Sendero Trigger Needs Help

Discussion in 'General Discussion' started by Mortgage Man, Dec 19, 2006.

  1. Mortgage Man

    Mortgage Man Well-Known Member

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    I went out and shot my hunting rifle this weekend and I forgot how bad the trigger is on it. I have a 300RUM Sendero and a 22-250 VSSF. When I was shooting these guns I couldn't believe how sloppy the triggers were. I also wanted to ask some of you for some advice on the senderos. I am thinking about having the action and barrel bedded and the trigger re-worked. Does anyone have some first hand experience on this and if its worth it. Also any advice to make these guns better would be great. Don't get me wrong they both shoot great but I definitely need the triggers re-worked.
     
  2. stxhunter

    stxhunter Well-Known Member

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    the trigger on my 700p was horriable to the point that i was anticiapating it to break so i installed a jewell trigger set at 1 1/2 # now when i squeze the trigger its not a waiting game
     

  3. hoghound

    hoghound Well-Known Member

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  4. Shawn Carlock

    Shawn Carlock Sponsor

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    Your trigger can be tuned by a good smith to a reasonable weight or you shell out for a new unit there are several good ones on the market. Good triggers are a must to realize the full potential of a precision rifle. The HS stocks on your rifles can benefit from a skim bed job on the action.
     
  5. Mortgage Man

    Mortgage Man Well-Known Member

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    Any idea on what the going rate would be on a trigger job and the bedding? Also who would you guys recommend? I would prefer to use someone on this site thats good and knowledgeable.
     
  6. Shawn Carlock

    Shawn Carlock Sponsor

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    I'll drop you an email.
     
  7. MU Ag Rho

    MU Ag Rho Well-Known Member

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    First off is it the first sendero or the sendero II? if it is first sendero and first vssf then snipercdountry had a good article a few months back about remmy triggers and how to adjust. the article can be found at www.snipercountry.com/Articls/RemingtonTriggers.asp
    If they are the new black fluted barrels, I don't know, haven't had my hands on one yet, but they say they are different, don't know for sure.

    Hope this helps.

    Dan
     
  8. SamSpade

    SamSpade Well-Known Member

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    Sep 21, 2004
    Remington 700 trigger adjustment

    The three adjustments are:
    1) The trigger stop (over travel).
    2) The trigger weight (pull).
    3) The sear engagement.

    On the front side of the trigger mechanism are two screws held in place with an epoxy coating. The top screw, nearest the barrel, is the Trigger Stop Screw. The bottom screw, furthest from the barrel, is the Trigger Weight Screw.

    Remove the epoxy coating from the screws.

    First set the trigger stop. Turn the Trigger Stop Screw IN 1/4 of a turn at a time. After each 1/4 turn, try the trigger. Keep doing this until the trigger will not fall. Then back the screw OUT 1/8 turn at a time until the trigger will fall again. Add 1/8 more turn OUT.

    Next, set the trigger weight. Back the bottom screw OUT 1/8 turn at a time; test the trigger after each adjustment, until you're happy with the weight of pull.

    Sear engagement is an optional step; there is usually very little or no creep from the factory. Proper Sear Engagement Is Critical To Safety! Make only very minor adjustments at a time. I have found that 1/32 of a turn makes a major difference. Back the screw out for less engagement.

    Test for potential misfiring by pounding the butt of the rifle against the floor with the barreled action installed and the firing mechanism cocked.

    Finally, give the screws and front edge of the mechanism two coats of nail polish to keep the screws from loosening.