Scouts

Discussion in 'Backpack Hunting' started by veriest1, Nov 19, 2011.

  1. veriest1

    veriest1 Well-Known Member

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    So I'm thinking about doing it, that is, getting a "scout" rifle for woods, "mountains," and as a general truck gun for the ranch.

    I've been over to the scout rifle forums and read most of the threads and I've read Cooper's writings/musings/ramblings on the topic but want to know what this group's take on them is. I'm specifically interested in the forward mounted scope since I've really enjoyed the AR's I've shot with red dots way up front. I like the idea of doing this with a low magnification scope on a brush gun.

    I'm thinking a Leupy FXII 2.5x28 equipped with Stoney Point elevation turret so I can dial elevation if a 4-500ish yard shot presents itself (I'm not good enough at shooting in the wind yet to attempt a shot on game that'll need much windage adjustment out that far anyway). Further shots can present themselves where I hunt but if I'm going to that area I'll bring the big gun on a still morning.

    What say you? And what would the lightest rings be for the Ruger Gunsite Scout Rifle? I'm thinking Leupold makes aluminum Mark 4 rings in one inch. I really wish I could get the NF rings for it but I think reducers would negate the weight savings.
     
  2. veriest1

    veriest1 Well-Known Member

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    Seriously? Has no one considered one of these rifles for backpacking and the like? I figured this would be THE place to discuss such rifles - even if it's more of a medium range gun than long range.
     

  3. NomadPilot

    NomadPilot Well-Known Member

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    Forward mounted scopes are attractive to a niche market; I think you can do just as well with the right action-mounted optic. (My choice for my lightweight/medium range rifle is the TR24G 1-4 Accupoint. I think it accomplishes the goal of a scout without the awkward mounting.)

    Most here stick with normal scopes, hence the lack of replies. If you want a lightweight rifle (maybe like a sheep rifle), then you'll get lots of ideas, but it probably won't be a "scout" configuration.
     
  4. veriest1

    veriest1 Well-Known Member

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    Well the one thing I like about it are the sighting options for a pack rifle. Reports indicate that the iron sights are actually pretty good.

    I've been quite impressed with the forward mount red dot but if I don't like a scope in that position then some sort of lightweight 1-4 in a traditional mount will be the way to go. Fortunately the RGSR comes with both mounting options so I think I'm just going to have a go with it and some Talley Quick Detach rings.

    I like the option of creating a Hog Holocaust by mounting the long XS rail and easily having room for night vision.

    I'll report back with results....
     
  5. orion2000

    orion2000 Well-Known Member

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    I had a Rem 788 in .308Win with a scout scope for 6 to 8 years. It was mostly a gun case queen. Never used it much after initial sight in. If it had been my only rifle, would not have had any issues. But, always reached for something else when it was time to hunt.

    Traded it for a nice scope a few months back.

    Not a bad option if it is your only option. But, why limit yourself ?
     
  6. ken snyder

    ken snyder Well-Known Member

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    Scout Rifles are an extremely important personal choice. I predominantly use two types, bolt and lever. To me Scopes defeat the purpose of a scout rifle. The other hunters that I am scouting for outfit themselves differently. Some areas I prefer the short barreled 45-70 in other areas I prefer a large caliber bolt rifle with a center tang safety that wont rub open to the fire position. and that has a bolt lock that will not allow the bolt to come open without the safety being in the fire position. For me I don't see any need at all for a scope out to 350 yds with the bolt rifle, some of the guys that are quite a bit better shots than I am don't seem to have any difficulties out to quite a bit further than that. The Loggers in my area seem to prefer a 30-30 in the bottom of their tool box ( I would think that in back of the seat would be a better place but somehow they end up at the bottom of the crew box - go figure)
     
  7. mtnwrunner

    mtnwrunner Well-Known Member

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    Howdy. Well, I just took delivery of the ruger gunsite scout rifle last week being that I recently just found out they made it in left hand. Wow, it is quite the rifle.
    I had been looking for a compact rifle in a good caliber for awhile---I wanted something that I could shoot a deer or elk (or man if need be) with but also light enough to pack in the field and on a horse. And I also wanted something that I could bang around the truck. The gunsite ruger fits the bill nicely. I am going to put the Burris LRS 1 X 4 cqb illuminated reticle scope on it and hopefully in the next couple of weeks take a wolf with it. I have not had the chance to shoot it yet as the burris is 30mm and am waiting for rings. I'll let you know how it shoots.

