Scope Measurement Calculation

Discussion in 'Long Range Hunting & Shooting' started by Seven Oaks, May 22, 2009.

  1. Seven Oaks

    Seven Oaks Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    62
    Joined:
    May 10, 2009
    Was wondering if this would work and give me an accurate Scope Height measurement to enter in my Ballistics program.

    From bottom of my base (where base contacts top of reciever) of my mount to the Center line of my scope is 1.062"

    The Barrel on my gun at its largest point where it mates up even to reciever is
    1.175"

    I divided 1.175" by 2= .587" to get centerline of bore. I then added this to my other measurement of 1.062"

    I get a height of 1.649" from Centerline of bore to Center line of scope.

    Is this the correct/best method to get this measurement?

    Thanks for the help.

    Dee
     
  2. Coyboy

    Coyboy Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    2,132
    Joined:
    Jan 30, 2005
    Dee, that should work just fine.
     

  3. Eaglet

    Eaglet Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    2,779
    Joined:
    Feb 2, 2005
    The blue colored part of your post up above is where it will let it work or not. If it's flash it will work good if it's not it won't; of course you know that. Aside from that, it sounds good to me!
     
  4. MontanaRifleman

    MontanaRifleman Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    6,068
    Joined:
    May 21, 2008
    The way I figure is...

    Measure the OD of the edge of the bell of the scope at the objective end, then measure the OD of the barrel directly beneath the bell of the scope, add then and dived by 2... then measure the distance fron the top of the barrel to the bottom of the bell of the scope and add that to the previous number, that is the correct distance from center of bore to line of sight.

    If you have a tapered base(s) you should compensate for that depending on how accurate you want to be.

    -MR
     
  5. Eaglet

    Eaglet Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    2,779
    Joined:
    Feb 2, 2005
    That, also works!! Both ways should give you more than accurate results.