Rem 700 SA or Sako L579 as base for 243AI....

Discussion in 'Rifles, Bullets, Barrels & Ballistics' started by LRHWAL, Mar 20, 2008.

  1. LRHWAL

    LRHWAL Well-Known Member

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    I've got a Rem 700 SA in 243 - an older model that I bought from a friend. The stock is not great and is quite short (maybe shortened) in the fore-end with a barrel band sling swivel (if that's a configuration anyone's ever seen). Anyhow, that's not really the point, but I wanted to build a 243 AI and figured this would be a good base to start from, particularly as the 700 is like the 1911A1 of the rifle world with all sorts of aftermarket bits avaialble all over; stocks, magazine boxes, triggers, action dress up's etc. The idea was to build a medium weight 21 or 22" rig that I could carry around pretty easily.

    I ran into a Sako Forester L579, also in 243, yesterday available at a good price. I've always liked Sako's and now I'm a bit torn. I thought that may be good base to work off too and the stock is a lot better, as I suspect I'd need to swap out the Rem stock, but then assuming someone will ship to me, there are pretty cheap replacement's available in the US from what I've seen.

    I've run into "issues" with a Sako M995 before though, as everything that I wanted to do was really limited as to souces and choice - even for stuff like a stock.

    I'd probably swap out the barrel in due course anyway, so the condition of the barrel isn't too much of a factor.

    What are your thoughts? Is my initial gut feel to go with the Rem the right one?

    Thanks for any input and ideas.

    A great and blessed Easter to you all.

    WL
    (South Africa)
     
  2. D B Cooper

    D B Cooper Member

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    I would go for the Sako every time. Remingtons are accurate and the actions are a great base for a custom, but the quality of the Sako is far and away superior. They are in a class that is unequaled IMO.

    Here are my two favorite rifles. Both are old time customs built by an old one legged logger here in Oregon named Ed Plummer(deceased). They aren't the synthetic stocked, camo'ed all weather super-dooper's that everyone seems to think are the latest and greatest, but I would shoot them gun for gun against anything on the market.

    Ed guaranteed his rifles to shoot MOA or your money back. I don't think he ever had to follow through on it. He couldn't checker so he "stagged" them.

    Top is a Forester in .243 Win. Bottom is L61R Finnbear in .300 Win. Mag. "Plummer" customs are becoming highly prized by those who know what they are when they see them. And command a premium when they turn up at local shops. These two rifles will be with me until either they turn to dust, or I do. I love the early Sakos.



    [​IMG]
     
    Last edited: Mar 20, 2008

  3. P KUNDA

    P KUNDA Well-Known Member

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    Remington

    Give me a Remington anytime. May not be as fancy as the Sako but much safer. If your case will ever fail, you will know exactly what I'm talking about.

    Peter
     
  4. D B Cooper

    D B Cooper Member

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    So how's a Remnington any safer than Sako, Mauser or any other modern rifle? Please follow through on your statement.
     
    Last edited: Mar 20, 2008
  5. D B Cooper

    D B Cooper Member

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    I am assuming that you are referring to the so called "Extractor failing and becoming shrapnel" legend. In relation to that , Frank de Haas states in his Bolt Action Rifle book , "I have never seen a Sako action that failed in any way, or developed excess headspace after long use."

    I knew the late custom rifle builder Larry Brace personally. Larry used Sako actions almost exclusively to build his exquisit custom rifles. His personal favorite for his many trips to Africa was an L61R in .375 H&H. His wife's rifle was the same action in .270 Win. There was absolutely nothing that he dis-liked or mis-trusted about Sako actions and rifles.

    I have seen many Remington 700s with excessive headspace and with up-set locking lugs. Not to mention worn out extractors.

    I suppose this gentleman could build his .243 AI on the 1917 Enfield to circumvent any perceived or imagined failures of the action.

    BTW, I also did an extensive search to find anyone who had seen first hand, or experienced the alleged Sako Extractor failure. All I found was speculation and hear-say. So if you have first hand experience? I would very much like to hear a detailed account.
     
