Rounds per Powder Case

Discussion in 'Reloading' started by KRob, May 25, 2005.

  1. KRob

    KRob Well-Known Member

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    I am trying to figure if it is worth getting a reloading set up.
    For a 223 how many reloads could I get out of one bottle of powder? Same question for 30-30 and 300 win mag.
     

  2. 4ked Horn

    4ked Horn Writers Guild

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    There are 7000 grains per pound so if your load is 26 grains you can get 269.23 loads from a pound.

    $17.00 for 269 rounds is $0.063 a round for the powder.

    7000 divided by load in grains equals loads per pound.
    Cost per pound divided by loads per pound equals cost per load.
     

  3. KRob

    KRob Well-Known Member

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    Thanks,
    I am having trouble with my email and cant get a return off to you but it will be on it way soon; dont think me ungreatful.
     
  4. 4ked Horn

    4ked Horn Writers Guild

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    Take your time. Computers are strange like that. My email quit loading for 3 or 4 days with no explanation and then started working just as quickly.

    If you visit the Midway website and look for winchester bulk bullets for the .223 you will find them to be quite inexpensive if you buy 200 or 500 at a time. The once used mix .223 brass is also very reasonable. You should be able to load a zillion rounds that would fit your needs for accuracy and cost. You mentioned that a good share of your shooting was walking and plinking so you don't need high end components. Your accuracy will come from being able to adjust your powder for your gun.

    The big clincher is the initial outlay for the reloading gear. Again, you don't need high dollar dies and what not to meet the needs you described but get a good press and a good scale and don't underestimate the value of a case tumbler. A small to medium sized one will do but it will save you tons of time cleaning your dirty brass. Lastly I would say, with great importance, plan ahead. Buy a system that will let you grow and that gives you good flexibility. Spend the money on the future or you will constantly be wishing you had bought something better.

    You will find that you can make up the cost of the reloading gear in money saved over the cost of factory ammo but it might take a few years depending on how much you shoot. The fastest rewards will be (possibly greatly) improved accuracy and the pride of shooting something (or many somethings ) with ammo you made to your choosing for your gun.

    And remember, Safety first and consistancy is better than speed. Finding a consistantly predictable load in safe pressures is much better than squirting molten lead at dangerous pressures.
     
  5. KRob

    KRob Well-Known Member

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    [ QUOTE ]

    And remember, Safety first and consistancy is better than speed. Finding a consistantly predictable load in safe pressures is much better than squirting molten lead at dangerous pressures.

    [/ QUOTE ]
    How would i find the pressure and know if the loads are safe or not.
     
  6. 4ked Horn

    4ked Horn Writers Guild

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    Start by reading the safety section of any reputable <u>instructional</u> reloading manual like the one from Sierra or Speer. Hodgdon makes little recipie books with some safety precautions but the others have instructions and fully explain the propper reloading process. READ THE WHOLE THING. It will tell you what things might indicate excessive pressures.

    Next, don't load a single kernell of powder in a case if you don't have a published recipie for it using a very comparable bullet. When you learn more you may want to venture into the area of developing loads from sugested recipies and may even go on to develop loads on your own but for now I would say if you don't read in in a respectable load book then don't trust your vision and/or life to the load.

    FYI steel has a tensile strength of about 70,000 PSI. Many rounds generate 40,000 to 50,000 PSI and can climb much higher quickly if you don't follow the rules. This is regardless of the case size. For example: a .22 high velocity rimfire round often develops more pressure than a .44 mag.

    The information is available for the reading both here on the internet and in book form. It will be time well spent.

    (Did you notice that I didn't give you a quick and easy answer? It is something you should spent some time studying before you start throwing powder.)
     
