Reloading

Discussion in 'Reloading' started by D Scott, Jul 1, 2011.

  1. D Scott

    D Scott Well-Known Member

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    I'm just getting started in reloading,I have been shooting several years mostly target and coyotes but wanted to start making my own. I bought an RCBS kit and some of the brass prep tools, I have a few questions about some stuff I thought I would shoot out there. I have a digital caliper (hornaday) is there a need for an actual micrometer for reloading? also is there a real need to turn the necks on the brass for a factory rifle? I have a remm 700 22-250. My first batch of ammo using nosler 55 gr ball tips was a 1/4 by 1/4 of an inch at 50yrds, just wanted to see if everything worked. also is there any need for a concentricity tool? or just best to turn the cartridge as seating the bullet (I have RCBS dies) thanks !
     
  2. boomtube

    boomtube Well-Known Member

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    "..is there a need for an actual micrometer for reloading?"

    Micrometer can be interesting to use but it's certainly not mandatory.


    "..also is there a real need to turn the necks on the brass for a factory rifle?"

    No, not normally. Passed a certain point turning only makes an already poor chamber fit worse.


    " ..also is there any need for a concentricity tool?"

    Need is a strong word; not many people have one so it sure isn't needed. Unless you're getting groups smaller than maybe .75 moa turning isn't likely to do a thing for you.


    "best to turn the cartridge as seating the bullet"

    I have a concentricity tool and I've never been able to see any benefit to turiing a case during seating. If a bullet starts off-axis it tends to stay that way.
     

  3. Mikecr

    Mikecr Well-Known Member

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    I wouldn't be concerned about the little extras until you've successfully worked past basic reloading, load development, and read enough books to head a particular direction.
    While doing so, you can search this forum and others for unlimited information really.

    Books I'm compelled to recommend; 'Handloading for competition', and 'Precision Shooting Reloading Guide'
    Amazon.com: handloading for competition
    These explain both the basics and all the little extras

    Another excellent tool: QuickLoad software
    NECO moly plating bullets,firelapping,ballistic software and chronographs
    With this, you can forever stop buying reloading manuals.

    And for the best one stop reloading tool shopping: Sinclair
    Top Rated Supplier of Firearm Reloading Equipment, Supplies, and Tools - Sinclair Intl
     
  4. J E Custom

    J E Custom Well-Known Member

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    If you are just getting started keep it simple.

    Learn all of the basic steps and after a while then you can start refining your re loading skills.

    Also find a quite place and only have one component out at a time.(Bullets,powder, primers
    and brass to be loaded.

    J E CUSTOM
     
  5. WyoElk2Hunt

    WyoElk2Hunt Well-Known Member

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    I agree with JECustom until you get into advanced loading or start having problems keep the reloading simple and enjoy the sport. Alot of the precision items come when you really get into competition and weighing brass and bullets etc are more important.
     
  6. diriel

    diriel Well-Known Member

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    Yeah, keep it simple. For instance, I don't even listen to music, much less have a TV *ANYWHERE* near me when i am reloading. No distractions. As JE said, do one operation at a time, complete it and verify it, then move to the next. Consistency, and good record keeping are they keys to quality reloads. By the way, one of the most common mistakes I have seen over the years is the desire to Hot Rod... don't do it! If your set up wont get you to the yardage with the drop and drift you want, get a bigger gun. :)

    As for the brass, yes part of the Magic is in brass prep. A short cut on brass is to use Lapua. If you insist on doing it the hardway, measure neck thickness. If the necks are not consistent, then you can neck trim, but remember, less is more!! Do not get too zealous when trimming brass. Primer holes can also be checked for bur's, but for the sake of sanity and precision if you do decide to de-burr the holes, get a good tool and go *VERY* sparingly!!! When messing with a flashole Less Is More !! You can utterly ruin a perfectly fine piece of brass by getting mid-evil on the flashole. If you really want to get tricky, you can sort by case volume as well, but unless you are going for world records or something, that is probably a little excessive, as long as you use brass of the same make, year, ect..

