remington VTR or SPS Varmint in 22-250???

Discussion in 'Rifles, Bullets, Barrels & Ballistics' started by joshua99ta, Feb 24, 2010.

  1. joshua99ta

    joshua99ta Well-Known Member

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    Hey guys I'm thinking about going to pick up either a VTR or SPS varmint this week... I like the look of the VTR's triangular barrel. But I like the 26" of the SPS varmnit better.

    I'm just picking this rifle up for a play around rifle do shoot around the house, pop some foxes, bobcats and plinking over the hunter, may do some 400 yardish plinking or something but thats all. Reason I'm not going to try to get a wildcats or something is I can pick up rather cheap and shoot all day... throw the cases in the polisher and put em in a bucket and after I get a several hundred built up I'll pick through and reload some.

    This will be a rifle thats going to be shot often... probably at least a couple times a day for 14 days out of the month(I work a 14 day on and 14 day off schedule in the gulf)... and of coarse it'll get shot more than that some days but a minumimum of 5 a day.
     
  2. Kiwi Nate

    Kiwi Nate Well-Known Member

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    Sorry, hope I haven't left this too late for you.

    I have done quite exhaustive testing with the VTR and if my tests prove anything, it is that the previous research and tests performed by others towards an optimum brake is correct. A muzzle brake should have its ports at either 3 and 9 oclock or all the way around. The link below is a great insight into brake design and effects:

    http://www.rvbprecision.com/shooting/adventures-with-muzzle-brakes.html

    In the VTR, as pressure builds and the brake begins to work, accuracy deteriorates. The effect is worsened with changes to slow burning powders. As an example, Varget was too slow for the .308 VTR I tested (made the brake work) and a faster powder acheived better results- up to a point. Once the brake began to work, groups opened up to 1MOA and greater.

    The other aspect is the stock, very soft and flexible on both the VTR and SPS. That said, the longer and heavier barrel of the SPS varmint dampens a lot of vibration, resulting in superior accuracy from an un-beeded stock- not that you should leave such a rifle unbedded. The 26" barreled .22-250 SPS Varmint tends to shoot sub MOA out of the box so I think this will be your best starting point. If you don't like the barrel length, you can have it cut down later. If you get the VTR, you are stuck with the barrel set up until you can afford to rebarrel.

    Hope that helps.

    Nathan.
     
    Last edited: Feb 26, 2010

  3. 700xcr

    700xcr Well-Known Member

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    I have the Remington 700 SPS Varmint in 223rem. and it is a shooter out of the box. Only thing I have done so far is a trigger adjustment and barrel break-in proceedure. I have hit targets out to 400yds. If you are not a reloader a 223rem would be cheaper.gun)
     
  4. Sharpshooter243

    Sharpshooter243 Well-Known Member

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    I would go with the SPS have one in 243 after playing with loads shoots .5 at 100yd and just alittle over 3" at 550yd
     
  5. bowhunthard

    bowhunthard Well-Known Member

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    I have the .308 VTR, the accuracy is phenomenal. The only beefs I had with it are the stock and the trigger (same stock and trigger are on the SPS). I replaced the trigger with a 1-1/2 to 4 lb. Timney. Here's a review if you are interested: Remington model 700 VTR.

    If you're getting it in 22-250 the brake probably won't make a difference, but the rifle will be lighter.
     
  6. 700xcr

    700xcr Well-Known Member

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    Not saying Timiney triggers are bad. But why did you not change weight of pull spring and adjust trigger? The X-Mark triggers are Stainless steel. Mine breaks like glass at 2Ibs. and no creep. Saved myself $100.00
     
  7. 700xcr

    700xcr Well-Known Member

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    If stuck on the 22-250 I would choose the 26" barrel over a 20" in this cartridge. Would be too much velocity lost with the shorter barrel length. Then you just might as will get a 223rem.lightbulb
     
  8. joshua99ta

    joshua99ta Well-Known Member

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    thats fellas! I'm gunna look around for myself a sps! I like the longer barrel. Some people don't like long barrels... I think they look better around 26-30"... I just dont think shorter barrels even look cool, even though looks isnt a BIG deal to most... I want something that looks good and performs even better.

    I am kind of stuck on the 22-250... I have been flip flopping for a while between a 220 swift and the 22-250 and well I'm gunna go with the 22-250
     
  9. 700xcr

    700xcr Well-Known Member

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  10. bowhunthard

    bowhunthard Well-Known Member

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    Not trying to be a jerk lol, but did you read my review? I adjusted the X-Mark down to about 3.5 lbs., after that, the safety didn't work! I'm not going to waste my time playing with a safety issue, especially when the minimum "safe" weight of the trigger was about 6 lbs.

    The Timney was a big difference (1 lb. 12 oz.)! Not saying ALL the X-Mark triggers are bad, but when I talked to Remington, the tech said that the MINIMUM trigger pull weight can vary as much as 1.5 - 6.5 lbs. Where's the quality control in that?
     
    Last edited: Mar 1, 2010
  11. Kiwi Nate

    Kiwi Nate Well-Known Member

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    I don't know why Rem changed to the X-Pro trigger, it can be a problematic unit. I have one which is adjusted down to 2lb and works fine regarding safety transition, no slam fire with fast cycling, no problems if the gun is bounced off the floor via the recoil pad. I have had others that were difficult to work with. I had one that shattered as I removed the action from the stock- that was a real surprise. I sent it to our Rem importer in NZ but he wasn't interested in helping so I had to replace the whole unit. The X-Pro trigger itself isn't made from 400 series stainless. Its some kind of brittle tool steel, cast in a mold.

    A good aftermarket trigger spring from Wolf is probably one of the better ways to keep the X-Pro safe at 2-3lb. Hard to explain but if you can bare with me- the rigger needs plenty of spring in it yet still be light. If the standard Rem spring is adjusted till its down light, there is sometimes simply not enough spring engagement to push the trigger back into place so that it engages the sear.