    Randy
     
  8. veriest1

    veriest1 Well-Known Member

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    I looked at a Stainless/Walnut one at Cabela's yesterday. Beautiful gun and, contrary to some reports, the one I saw had a super smooth bolt. Judging by what I saw while I was there it's probably been pawed and cycled by half the customers that came to the gun counter. :rolleyes: Saw a Steyr scout there too and it's a lot nicer in the hand than in pictures... but that price tag is still ridiculous. If it were close to $1000 I'd have to ponder things before buying the Ruger.

    I had some gift cards to spend so I went ahead and picked a Leupy FXII 2.5x28 since I'm scheduled to pick my GSR up tomorrow. It's surprisingly bright for a 28mm objective. The glass is typical of Leupold's in in that price range and taking it out at dusk last night showed a lot of promise. A friend of mine has a VXII or III (I don't know which) but it'll be interesting to compare them side by side.

    So what are the lightest quick detach rings for this thing? Talley? I can't seem to find any aluminum ones from any manufacturer.

    Due to unforeseen circumstances I still have my buck tag so I'm anxious to give the scout a whirl before the season is over. I'd love to hear about how it serves on your wolf hunt too so let me know. :)
     
  9. silvertip-co

    silvertip-co Well-Known Member

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    since you asked...I think scout rifles are just the dumbe$t things to come along since the Browning Bo$$
     
  10. ken snyder

    ken snyder Well-Known Member

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    Hate to sound like a salesman but marketing has destroyed yet another word. Now I'm waiting for a Tactical Safari scout Rifle with an extra rail for mounting a fishing Reel. ( might not be a bad idea for a Tactical survival Safari Scout rifle) The point of a scout rifle has nothing to do with its name. If a Rifle is well suited for it's purpose call it Macaroni! My idea of a scout rifle serves a very good purpose that can not be replaced by something largely different. If a person only has 1 tool in their tool box, a crescent wrench is an outstanding choice. Now for the Salesman part, it is about features that provide me a benefit as a hunter and having more than 1 tool in the tool box!
     
  11. veriest1

    veriest1 Well-Known Member

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    silvertip: Are you sure the scout concept didn't come first? I agree with you about the BOSS. I had one and it didn't seem to make any difference.

    Ken Snyder: I'm sorry but I didn't exactly follow your post. I think you had a pretty good point about the general purpose/practical rifle/scout idea in relation to marketing but I'm not 100% sure what you were trying to say. Interestingly Cooper wasn't sold on the forward mounted scope as being a must have. Some of his "scouts" had a traditional scope. Being a bolt action, lightweight, and short enough not to get snagged on stuff were much more important to him. Most "sheep" rifles qualify according to his actual writings unless they're really long. Which isn't as big of a deal IMO.

    ========================================

    Here are my thoughts on the Ruger Gunsite Scout after putting 70 rounds through it, carrying it for 3 days around the ranch, and hunting with it a few times.

    The ergonomics are excellent. I guess that's to be expected but this is my first time messing with a Mauser-ish action of any sort (one of the reasons I wanted to try this gun out actually). Not having a scope over the action is nice if you like to shoot and play as much as I do because there's no way to pinch ones fingers between the scope and bolt handle.

    The magazine release is very convenient but for hunting I'm replacing the goofy 10 round mag with a 3 round polymer magazine. This is for legality, weight, and ease of carry. Plus the ability to top it off I guess. When it's riding around in the truck it'll keep the 10 round setup for hogs and organization.

