Remington 700 Firing Pin Spring (do they wear out?)

Discussion in 'General Discussion' started by AJ Peacock, Mar 5, 2007.

  1. AJ Peacock

    AJ Peacock Well-Known Member

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    All,

    I was wondering does the spring on a Rem700 need replaced every so often?

    The rifle I'm wondering about is on its second barrel and has been my 'go to' rifle since 1979. Probably has 6-8000 rounds through it total (probably more). Other than being taken apart and cleaned 3 times in the last 27 years, the spring is 'as delivered'.

    Thoughts?

    I've read about aftermarket springs etc. It's probably better to leave good enough alone. The rifle shoots well under 1/2 MOA when I do my part.

    Thanks,
    Don
     
  2. Fiftydriver

    Fiftydriver <strong>Official LRH Sponsor</strong>

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    If your getting good positive firing pin impacts on the primer and no sign of any missfires or hangfires I would not worry about changing your spring.

    Only time I have seen an old striker spring get week was when a couple were included in a batch of hot blueing(not smart) and in a couple other old rifles that had been stored cocked for many years.

    Other then that I have never seen a problem with them getting so week they need to be replaced.

    Kirby Allen(50)
     

  3. onzah

    onzah Well-Known Member

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    Since you mentioned it i have to ask, i have never made it a practice to dry fire or uncock bolt guns before putting them away. Should i make it part of my regular routine or is the problem negligible and very rare?
     
  4. AJ Peacock

    AJ Peacock Well-Known Member

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    [ QUOTE ]
    Since you mentioned it i have to ask, i have never made it a practice to dry fire or uncock bolt guns before putting them away. Should i make it part of my regular routine or is the problem negligible and very rare?

    [/ QUOTE ]

    I have always relieved the spring pressure on my Rem700's. I just let the spring down softly with the bolt or sometimes just dry-fire it to relieve the tension.

    Don
     
  5. dbhostler

    dbhostler Well-Known Member

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    Snap-caps if you're worried about dry firing.
    db
     
  6. Black Diamond 408

    Black Diamond 408 Well-Known Member

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    All springs will shorten with time, in the compressed state. Most bolt action rifles have more spring tension than is needed from the start. Too much tension on a firing pin can cause rifles to misteriously not perform. It has been noted on some actions heavy springs cause groups to open up. The only thing i would keep in check is the spring and pin assembly should be kept clean, lightly oiled with a non freezing type. Most rifle failures occur from bolts that haven't been cleaned for a long time, the oil will turn to a sticky varnish and in cold weather the missfires will happen. Numerous rifles were returned to my shop for warrenty and repairs from Rem. I never replaced a single spring the whole time. BUT, if you remove your spring and lay it next to a new one, i will bet you its shorter. Not the same subject but related, Rem 1100 shotguns, Browning A5's all have one thing in common, springs...when these start to have problems its due to springs. I have seen the A5 shotgun recoil spring shrink by 3" just from being compressed over the years. I allway tell the guys, when your gun is resting, loosen the forarm and take the pressure of the spring. Allways store your bolt rifles or any rifle for that matter with the hammer or pin dropped.

    Many years of experience fixing problems


    Dave