  7. 7Rumloader

    7Rumloader Well-Known Member

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    You can find loads listed in manuals from different manufacturers and they list starting points and max loads. You generally start at starting points and work up in small increments watching for pressure signs like cratered primers and other signs. Here is another link for a book on the ABC's of reloading that will teach you all the signs and some techniques. The Lyman kit includes their big manual which covers a lot of the basics in the first part of the manual.
    Hope this helps!
    Dangit 4ked you beat me! /ubbthreads/images/graemlins/mad.gif /ubbthreads/images/graemlins/grin.gif
    Maybe next time! /ubbthreads/images/graemlins/wink.gif
     
  8. KRob

    KRob Well-Known Member

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    Thanks I think i might take a trip to the book store tomorow. I had flipped through a couple of the handbooks but all the ones i saw really did not have a adiquit section to begin with explaining everything. Safty a big thing to me...i've spent some time on my back layed up and i really dont want to go up to that city in the clouds quit yet so.
    Thanks
     
  9. KRob

    KRob Well-Known Member

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    [ QUOTE ]

    This is regardless of the case size. For example: a .22 high velocity rimfire round often develops more pressure than a .44 mag.


    [/ QUOTE ]
    Please explain a little, however i am going to venture a guess. Is it because of the barrel length.
     
  10. 4ked Horn

    4ked Horn Writers Guild

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    7Rum. I type with my two trigger fingers at about 25 words per minute so I rarely beat anyone. I will enjoy this moment for a few minutes.

    Two concurring posts can't be bad either. I saw that you have the Lyman kit as a reloading tools base nad I have the RCBS master kit as mine. I think both of our answers are relevant in regards to the different brands.


    Robins. I would shy away from progressive presses at this time. When your reloading can't keep up with your shooting you might then take a look at this option. It's almost a given that someone will dissagree with that point but at this point I would look for safety and quality over quantity. Progressive presses poop out ammo fast but there are many things to get set just right and many things to watch for as the loading goes along that might be a touch overwhelming in this stage of your reloading journey.
     
  11. 7Rumloader

    7Rumloader Well-Known Member

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    25 words a minute!! /ubbthreads/images/graemlins/shocked.gif /ubbthreads/images/graemlins/shocked.gif Wheeww thats smokin compared to me! I might knock out 25 or 30 on a good day I mean really good day! /ubbthreads/images/graemlins/wink.gif Yea its good to have input on both kits at the same time. I too would suggest shying away from a progressive until you gain experience.
     
  12. KRob

    KRob Well-Known Member

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    YOu brought up something i've been woundering about. I know what a single stage press is and a prgressive but what is a turret press. Even better would be if you could take a minute and explain the benifits and disadvantages to the three systems.
     
  13. 4ked Horn

    4ked Horn Writers Guild

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    Ok one more quick response then I gotta go. I'm sure others will have some good input as well.

    Single stage is often a stronger and more consistant press but the slowest to use when loading a number of rounds. You can taylor your loading process to become VERY ACCURATE.

    Progressive presses are fastest when loading a number of rounds but they are more time consuming to set up for a few rounds and tend to be for pumping out bulk loads. The repetition is deceptive in that it seems to be doing the same thing over and over but the loads will be less consistant and with that goes your accuracy gained by quality reloading methods.

    Turret presses are a hybrid of both ideas. Some may say it is the best of both worlds and others will say they don't do either job well.

    Concerning your pressure of the .22 and the .44. It all has to do with the burn rate of the powder and the relative mass of the bullet compared to the diameter of the bullet and a fist full of other things. And the peak pressure occurs before the bullet has moved an inch (or so) so BBL length has little to do with it.
     
  14. 7Rumloader

    7Rumloader Well-Known Member

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    A turret press is inbetween a single stage and a progressive press as far as speed goes. The turrets have 3 or 4 stations to hold your sizing die, your seating die and a neck sizing die if you have one and if it's a 4 station you can mount your powder dispencer there. The advantage of a turret over a single stage is once you get all your dies set in their locations on the turret plates you dont have to move them again only rotate the turret to the die you need for that operation. The disadvantage is you have to buy extra turrets for different calibers. I personally feel that once a turret design starts to wear your ammo quality will begin to suffer due to the design of the system. I dont know if it's for sure and possibly I'm wrong for thinking that but it won't be the first time.
    The main advantage of a progressive is speed and # of rounds you can turn out in less time but it's more complex to operate and for a beginner it may overwhelm you to the point you give up on it. A good single stage press is about the best way to start out in my opinion.

    Dangit 4ked you beat me again! /ubbthreads/images/graemlins/mad.gif /ubbthreads/images/graemlins/mad.gif /ubbthreads/images/graemlins/grin.gif