    Last edited: Mar 21, 2008
  6. jwp475

    jwp475 Well-Known Member

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    Yea know what you are talking about. A Remington will give the shooter a face full the same as the Sako will when a case ruptures catastropicaly
     
  7. P KUNDA

    P KUNDA Well-Known Member

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    A case head fully closed in three rings of steel will always give one much more protection than a case head in one extractor interupted rim. The amount of gas comming through with the Remington action is nothing to compare with what can happen with some other not so well sealed actions. Friend of mine has 20 stitches in his forearm resulted from a .270W Sako case head failure, blowing the stock forearm into hundred splinters.

    Peter
     
    Last edited: Mar 25, 2008
  8. D B Cooper

    D B Cooper Member

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    That sounds more like a detonation, overload or obstruction rather than a simple case failure or primer failure. I don't under stand how a case failure could blow the forend to pieces. I examined a Tikka T3 in 300 WM that suffered from a catostrophic case failure (complete and violent head separation). It locked up the bolt and damaged the chamber, but no other visible damage.
     
    Last edited: Mar 22, 2008
  9. boomtube

    boomtube Well-Known Member

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    I am a fan of Remington 700s but if I had a choice of making a new rig based on that action vs. an old Sako I'd go drop the Remington like a hot potato. Remmies are good, old Sakos are better. And anything can be blown up by a determined fool.
     
  10. LRHWAL

    LRHWAL Well-Known Member

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    Thanks for the replies.

    Whilst I hear the arguments about safety of the actions, I tend to feel that for my purposes most modern actions treated sanely will be "good enough".

    My questions are just about whether the Sako will provide a good accurate base rifle for the build, or whether a squared up Rem 700 will be better. I do know that aftermarket parts to trick up the Rem are far easier available. I thought about it quite a bit the weekend and was leaning towards the Rem because of the ability to do that. But I too am a fan of those smooth Sako actions... but I'm probably no closer to deciding! :)
     
  11. LRHWAL

    LRHWAL Well-Known Member

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    Still can't decide!

    Thanks for the replies.

    Whilst I hear the arguments about safety of the actions, I tend to feel that for my purposes most modern actions treated sanely will be "good enough".

    My questions are just about whether the Sako will provide a good accurate base rifle for the build, or whether a squared up Rem 700 will be better. I do know that aftermarket parts to trick up the Rem are far easier available. I thought about it quite a bit the weekend and was leaning towards the Rem because of the ability to do that. But I too am a fan of those smooth Sako actions... but I'm probably no closer to deciding! :)
     
  12. P KUNDA

    P KUNDA Well-Known Member

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    I know your feelings

    ,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,

    Fully trued Remington will be hard to beat, there are more aftermarkets for the Remi also. Even thought the Remi is safer due to the three rings of steel bolt nose/barrel/receiver the Sako is a good action. To get the most out of the Sako full truing will be required. As I've seen two close friends Sakos after a blow up (.243W-.270W) I wouldn't have one myself. Whatever was the reason for the blow ups is only academic, if you have a puncured tyre it doesn't matter if it was a nail or a bolt or a glass. Keep deciding.

    Peter
     
  13. Gene

    Gene Well-Known Member

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    I have many Sakos and luv em all; but the Remington round action is easier to bed. I have done both, and the square Sako action is a bit more troublesome for me. Plus, there are an endless supply of Remmy parts available; not so with Sako. You choose.
     
  14. uncleB

    uncleB Well-Known Member

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    I have several Sako's even the one in question an L579, I also have more than several model 700's and I like them both. If I have a custom gun project that I want less than 1-1 1/2 pound trigger then I lean toward the 700 because I can put a Jewell trigger on it. McMillan and other stock makers make stocks for either, the Sako might be a bit harder to bed but a competent gunsmith can do either with out being a big deal.
    If I could find a Sako L579 in good condition I would buy it because it was made at least 30 years ago and I might not find another.
    As far as strength of the action, I think PKunda's claims are bias either will suit needs just fine.
    UB