Scope Mounting / V Blocks

Discussion in 'Equipment Discussions' started by Iam74Gibson, Oct 5, 2004.

  1. Iam74Gibson

    Iam74Gibson New Member

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    Oct 5, 2004
    Hi Everyone, I am buying my first rifle and scope so pardon me if I am asking rookie questions. I should be receiving my Tikka T3 Lite 300WSM and Nikon 3-9x40 soon. The Tikka comes with scope rings that I assume will work. I found the following instructions on Gunnersden.com.I Understand everything except entry #5...What do they mean by V Blocks? Shouldn't a brand new scope already be adjusted? Any advice is appreciated.

    Iam74Gibson

    We will start from scratch here. A brand new remington 700 bolt action rifle, millett 2 piece windage adjustable scope bases, millett scope rings and a leupold 3-9 variable power scope. (Fairly common hunting rig.)
    Now lets mount the scope the right way to achieve its full accuracy potential.
    (1) Mount the rifle in a padded vise as far away from a wall opposing the muzzle end of the rifle, the farther away the better.

    (2) Attach the scope mount base to the rifle securely.

    (3) Now take a level and lay it on the base horizontal to the rifle bore. Level the rig out in the vise and lock it down.

    (4) Attach the scope rings, make sure the scope will lay down into the rings without them moving when you go to tighten the scope into the rings.

    (5) Now take the scope and put it between 2 v blocks and spin the scope watching the crosshairs for wobble, adjust the scope to insure there is no wobble in the crosshairs, this is critical to your accuracy.

    (6) Check to make sure that your rig is still level in the vise and then set the scope in the rings.

    (7) On the opposing wall away from the rifle muzzle draw a vertical and horizontal line, again using a level to insure that the line is plumb vertically and level horizontally. It should look like a plus sign. +

    (8) Remove the bolt from the rifle, looking through the rifles bore, center the plus sign in it.

    (9) Align the vertical post in the scope with the vertical line on the wall using only the windage screws on the scope base
    (Do Not Use The Windage Screws On The Scope For This)
    and tighten down the scope rings, make sure that all stay level and plumb vertically and horizontally.
    If you have done everything correctly, you have just mounted the scope to all the exact tolerances that have been machined into all the scope mount components. Everything to its true and exact mechanical center point
    [​IMG] [​IMG] [​IMG]
     
  2. Dave King

    Dave King Well-Known Member

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    May 3, 2001
    Iam74Gibson

    #5


    (5) Now take the scope and put it between 2 v blocks and spin the scope watching the crosshairs for wobble, adjust the scope to insure there is no wobble in the crosshairs, this is critical to your accuracy.



    seems to relate to #9


    (9) Align the vertical post in the scope with the vertical line on the wall using only the windage screws on the scope base
    (Do Not Use The Windage Screws On The Scope For This)
    and tighten down the scope rings, make sure that all stay level and plumb vertically and horizontally.
    If you have done everything correctly, you have just mounted the scope to all the exact tolerances that have been machined into all the scope mount components. Everything to its true and exact mechanical center point



    "V" blocks is a device to hold the scope in place while you rotate it to allow you to center the crosshairs to mechanical (optical I guess could be better) center. Use the windage and elevation to adjust the scope so that the crosshairs don't move as the scope is rotated... thus centering the crosshair. Most folks use a cardboard box and cut a set of "V"s on the edge and then crade the scope in the "V"s.

    Once the scope is "centered" the directions state the windage should be set using the windage adjustment on the rings allowing the scope crosshair to remain as near center as possible. Doing it in this manner gives you the most available internal scope adjustment for both windage and elevation.

    Hope this helps a bit.


    Here's a link to a .pdf that explains the reason and mechanics a bit better.
    http://www.westcoasttactical.com/Common/Articles/Optics/Erector_Centering_Instructions.pdf

    [ 10-05-2004: Message edited by: Dave King ]