Seating depth for fireforming

Discussion in 'Reloading' started by LRHWAL, Jul 7, 2006.

  1. LRHWAL

    LRHWAL Well-Known Member

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    When fireforming for standard cartridges (not wildcats) do you favour seating to touch the rilfing, or a jam into the lands? I realise we are just trying to keep the case head flush against the bolt face, but which of those 2 works best for you?

    I've always "seemed" okay with just touching, but how do you like to do it?

    Thanks for any input.

    Wim
     
  2. Fiftydriver

    Fiftydriver <strong>Official LRH Sponsor</strong>

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    In my experience it really does not matter much with standard chamberings. If your chamber is loose enough to require some form of case control for firing, you basically have a wildcat /ubbthreads/images/graemlins/grin.gif!!

    The bullet seated into the lands will not limit case movement forward, The bullet will start moving down the barrel long before the pressure builds enough to fully expand the case.

    In some rounds you can neck the cases up a caliber size and then back down to form a secondary shoulder to physically hold the case back against the bolt face. This is really the only way to do it. Bullets into the lands will not work well for this purpose.

    Again, in most cases this is not a concern with standard rounds, just load and shoot however you like as long as the pressures are safe.

    Good Shooting!!

    Kirby Allen(50)
     

  3. Coyoter

    Coyoter Well-Known Member

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    I'm with Fiftydriver. I fireform my .243 AI by bumping the neck up to .277 and then partial size back to .243 to the point I have to bump the gun shut just a little. I get virtually no signs of case head seperation and the rounds shoot into very impressive little groups at pretty good velocities.
    Coyoter
     
  4. LRHWAL

    LRHWAL Well-Known Member

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    Thanks for the replies.

    Wim