Removing old bedding: Best way?

Discussion in 'Gunsmithing' started by LRHWAL, Feb 26, 2010.

  1. LRHWAL

    LRHWAL Well-Known Member

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    So I paid good money for a less than good job and will need to redo this after the hunting season (in South Africa, so after Sep).

    I gues I can use a chisel, a Dremel, heat it up a bit with a borrowed hair dryer (don't have much hair myself :D) and scrape it out or?

    Anyone with experience on the most painless way to do this? Thanks!

    Stock is a McM, not sure about what the bedding compound is, but it is sort of a transparent slighlty yellowish colour... lloks like heat could get it soft.
     
  2. Savagebien

    Savagebien Well-Known Member

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    well it sounds like if its transparent that its probably brownells acragel or acraglas, which i do not like to use for bedding a rifle. it sounds like that because lots of times when its real thin you can see through it and it will chip out and it just doesnt do a good job really. i would probably try to use some jerry fisher stock scrapers, you can get them from brownells or if you have an old hacksaw blade, grind the teeth off and then use that to scrape it out. then, redo it with devcon, the steel putty type, i absolutely love it for bedding, it never gets air bubbles and always works great, and its very strong. use acetone or mineral spirits to clean the stock before you do the new bed job too.
     

  3. Fitch

    Fitch Well-Known Member

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    Sounds like it might be AcraGLAS. I used it on a few rifles. I like the steel filled Devcon 10110 a "lot" better.

    If I didn't have access to a milling machine, I'd use a Foredom tool with carbide bit, or a similar tool with carbide bit and carve it out of there. Don't run the tool too fast. Wear a face shield. Get a shop vac and have it handy.

    It will carve best when it is room temperature or colder. If you heat it up and make it gummy you will have a mess.

    Look for a Drill press if you have to drill out the pillars.

    After you get it carved out with the bit, some hand sanding to clean up the edges and you will be good to go.

    Richard Franklin has an excellent Bedding video in which he beds two rifles. In the second one on the video he redoes a bedding job on an old rifle using handtools. He uses a small chisel and mallet, and a Dremel with a sanding drum to cut out the old bedding. It comes out looking really good given what he had to start with.

    Fitch
     
  4. coyotezapper

    coyotezapper Well-Known Member

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    Dremel tool is fairly fast and easy to use. Just take it slow because a dremel can run away from you at times. I also recommend Devcon 10110.
     
  5. Chas1

    Chas1 Well-Known Member

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    If you know anyone that has sculpture wood chisels and wouldn't mind loaning one to you, the 1" straight Gouge works well but, if the chisel edge is like new sharp be careful as it will take some wood out pretty fast.
     
  6. LRHWAL

    LRHWAL Well-Known Member

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    Thanks for the replies.

    I'll report back some months hence and let you know how it worked out!

    WAL
     
  7. Catfish

    Catfish Well-Known Member

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    I just did one with a Dremel. As long as you have a good sharp cutting toll you can do it pretty fast. A dull tool will really slow you down. I started with a dull tool and was getting agervated, bought a new one and was done in a couple minitues.
     
  8. LRHWAL

    LRHWAL Well-Known Member

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    Catfish, as this worked for you, what type of tool did you use? Thanks.