    Hope that didn't come off as preaching, but, been there done that got the tee-shirt!
    Good Shooting!
    Gary
     
    Last edited: Jul 2, 2011
  7. D Scott

    D Scott Well-Known Member

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    Everyone, thank you for the feedback, it has been very helpful , sorry for all the newbie questions.
    Today at 100 yards the same load did about 5/8 's of an inch, and at 300 yards was 3 and 1/4 inch horizontal x 1 inch vertical, should I expect any better from my factory rifle? In which order should I experiment with the variables ? powder? bullet type, or weight ? distance from the rifling? out here in central oregon its windy all the time so I wanted to use as heavy a load (55 Gr 22-250)as the barrel could spin thanks again Scott

    also, my reload kit came with the 505 scale it seems to work well, are the digital scales all they say they are or should one chasing accuracy just stay with a beam scale? anyone have any favorites?
     
  8. diriel

    diriel Well-Known Member

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    Friends don't let friends get digital scales! I do own a couple of them, but I only use them for weighing brass and that kind of thing. When weighing brass, within about a full grain or so is usually more than good enough most of the time. Besides, it is more important to check actual case capacity than to Just Weight Sort. By the time you invest enough time, money, and energy into getting a *GOOD* set of digital scales, you could have invested in a new barrel for your rifle and perhaps have had money left over towards a scope.
    Now, I am sure there are some folks who swear by digital scales. I mainly swear at them. Buyer be ware.

    Have a good one,
    Gary
     
  9. D Scott

    D Scott Well-Known Member

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    Thanks Gary, yes if the beam works the money will be going to a savage 260 :)
     
  10. WyoElk2Hunt

    WyoElk2Hunt Well-Known Member

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    I am one of those guys that like digital scales and think they work great for powder measuring but I am old and eye site failing for beam center. I think it is faster for me than a beam scale.
     
  11. diriel

    diriel Well-Known Member

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    perhaps in the last couple years the newest gen of digital have got more consistent. They are faster, I grant that..sorta... With mine, I have checked them against both a redding and an rcbs 1010 and the digital was never better than about .3 or so... I am anal about my loads, 3 tenths may as well be chuckin rocks at them! :)
    Hey, if it works though, and you are having good luck with it than that is great.

    Have a good one,
    Gary
     
  12. J E Custom

    J E Custom Well-Known Member

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    I am on the fence on this one (Digital or balance scales).

    I have and use both and they both have there strengths and weaknesses.

    The beam scale is very consistant as long as you Zero it each time before you use it with
    the weights provided.(Don't assume that it will always be dead on).

    The Digital scales are faster than the beam scales and I use them most of the time to weigh
    cases and bullets.

    The Charge master powder measure uses a digital scale and if I'm going to use it I weigh
    A charge and then adjust the weight to match the load data weight developed using a
    beam scale.(The adjusted weight may not be the same numbers but actual powder charge
    will be identical) .

    I find that most digital scales do not allways agree with the beam scale by a few 10ths of a grain
    so I use my beam scale as a "Gold Standard" to work off of. This does not mean that the beam
    scale Is perfectly accurate at any weight, is is just very repeatable if set up correctly.(And I trust
    gravity better than electronics).

    Which is best? I don't know, but I am very comfortable with my use of both types and will stay with
    both until such time that I have 100% confidence in the digital.

    J E CUSTOM
     
  13. diriel

    diriel Well-Known Member

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    +1 to what JE said. I just thought about one gotcha on a beam scale, if you have a ceiling fan or A/C ect that creates air movement, it can make your beam scale bounce around and give bad readings. I would imagine same goes for digital. So for me, I turn my ceiling fan off or down to low setting and make sure my A/C is blowing away from my reloading station.

    Gary
     
  14. D Scott

    D Scott Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    94
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    Jul 1, 2011
    Everyone, thank you for the feedback, it has been very helpful , sorry for all the newbie questions.
    Today at 100 yards the same load did about 5/8 's of an inch, and at 300 yards was 3 and 1/4 inch horizontal x 1 inch vertical, should I expect any better from my factory rifle? In which order should I experiment with the variables ? powder? bullet type, or weight ? distance from the rifling? out here in central oregon its windy all the time so I wanted to use as heavy a load (55 Gr 22-250)as the barrel could spin thanks again Scott