savage vlp and lrpv

Discussion in 'Varmint Hunting' started by sniperboy, Apr 2, 2008.

  1. sniperboy

    sniperboy Well-Known Member

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    Hi to all.

    Can anyone tell me the difference between tha savage model vlp and the lrpv. I especially want to know if the barrel of the vlp is the same as the lrpv barrel. And in the way of accuracy is one better than the other?


    Thank you
    Sniperboy
     
  2. britz

    britz Well-Known Member

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    Savage Arms Model 12 Varminter Low Profile
    the VLP is the varmint low profile. This rifle has a standard 10 action and a heavy barrel with a varmint taper

    LRPV is long range precision varmint. This rifle has a target action with a right bolt left port ( I think it is slightly more bulky and takes a fatter barrel). It also has a very heavy barrel with minimal taper. this comes either singe shot or repeater and is supposedly very accurate. It also has a HS precision stock
     
    Last edited: Apr 2, 2008

  3. LEFTYM77

    LEFTYM77 Well-Known Member

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    I know the main difference is the action, but it does not end there. they have different stocks, the lrpv has the target accutrigger, the vlp has the accutrigger that can be adjusted down to about 1.5 pounds the lrpv will go to 8oz. and yes the barrells are different the vlp has a heavy fluted and the lrpv has a super heavy straight taper non fluted the savage website has the catalog that will list the spec's. I have a vlp and it shoots great (less than .5 moa) hope this helps
     
  4. James H

    James H Well-Known Member

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    The LRPV action is more rigid and designed more like a custom action. The load/eject port is a milled port like custom actions use, as opposed the open top like most commercial actions. The LRPV also uses the larger shank barrel and the target accutrigger.

    James
     
  5. JDY

    JDY Well-Known Member

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    Feb 9, 2007
    I have a LRPV in 223 with 1:7 twist and this is one fine shooting rifle. Have shot groups under
    .2 with 25gr. of Varget and 75 gr. Amax bullets. Shot a ground hog last week @ 471 yards. The first shot hit the second missed 3'' high and shot #3 hit and he rolled down the hill.

    This is a quality built rifle the barrel is so easy to clean. After 100 shots or so the copper needs to be removed and this takes only 10 or 15 minutes.

    I like this rifle a lot
     
  6. HOGGHEAD

    HOGGHEAD Well-Known Member

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    Sep 13, 2007
    Varmint Rifle

    I went through the same thing you are going through(in December). I did not like the VLP stock. I did like the LRPV stock, but I had a hard time paying more for a Savage than a Remington. However the main advantage to the Savage is the twist rate(for what I wanted). I decided to go with the Remington, and had it rebarreled with a Krieger barrel. I will end up with a couple hundred more in it than the Savage would have been. But I think I will be happier with what I end up with. You need to handle an LRPV before you buy it. It is a real horse. Tom.
     
  7. mtbikerwvu

    mtbikerwvu Member

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    By a strange twist of fate I have one of each in .223. That is a story in and of it self. They currently share one Night Force scope and both shoot amazingly well. Different triggers set to the same pull weight and different barrel taper is about all. Oh yeah the VLP is clip fed and the LRPV is a single shot left eject. Now there's the dual port! The point is that I cannot see any differences in the shooting ability of either gun. They are both way more precise than most humans can shoot. Here's another strange fact. I can swap the scope from rifle to rifle with very little change in zero! Sadly, one must go and I cannot decide which is better. The down side is they point like a telephone pole but once you are on target it is DEAD ON ACCURATE. I will probably keep the VLP for the simple fact that it is clip fed.gun)
     
  8. bowhunthard

    bowhunthard Well-Known Member

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    Both rifles will be extremely accurate, however, for extreme2 accuracy lol I believe the LRPV has the upper hand.

    1. The action is stiffer due to the fact it only has a port in the left side to eject from. It is a bridged receiver with the feed ramp machined into the action, both of these make it stiffer. The action also attaches to the stock with 3 action screws, not just two.

    2. The barrel is a minimal-tapered full 1", no flutes.

    3. The stock is a HS Precision, with a full length aluminum bedding block.

    I have one of the right-bolt/left-port model in 22-250 1:12" twist. It's awesome. However, it is quite heavy. My gun weighs in at close to 16 lbs. with scope and bipod. As of right now tho it averages about .2 - .3" 4-shots @ 100 yds. with 52gr FB HP bullets. @ 450 yds. I shot a group of about 2" without correcting for wind (the group height was .79", it was spread out on the horizontal).

    I have a review for my rifle @: Savage model 12 long range precision.

    Although, they now make a LRPV with a detatchable box magazine. Just some food for thought.

    Good luck.
     
    Last edited: Jan 11, 2010
  9. texasgunner

    texasgunner Member

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    Ok, Guys,
    I could use a little help also, am buying a savage Mod 12 , not sure if want
    the 1 in 9 twist or 1 in 12 . If someone could help with the pros and cons of
    each. I go like to shoot 52gr. but that could change.
     
  10. bowhunthard

    bowhunthard Well-Known Member

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    The 1:12" twist will be good for bullets under 60 gr. The 1:9" would be best for the heavier bullets (60 - 80grs., high BCs for long range accuracy) such as the 75gr. A-MAX. The 1:9" should also be ok for the lighter bullets provided that they are rated for higher velocities (higher twist rate = heavier jackets).

    Good luck.