Shooting Rest to remove Human Error

Discussion in 'Long Range Hunting & Shooting' started by ronedog, Sep 26, 2011.

  1. ronedog

    ronedog Member

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    I'm looking for a shooting rest to use while I work up new loads. I would like to use a rest that removes as much of my human error as possible during the load work up process.

    I looked at the Hyskore DLX Precision (Here's a link: Cabela's: Hyskore® DLX Precision Rifle Rest

    I liked the idea of this rest and the hydraulic trigger release, but I'm wondering if experience has shown this to be a bad product. Some of the reviews are positive and some are negative.

    Has anyone here used this rest? What would you recommend?

    I'm mostly a seasonal hunter and got into reloading a few years back, but haven't had much time to dial in my loads for my 30-06 until this last month. I've gone through a box of berger VLD's only to convince myself that I need a rest that won't be affected by my human error, etc...

    Thanks,

    Rone
     
  2. kcebcj

    kcebcj Well-Known Member

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    I don’t personally care for any of the mechanical shooting aids. I understand your dilemma not knowing if it’s your shooting skills the rifle or the load that gives you the 3 inch group at a hundred yards but if the rifle is capable and your skills are capable then it’s the load. Trigger time and a good smith makes that the case!
     

  3. B23

    B23 Well-Known Member

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    In my opinion, the problem with these types of shooting rest's is getting back to the exact point of aim after each and every shot taken.

    After every shot the gun, obviously, recoils and everything moves. I think you would drive yourself crazy spending ALOT of time resetting everything so your point of aim is in the exact place it was on the previous shot/s.

    Again, this is just my opinion but I think you would be much better off spending your money on a good front rest.
     
  4. ronedog

    ronedog Member

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    thanks B23. However, wouldn't I have to do the same thing with a "Front Shooting" rest anyway? Or am I missing something that perhaps I don't do that I should be doing?

    I guess, as I think about it...I don't really think any device can be made to return my gun back to a perfect zero...so hyskore's claims that the DLX can do that, is something I really don't agree with...however, I am willing to accept this going into it.

    I plan on realigning my gun each shot anyway, so realigning the cross hairs is ok with me. I did like the idea of removing my human interferance at trigger pull...this is where I have problems and I think my load data is inaccurate because I'm not as good a shooter as I ought to be.

    Now knowing this, is there a better route for me to take?
     
  5. Boss Hoss

    Boss Hoss Well-Known Member

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    Do the research on how the BR folks do it. Not rocket science by any means but like any other process is only as good as the person executing it. I could type literally pages on what I do when setting up for a relay or shooting in the field using my table. When buying a rest and bags it is always better to cry once and get it over with depending on how serious you are about your accuracy.
     
  6. B23

    B23 Well-Known Member

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    ronedog, yes you do but to me the difference is you don't have everything all strapped and cinched down like you would on the rest you are talking about.

    Maybe I'm missing something but I would think you would almost have to leave it all strapped together then shot after shot realign everything, rest gun and all, back on your exact aim point to get any consistency. I think if you didn't keep it strapped/cinched up snug and tried to just realign the gun then restrap it the gun would obviously move while you were strapping it down and you would have to start all over.

    This is just my opinion and as we all know they are like, well I'm sure you get the picture. :)
     
  7. ballistx

    ballistx Well-Known Member

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    My recommendation would be to get a 17HM2 and start shooting. Shoot at from 25 to 50 yards. Practice, practice, practice. Once you get where you can shoot the 17hm2 into 1 hole at 50 yards (or the best the gun will do) you can confidently shoot the 30-06 on load development.

    The reason for the 17hm2 is it is more accurate than the inexpensive 22LR's shooting cheap ammo. If you have a quality 22 and get the shells it likes, you can do the same thing with the 22lr. The idea is to use it to refine your own skills so you are a better shot with the 30-06.
     
  8. MHO

    MHO Well-Known Member

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    I really like my led sled to dial a rifle in then practice.
     
  9. MSLRHunter

    MSLRHunter Well-Known Member

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    I use the Caldwell Lead sled for load development only. It is rock solid. Then after load development I only shoot from a bipod and rear bag.
     
  10. ronedog

    ronedog Member

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    Guys, thanks for the replies and help. Sounds like the lead sled is a good way to go, but after I practice more. I think I'll take the advice to hone in my skills, then hone in on the load for the 30-06. Thanks for the input.
     
  11. BlackKnight755

    BlackKnight755 Well-Known Member

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    Ronedog,

    I personally think that you would do better with a good front rest instead of a "lead sled" type rest that holds the whole rifle. The reason being, some rifles shoot better with light pressure (almost free recoil) and some rifles shoot better when you put more pressure on the stock and grip. If you cinch the rifle down then you are limiting the way that you would normally shoot it. You could work up a load in the lead sled type rest and then take the rifle out and more than likely it would shoot different. And as far as the trigger activater, I would suggest just go ahead and spend the money for a Jewell, you'll be proud you did.

    This is just my opinion... BK
     
  12. ronedog

    ronedog Member

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    Thanks for your help and replies. Here's what I tried. I bought the hyskore DLX rest...just couldn't stop myself as the concept was soooo apealing ..shot rounds and sent it back...too many moving parts, I spent more time getting things set up, then I did shooting, and it doesn't return to battery like they say...even with the custom built platform I screwed the rest into.

    Found out that my brother had a lead sled with 100lbs of shot bags...so I took it to the range...I loved it, and I was more comfortable watching the shots through the scope making sure the cross hairs were lined up where I wanted them. So now that I know he's got a lead sled, I'll probably try a front end rest with a rear bag and compare.

    Thanks again for all your help.
     
  13. budlight

    budlight Well-Known Member

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    I have the "led sled" with 80 pounds on it. 40# fly wheel and two 20 bags of shot. new scope bench rest start at 25 or 50 then when close go right to 100. walk the clicks into zero then go to 200 .


    Solid mounts are not good for higher powered rounds. 30-06 or less is fine. front and rear bag is required for higher powered rifles
     
  14. WildRose

    WildRose Well-Known Member

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    If you are flinching no matter how good your loads are you're still going to have a lot of bullets flying wild down range.

    If you are not you might as well save yourself a heck of a lot of money and put bags under the front end or a good bipod and maybe look at getting a Monopod like the accushot monopod for the rear.

    Nothing is going to lock the rifle down where it doesn't move at all and no amount of precision in your loading is going to eliminate shooter errors.

    Solve the shooter error first and you'll get there a whole lot quicker and cheaper.