Ski Poles ???

Discussion in 'Backpack Hunting' started by silvertip-co, Jan 2, 2009.

  1. silvertip-co

    silvertip-co Well-Known Member

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    My knee knobs is wore out and am very shaky walking and hiking. I was thinking about going to flea market in Springs and getting two used ski poles to use when hunting-hiking. I got the idea off a stone sheep hunt I seen on tv. It was old guy like me climbing in B.C. with a pretty heavy looking pack and he has ski poles as an aid. Just wondering is anyone else uses ski poles as a backpacking aid when hunting???
     
  2. WildcatB

    WildcatB Well-Known Member

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    That's what I used when my knees where giving me problems. I broke several expandable hiking/tracking poles. The ski poles are almost indestructible. I found an old pair in the garage but I'm sure you can get them cheap and ski-swaps or thrift stores.

    They really helped reduce the stress on my knees. In fact, they seem to reduce fatigue all over - not just your knees.
     

  3. yobuck

    yobuck Well-Known Member

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    i have a condition called spinal stenosis. calcium deposits pinching the nerves. walking causes pain in the lower back, hips, and legs. im putting off surgery as long as possible. any tips on that condition? i wonder if ski poles would help that also.
     
  4. kcebcj

    kcebcj Well-Known Member

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    I have used ski poles for years when backpacking especially in the early spring when there is still frozen snow in the high country. They aid a lot when you are not in good shape and if you have to cross a large patch of frozen snow they really help. Don’t use them when hunting but if needed I sure would.
     
  5. 4ked Horn

    4ked Horn Writers Guild

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    I'm "walking disabled" from a nasty car wreck a number of years ago and I use a ski pole or 2 just about every time I have to walk on an uneven surface while doing outdoory stuff. In fact I used a collapsable (sp?) trecking pole my nephew got me for Christmass this morning to walk 300 yards from the truck to our goose blind across a plowed and planted field. If I'm in the wilderness and not on my ATV I probably have some sort of ski pole, treking pole, monopod or other long stick in my hand. For me it is more for stability so I don't snap an ankle or roll down hill but when packing a bag of decoys or my hunting gear or a backpack having the strength of my arms to share the load makes a HUGE difference on my legs and my lungs. My back is fine so no opinion on this issue.

    Reccomendations:

    A standard ski pole is the strongest but the petaled (flower like) basket will snag on every twig or clump of grass and they load up with mud but they don't sink in the mud as far. Tip: cut off the square edges of the petals so it looks more like a star. They take camo paint nicely.

    A collapsing trekking pole is very convenient (no help if the pole is not with you) but when they get dirty they can get difficult to collapse ot extend. The baskets are normally round(ish) so they dont snag as much but they have a tendency to dissapear when the going gets rough. They are the second strongest option. Dont put any more trust in them then you have to for dangerous walking because if they fail while stopping a downhill stumble you are going down. Paint can goober up the joints. The shock absorbing feature of some poles is a gimick in my oppinion. Actually a bit annoying.

    Shooting monopods are just that. Same issues as the trekking poles but no basket so they poke into most damp soil and have to be lifted out with every step and the joints have the weakest locks so they don't support much pressure. They make a great walking cane, if you will, to improve balance but I don't reccomend them other than they can be extremey light weight and they serve to help steady a rifle for shooting and they are inexpensive (thrift store ski poles are cheap too). NOT FOR DOWN HILL SUPPORT OR CROSSING SHIN TRAPPING ROCK PILES. These are the most likely to fail in the grip as well as the joints. They are better in these situations than nothing, but not much.

    Lastly, I never use the wrist straps. falling when walking is different then falling while skiing. Tripping with a metal bar strapped to your hand will be a fast lesson in leverage and you could soon be learning all the names of the tiny bones in your hands. Broken hands means no walking stick for the long trip back to the rig. IMHO :D
     
  6. silvertip-co

    silvertip-co Well-Known Member

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    Holy cow it sounds like we're all a bunch of old wobbly guys... :)



    Thanks for the input. I'm off to the flea mkt in Springs on Saturday.
     
  7. 4ked Horn

    4ked Horn Writers Guild

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    Wobbly? Maybe. Old?? Never.
     
  8. Dewey

    Dewey Member

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    I have used them since about 1971, am an old seriously mangled B.C. guy (62) and I still get into the remote mountains here. I also like Komperdell C3 trekking poles, but, good ski poles at "Sally Anne" are much cheaper, easy to camo and very tough under sudden heavy load, as in my falling with a pack/rifle.

    The only real "downside" is that they are a bit of a pita to transport on horses or in a small plane. Get some, they really do help!
     
  9. Wlfdg

    Wlfdg Well-Known Member

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    I've been using collapse-able trekking poles for a long time, both, summer hiking, spring/fall hunting and winter backcountry snow/splitboarding. They've been especially beneficial portering where I'm often hauling loads in excess of 100lbs. for as much as 20mi. over up and down a couple thousand vertical feet.

    Past couple years I've been using poles in replace of shooting sticks. Since I'm carrying them anyway.
    [​IMG]

    I just wrap a Voile ski strap around the shaft, stuff a glove or whatever in the top of the X to rest the rifle on and it's good to go. Since they are collapse-able I can adjust them to any height I need.
     
  10. WildcatB

    WildcatB Well-Known Member

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    Nice. I might try that.



    Paul
     
  11. Tikkatactical308

    Tikkatactical308 Active Member

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    +1

    Wobbly? Maybe. Dead? sooner? if I keep this up.:D
     
  12. J E Custom

    J E Custom Well-Known Member

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    It doesnt matter how old you are ski poles/walking staffs are a very good idea !!!!!

    They help your balance and adds a third leg when going up or down hill ,and on rough terrain
    may keep you from a fall with that expensive rifle.

    If you can back pack every thing then two poles are even better, and using you arms can
    take some of the work off of the legs giving you more stamina for that long hike.

    J E CUSTOM
     
    Last edited: Jun 9, 2009
  13. HUAINAMACHERO

    HUAINAMACHERO Well-Known Member

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    Wlfdg,
    + 1, I agree with Paul, using sky poles as a bipod is a good idea. Might be handy someday. Thanks for the tip.
     
  14. Wlfdg

    Wlfdg Well-Known Member

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    You're welcome