??'s for the electronic scale folks

Discussion in 'Reloading' started by gray wolf, Oct 16, 2011.

  1. gray wolf

    gray wolf Active Member

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    Hello men,
    I hope you can answer a little question I have about scales.
    I was looking at the Gem pro 250 scale from My Weigh.
    They say it will measure grains to .05 and grams to .001, While I am sure that .05 is good enough for an average reloader I was wondering ?
    If someone had all the grain to gram weights printed out would you get a more accurate reading if you used the .001 gram function and took advantage of the extra decimal point. I can't seem to get my head around this.

    Thank you for any help with this.

    GW.
     
  2. loaders_loft

    loaders_loft Well-Known Member

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    Google does conversions too.

    1 gram (g) = 15.4 grains

    .001 gram = .0154 grain

    .0032 gram = .05 grain

    that said, if you're having trouble making the conversions to start with, then using the gram function with will undoubtedly screw you up sooner or later.

    Go with the grain units. If you find the sweet spot, small variations won't matter anyway...
     

  3. gray wolf

    gray wolf Active Member

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    No I am not having any problem doing the conversions, they are printed out right in front of me.

    I have all the printed sheets for the conversions, My question was is it more accurate to use the three decimal readout .001 in Grams? in stead of .02 grains.

    if I weighed 10.2 grains it would show 10.20 grains as a posed to 0.660 grams. or 32.20 grains as a posed to 2.086 grams.
    I am not worried about the confusion factor, I only load 4 or 5 different calibers.
    so does the extra decimal in the gram mode add to the accuracy of the weighed charge ?
     
    Last edited: Oct 16, 2011
  4. boomtube

    boomtube Well-Known Member

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    The pure accuracy of the scale will be identical, all that changes is the display.
     
  5. loaders_loft

    loaders_loft Well-Known Member

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    did you look at the numbers I posted above?
     
  6. gray wolf

    gray wolf Active Member

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    I had to look at it three times to see what you were trying to tell me.
    It's making sense to me now. Most times I can get things pretty quick,
    Don't know why this was a stump-er for me.
    I think I will stay with my RCBS 505 and keep weighing by the .1 of a grain

    Thank you
     
    Last edited: Oct 16, 2011
  7. nheninge

    nheninge Well-Known Member

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    Oct 20, 2008
    The resolution is the same.

    grams grains
    1.105 17.05275603
    1.106 17.06818839
    1.107 17.08362075
    1.108 17.09905311
    1.109 17.11448547

    The only thing that changes is the scales rounding error. Grams are just a "bigger" unit than grains. Using different conversions just introduces a whole new way to screw up! Don't bother.

    None of this will make a difference if you can't dope the wind. You might miss by tenths of an inch in theory, but miss by feet in real life:D
     
  8. twiedenh

    twiedenh Well-Known Member

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    I have a real cheap lyman electronic scale and i'm keeping my fps deviation to 15 fps or better. I generally just double weigh every load. It's a little finicky but I have figured out how to get the most out of it for what I do. If I was loading more than 20 or 40 cases a time I would have to get something easier and faster but for now, I can deal with it. So you should be fine.
     
  9. meatyrem

    meatyrem Well-Known Member

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    Actually I am looking at this same scale. It is actually accurate to.02gr (2/100th) it is the gempro 500 that is accurate to .05gr. It is the same accuracy whether it's grams or grains.
     
    Last edited: Oct 18, 2011