1. Iron Worker

    Iron Worker Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    1,759
    Joined:
    Apr 3, 2004
    Well went out there today,setting up my stand and I look over a couple Rocks I was going to sit against and there was a large male hunting 75yds from me. Nailed him 1st Coyote of the season ! I need to re-read instructions on how to post pictures. Next question this coyote had a nice coat but not as nice as a Winter coyote so I left it lay to return to nature. How soon can I hunt the same spot again ? 10 minutes after this dog another came charging in but must of seen me and kicked in its afterburners I fired a bunch of shots but didn't connect.3rd coyote I've seen after two visits. This is a good spot............. Also heard a few other coyotes in a pack giving short howling barks,wonder if those were warning barks to fellow pack members ?
     
  2. tt35

    tt35 Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    583
    Joined:
    Jun 10, 2010
    This may seem a little strange but if you kill every coyote that shows up on a given stand (assuming your set-up allows you to see most responses), the stand can be good and stay good to call every couple of weeks. If you miss a coyote or two or if they wind you, you should let it rest longer between sets. I try to not call a stand more than two or three times a winter if I have options. There's no hard and fast rule. Hope that makes sense.
     

  3. Iron Worker

    Iron Worker Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    1,759
    Joined:
    Apr 3, 2004
    That makes perfect sense ? I went out today I set up about a 1/2 mile and over a rocky desert hill from where I was Monday. Nothing ! But after 25 minutes of calling way out there I think two different packs held choir practice for a few minutes. I glassed and glassed I couldn't see any movement. I wonder if i should of packed up and hiked in that direction and tried some more ? They could've been a mile away as a crow flies ?
     
  4. tt35

    tt35 Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    583
    Joined:
    Jun 10, 2010
    It's perfectly legitimate to move towards coyotes you hear but that don't respond. Sometimes you are outside of the coyote's home area. Sometimes they may have a full belly and don't want to come that far. When you get closer, the territorial response kicks into gear. You'll need to have a reasonable chance of getting closer without being detected of course which depends on the wind and the terrain. Good luck!
     
  5. Iron Worker

    Iron Worker Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    1,759
    Joined:
    Apr 3, 2004
    So in Coyote society they have boundaries ? ? They can't run around freely ?
     
  6. tt35

    tt35 Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    583
    Joined:
    Jun 10, 2010
    It depends on the time of year to some extent. Winter and spring (mating and denning seasons) are the most intense as far as territoritality goes but, yes, coyotes have some pretty distinct boundaries at times. I've had them come in until they got to a fence and then they acted as if it were a hot wire. They stopped and wouldn't come any further. I've seen them refuse to leave a large (hundreds of acres) pasture. The fences again acted as a boundary. If you can get inside the territory they claim and defend, you can usually get a good response whether they are hungry or not. I called and shot a large coyote in one of the pastures behind my house that had a whole jackrabbit in his stomach. He was not coming to the call because he was hungry. So, the boundaries can work for you or against you.
     
  7. Iron Worker

    Iron Worker Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    1,759
    Joined:
    Apr 3, 2004
    Thanks for info. Do you wash your camos in any thing special ? Some thing about they see things we don't ? Sent control we can't fool them right ? Isn't it about hunting with the wind in our face ?
     
  8. MHO

    MHO Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    600
    Joined:
    Dec 28, 2010
    IMO always keep the wind right but take advantage of the wash and spray down before entering no matter what your hunting. I do think they help. I really like the DDW evolve series.
     
  9. tt35

    tt35 Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    583
    Joined:
    Jun 10, 2010
    You've got good questions! Your predator hunting future is probably bright!

    Here's my take. Someone else may have some experience that contradicts this but...it is generally becoming common knowledge that "brighteners" in detergents will cause your camo to be more visible to animals. I don't know how to confirm it but I avoid it. "Better safe than sorry."

    I go middle of the road on scent control. I don't use Scent-lok clothing. (I will when I can hold my breath for an entire stand.) I do however use unscented detergent to wash my camo. Similarly, I avoid highly scented shampoo and soap. I'm not convinced that scent killer sprays will be effective enough for coyotes. That said, I know very effective callers who do use all these products.

    You are on the right track that watching the wind direction is the key. I don't, however, always face the wind. In fact, I try to be able to keep an eye on the downwind because a savvy coyote will many times go downwind before coming into the call. If he makes it downwind, you just educated another coyote. My thinking is "make him show himself if he wants the downwind." Keep analyzing your set-ups and how they play out. You'll be getting more and more consisitent results as you go along.
     
  10. yotehunter73

    yotehunter73 Active Member

    Messages:
    30
    Joined:
    Feb 1, 2011
    If the wind is always in your face you wont see the coyotes that come in on the downwind side 99% of them do. I like setting up where I can see down wind. Good luck out there.