Rifle accurizing....opinions?

Discussion in 'The Basics, Starting Out' started by jthogfan, Mar 3, 2012.

  1. jthogfan

    jthogfan Member

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    Here's the situation...I have a Remington 700 LSS in a 7mm RUM. I got this thing when I was a kid as a present and I was caught up in the hoopla of "super magnums". Neither my dad nor I knew enough about guns to really make an educated decision.

    I'm currently shooting a .270 win, which is fine for where I hunt but I'm getting tired of this 7mm RUM collecting dust, so I'm thinking of trying to squeeze a little more accuracy out of it.

    My main question is what is my first step in this process? A lead sled and tuned trigger would help me trim my groups down, but free floating, pillar bedding, and glass bedding all seem to be inevitable in trying to make this rifle as accurate as possible. Just looking for some advice, thanks!
     
  2. Derek M.

    Derek M. Well-Known Member

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    Well, typically, a trigger pull reduction to 2 pounds or less is a big help IMO. Secondly, and also my opinion, I don't subscribe to bedding factory stocks other than wood as most are referred to as "tupperware." I'd take a wood stock pillar/skim bedded over the plastic stocks but I'm not familiar with what your rifle came with.

    Many factory remington bbl will shoot fine, many will not. I'd start with a trigger and bedding job unless you are willing to sink some money into this thing and rebarrel it with a handlapped button or cut barrel and get the action trued. At that point, restocking is just as prudent.

    Good luck with whatever route you take.
     

  3. screech

    screech Well-Known Member

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    I had the same gun in a 300 rum. I blue printed it, bedded it and put a jewel on it and while it did help it still wasnt satisfactory. A new krieger gave it a new life and it shoots great
     
  4. bigngreen

    bigngreen Well-Known Member

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    Are you reloading and how is the gun set up now?
     
  5. jthogfan

    jthogfan Member

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    No I am not reloading. I would like to get into it eventually, but I can't justify spending the start up money on it right now. I know it would definitely be cheaper in the long run, but I'm a beginner at this and I'm really wanting to use this rifle as an experience to gain a little knowledge andeventually move on to some more ambitious projects.

    As for the rifle, it's sitting in the factory laminated stock now. Honestly, I haven't shot it in 5 or 6 years because the lease I'm at now is pretty much all river bottoms whereas before I was on large clear cuts and long pipelines.
     
  6. grit

    grit Well-Known Member

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    Start with the basics. You have a good laminate stock. Pillar bed, free float the barrel, tune the trigger. And get a brake on it!

    At this point, load development is next. If you're using factory loads, you can try a few.

    Frankly, the 270 is a much better round to develop skills with.
     
  7. johnnyk

    johnnyk Well-Known Member

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    To me the economical route would be a trigger tune first. If the recoil is unbearable, which I feel it would be for me, a muzzle break would be in order. I don't own any rifles with MB's but if I dread pulling the trigger I'm not concentrating on the target. My 12lb .300WinMag is uncomfortable after 15 rounds.
    These first two are designed to let you see what kind of accuracy you can wring from the stock barrel. Not sure if you're defeating the purpose by shooting factory ammo. I have heard that in some instances installing MB's increases accuracy but I'm skeptical.
    If after this your returns are promising, then I would bed (pillar&epoxy) and float the barrel. This will in most cases increase accuracy a little but will also provide a more stable platform and let the system "repeat" if you will.
    You may never realize the full potential of your rifle with factory fodder, then again you may find something it likes. Could get costly buying different brands, weights, etc. Just save your brass for when you finally decide to cut your losses and start reloading. :)
    Good luck and let us know which route you take. JohnnyK.
     
  8. roninflag

    roninflag Well-Known Member

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    a krieger barrel is the fastest and cheapest way to accuracy. a 308 espcially a heavy barrel would kick less and be less finicky . the lss is a stout rifle . i would not consider shooting it unless it had vais brake installed and muff and puffs.
     
  9. jthogfan

    jthogfan Member

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    It looks like it's just 310 from the website for a .284. It looks like with having it installed on my action and installing a muzzle break I'm getting pretty close to a new Remington Sendero. I've read that the 7mm RUM wears barrels out relatively fast...so if I was going to spend that much wouldn't I be better off building a rifle on a 7mm Rem mag which would certainly be cheaper and easier to find an equally accurate factory round on? I think right now I want to use the factory barrel in an effort to save money.

    By the way, thanks for all the feedback guys. A lot of these comments are just confirming what I have been reading about.
     
  10. jtkratzer

    jtkratzer Well-Known Member

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    After shooting reloads today for the first time through any firearm, I'm thoroughly convinced that it is one of the most important aspects of accuracy. Sure, optics, a tuned trigger, etc are all important, but as long as everything else is functional (scope properly mounted, barrel not jacked up, etc), feeding the rifle what it likes to eat is going to do wonders. Feeding a match grade, custom fit barrel factory ammo kind of defeats the purpose of spending that kind of money with the smith. You could easily get set up to reload for the cost of rebarreling a rifle.
     
  11. rscott5028

    rscott5028 Well-Known Member

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    Start with a brake.

    Better yet, sell the RUM and put the money into fixing up the 270.

    -- richard
     
  12. grit

    grit Well-Known Member

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    Exactly. That 7 Rum would buy you a new barrel and action truing. Or reloading, or nice glass...
     
  13. jthogfan

    jthogfan Member

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    I have definitely thought of that. There just aren't a lot of people in the market for a 7 RUM....because of the things we've discussed here.
     
  14. roninflag

    roninflag Well-Known Member

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    selling the LSS for 500 or so and getting a sendero in 7mm rem mag sendero.