far. I've turned some pretty nasty looking brass into reuseable stuff.
     
  13. Lefty7mmstw

    Lefty7mmstw Well-Known Member

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    I've shot h4831 from war surp stocks "bottled" in the 70's out of Hodgdon paperboard and it was just fine; that was ten years+ ago though.... Now THAT was some good powder; it makes today's h4831 look rather poor in comparison.
     
  14. etisll40

    etisll40 Well-Known Member

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    Lefty, where do I learn more about surplus powders and where are they sold?