shooting rest for hunting

Discussion in 'Equipment Discussions' started by Boman, Jun 6, 2005.

  1. Boman

    Boman Well-Known Member

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    Gentlemen,
    What do you guys use for a stable shooting rest while out hunting? I'm thinking most use a bipod. I want to know what make, model and length your using as well as do you guys use the swivel model or the standard non swivel. If you use something else I'd like to know that too. So let me know what your system for getting stable is.. Pictures welcome too. Thanks
     
  2. LOBO

    LOBO Well-Known Member

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    Harris bipods, no doubt. Depends on the terrain as to the length. A 13"-25", I think this is the correct length, is what I like. Being tall, I can use it prone and I can use it for sitting position. I took a antelope @ 452 yards last August from sitting w/ a bipod, so they are stable.
     

  3. Fiftydriver

    Fiftydriver <strong>Official LRH Sponsor</strong>

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    Boman,

    Where I generally hunt there is not alot of ground cover and I generally hunt in an ambush situation where I scout the animals and then set up to intercept them as they move from bedding areas to feeding area. Shots are generally quite long at times.

    I use the Harris 9-13" bipod as I shoot prone nearly 100% of the time. This bipod has allowed me to take game out to 610 yards with total confidence in teh stability of the shot.


    If your hunting in areas with more ground clutter, I agree the taller models will serve better but the taller you get, the more stability you loose. It is not alot but it is noticable.

    Good Shooting!!

    Kirby Allen(50)
     
  4. jsali

    jsali Well-Known Member

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    Harris swivel bipod 6"-9" and a sand sock/beanbag under the butt. I had the 9"-13" first but found that when shooting prone it put me too far up on my elbows, and I could not stay in that position for extended periods. That being said I have a good friend who is thicker through the chest than I am and he uses a 9"-13" with no problems. My advice is find someone who has one and try it in a field position. See how it feels, if it is high or not high enough, can you stay in that position for extended periods. Don't make the same mistake I did and grab the one that most people use, everyone is different and you may find that another model may be the one for you.
     
  5. Boman

    Boman Well-Known Member

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    Ok Thank you guys.

    Kirby do you have the swivel mode or the fixed style of Harris.

    I have the Tony Diebold shooting "sticks" They are alot like the pole cat things I see on tv. it adjust from like 25" to 48. So for cluttered areas I would use it. Thanks everyone.
     
  6. Freakshow

    Freakshow Active Member

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    Remember the 5-P's.
    I have a 9-13inch bipod on my rifle, carry shooting sticks in my patrol pack, and use my pack for a rear rest for shots on the longish side. Hell, most of the time I carry two rifles. A short carbine for close fast shots and a long range rig for precision work. You never, never know.
     
  7. Boman

    Boman Well-Known Member

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    Bravo,
    You carry two rifles for hunting? Wow man. Thanks for the input.
     
  8. goodgrouper

    goodgrouper Well-Known Member

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    The longest Harris swivel model is what I have used to kill most of my long range elk with (including my 820 yard cow elk posted here). If needed, a daypack under the butt works quite well to stabilize the bipod if your rig is up high enough to see over sagebrush or other taller ground foilage.

    I have also strapped my Benchmaster rest to my pack frame for use in my 630 yard desert sheep and my 830 yard spike elk. It is more weight to carry than the bipod, but sometimes it works very well especially if you are winded from a steep ascent.
     
  9. Guest

    Guest Guest

    Here in Kalifornia the brush is tall, sometimes 8' tall. The barley fields where the pigs feed are 2' - 3' tall.(On average) so going prone in most instances is rarely encountered. Because of this I use a Stoney Point Pole Cat bi-pod that is adjustable from 25" - 62" (I think 62"). Steady stix's work, however the pole cat is a bit more versatile and stable.
     
  10. älg

    älg Well-Known Member

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    a backpack until now has done the job..... up to 550 yds. Thinking about a harris bipod though, probably the short one.
     
  11. Boman

    Boman Well-Known Member

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    Thanks guys keep em coming..