Shooting max load bad for the rifle?

Discussion in 'Reloading' started by Alucard, Mar 31, 2005.

  1. Alucard

    Alucard Well-Known Member

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    Hey guys. I sure do have alot of questions for the 300 RUM. I was wondering, is shooting MAX loads for the bullet weight worse for the rifle as compared to shooting MIN loads for the bullet weight?

    This is for the 300 RUM, and the loads are for 168 gr bullets to 220 gr bullets. Thanks for the info guys!! /ubbthreads/images/graemlins/smile.gif
     
  2. sniper2

    sniper2 Well-Known Member

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    I have always pushed the envelope trying to get more out of my rifles sometimes more than they are suppose to give.Maximum loads are what they are.If you are shooting maximum loads in 50 degree weather you damn sure better reduce your load to shoot in warmer temperatures!!!If you are going to run max loads be sure and don't rapid fire your rifle and be sure and clean it after the firing session.There are several guys here more qualified to answer your questions than me
    maybe them will have input.
     

  3. Varmint Hunter

    Varmint Hunter Well-Known Member

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    [ QUOTE ]
    I was wondering, is shooting MAX loads for the bullet weight worse for the rifle as compared to shooting MIN loads for the bullet weight?


    [/ QUOTE ]

    YES - In that "max" loads produce more heat and pressure which invariably shortens throat life. It also greatly shortens cartridge case life as compared to "min" listed loads. Loads above "max" are detrimental to the firearm itself.

    Since very few shooters have any reliable way of determining when they are actually using a "max" load, you can bet that many shooters are unwittingly using loads that are quite a bit beyond the maximum SAAMI pressure limits eastablished for their particular cartridge.

    How many times have you read (on the net) about someone who is getting velocities well above what the loading manuals indicate. In all likelyhood, they are exceeding established maximum pressure limits. You know the saying there's no free lunch.

    I'd suggest using a good chronograph along with your reloading manual when working up loads.

    VH
     
  4. Alucard

    Alucard Well-Known Member

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    Ok, thanks alot for the info guys. I guess I will reduce the load that I am using to save some barrel wear. Thanks again!