    Accuracy is fine for a sub-600 yard gun but I could use some more practice shooting with a sling. At some point I'll put my bipod on it and see how it goes but right now I'm getting 1.5-2 MOA groups at 100 yards with Federal factory loads and a sling. All things considered I'm pretty happy with that really.

    As far as it being a crescent wrench: it shoots as well as most guns out there (if not better) and has the bonus of having excellent iron sights on it. The forward mounted scope doesn't seem to be effecting accuracy at all. It makes for a great general purpose hunting rifle and I like it much better than the .243 Browning A-bolt it replaced (which ironically enough is the gun that had one of those worthless BOSS systems on it).

    I haven't found the forward mounted scope to be awkward at all. You still go for a good consistent cheek weld, put the cross hairs on the target, and squeeze. The difference is it's easier to see the scope coming up in ones peripheral vision and line things up quickly. The handling benefits are there too but are secondary IMO - at least on a rifle with easily swapped magazines. I think a lot of people just don't like things that are different than what they're used to but next year (after my firearm allowance resets :D) I'd like to try a high end 1-4 in a reversed Larue mount on it.

    The good news is the Ruger can easily be setup however-which-way one wants and even comes with traditional mounts in the box. And that's what's so great - it's an excellent platform to work off of due to all the options afforded the end user.

    I ended up going with alloy TPS rings btw. They seem to be excellent and, according to the guys at SWFA, they have been (or are) making the rings for Badger Ordinance. No lapping was required and they're pretty stinkin' light.

    Next on the list is a thread protector to get rid of that goofy flash hider.
     
  12. BikerRN

    BikerRN Member

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    As a handy carbine and intermediate range rifle I like my Ruger Scout.

    As for the forward mounted optics, no thanks. I played with, and shot, my Scout for a year. If I was going to use a red dot optic then I'd place it in the forward position but with a scope I'll go traditional.

    I've found that while a forward mounted scope can be fast to get sight acquisition, if the sun is behind you you may not be acquisitioning anything. For fast shots at moving targets within reasonable ranges the concept has a lot of merit though, providing the sun cooperates.

    I think the biggest boon, and detriment, to the Scout concept is the non-traditional optic configuration. Iron sights on a bolt? The Gunsite Scout is A+. Forward mounted optics? F- in my opinion. Iron sights? A. Ability to configure the rifle to your sighting needs? A+++.

    If the scout configuration works for you, go for it. Me, I'm taking the rail off, plugging the holes in the barrel, that hold the rail on, and mounting a traditional 3-9 x 40. If the scope breaks I'll take it off and screw the rear sight back on. It's a handy little carbine but too much has been made of the forward optic, which is not even necessary to be a scout rifle in my opinion, and it doesn't really do anything great but does do OK for a lot of things. In short it's a good "general purpose" rifle that excells at no one task but is passable for many.

    Biker
     
  13. sten668

    sten668 Member

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    I built one up on a M96 in 6.5x55 a number of years ago, it is not so much a long range gun. I put a 2x pistol scope on it, it will shoot 2in at 200 meters from a rest. I use it for hunting in heavy timber for deer, elk and coyotes. Above timberline I will not shoot over 300yds with it. I didn't put the ghost ring or open sights on it. I have never broken a scope while hunting yet. I love being able to leave both eyes open and getting on target fast. Give it a try, if you don't like it, change it or sell it.....
     
  14. MachV

    MachV Well-Known Member

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    I bought this old sweede many years ago for the action but made the mistake of shooting it first. It shot way better than expected as the bore looks very rough. Was thinking of putting a scout scope setup on it but the original millitary sights work good enough for 300 yard shots. The trigger has a god awfull lot of creep but does let you know when its gonna go off.
    Long way around the barn here but long story short its a great truck/rivene gun that flat out works!!


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