Reloading

Discussion in 'Reloading' started by Cricket, Mar 23, 2013.

  1. Cricket

    Cricket Well-Known Member

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    Hi I want to start reloading for my .300 wby and .375 h&h I never did it before what brand do you recommend and is it very hard to do thanks in advance
     
  2. Cricket

    Cricket Well-Known Member

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    Maybe someone will help if I told you all I was 19 yrs old someone's got to feel sry for me
     

  3. metalhead

    metalhead Well-Known Member

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    Is it hard? No. But can be dangerous. You are, in a nutshell, making a grenade. You need to pay attention to detail and always double check your data and work. The best advice I can give is to get a reloading manual and read it. Better yet, try and find someone in your area who reloads and see if they'll mentor you.

    RCBS, Lee, lyman, Hornady, Redding, etc......They're all good. Start with the basics and add things as your need/wants determine.
     
  4. Cricket

    Cricket Well-Known Member

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    I do thank you for the replie as we speak I am ordering a book on how to get started I will keep you all updated on my success
     
  5. metalhead

    metalhead Well-Known Member

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    Sounds good.
     
  6. Mark611

    Mark611 Well-Known Member

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    LOL!!! good one!:) I would start by buying some good manuals from Sierra and Hornady, Nosler or Speer, and get a good understanding of what reloading is all about! as said safety safety safety first! your putting together a controled explosion! and your full attention must be on what your doing!:D
     
  7. boomtube

    boomtube Well-Known Member

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    "...if I told you all I was 19 yrs old someone's got to feel sry for me >

    Cricket, I'll talk to you like you're one of my grandsons; I feel sorry for you. I was 19 once too. The most encouraging thing I can say is it won't last long and you'll be over it and you'll never have to do it again! :D If reloading was hard, few who do it could do it. It obviously can be dangerous but if you follow instructions and pay attention to your work you'll be as safe as any of us!

    This won't be the warm fuzzy assurace about brands you would like but it's mostly those with little experience who are hung up on brands of reloading tools; old hands know the limiting factor in the quality of our ammo is our own skill, not the color of the tools you use. Fact is, all our makers provide excellant tools and if used correctly your rifle will never have a clue what brand you're using.

    Best type of press for a noob is a conventional single stage and most of us stay with that forever. For large case rifle cartridges like your's, a steel/iron press like Lee's Classic Cast, Lyman's Crusher, RCBS Rock Chucker, Redding's Boss are excellant. All of them are equally strong and very well made. Actually, Lee's CC is the best deal because of it's excellant user features and great priming and clean de-priming system.

    You don't have bench rifles and you aren't a bench competitor so costly dies would gain you nothing at all. Get Lee Delux die sets and you'll have both a full length resize die and a neck size die - if you ever even want to try neck sizing - plus a very good seater and a "free" shell holder.

    Consider a beam scale like the lower priced RCBS or Dillon. And get a Redding or Hornady powder trickler to bring your charges to weight on the scale pan.

    You will likely use coarse grained tubular powders and Lee's inexpensive little Perfect Powder Measure is about as good as they get for coarse powders.

    A case tumbler is a luxury for cosmetics. IF you want one, get a Berry's/Cabelas'/Grafs' (all are the same tool) for the best unit and at a very good price. The type of tumbling media you may choose - cob or nut - really won't matter.

    A 6" steel dial caliper is all a reloader needs for measuring stuff. Harbor Freight Tools have a good one for $10-12 when on sale, as they often are in Am. Rifleman and other men's magizines.

    Beware those who will recommend that you need to buy the same tools they like, your need won't be the same as theirs. Also ignore the 'you get what you pay for' guys, cost does NOT equate to automatic improvement in anything but a purdy exterior! :cool:
     
  8. Cricket

    Cricket Well-Known Member

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    Boomtube thanks for a very helpful replie
     
  9. lloydsmale

    lloydsmale Well-Known Member

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    for the most part id stick with rcbs stuff. Its good stuff. thre warantee is second to none and if you ever want to sell it to upgrade or if you decide you no longer want to load it will hold its value better then most.
     
  10. 7mm Magnum

    7mm Magnum Well-Known Member

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    The most important thing you can do for yourself is to READ,... and then read some more to fully understand and comprehend what it is your going to be doing!

    Take your time,.. and if there's something is in front of you you don't understand ASK questions from someone who's been doing it for a while. This is not a type of hobby you should be guessing at,... I started reloading back when I was 13 with my father. Started out with 12 ga. shotshells and grew to understand the principles involved. I graduated so to say to metallic reloading on my own using the same basic principles. I've been doing so for some 40+ years now.

    I'm currently reloading for 8 different calibers,.. handgun & rifle alike. Each use the same principle but things vary based on what you will be reloading IE: crimp, no-crimp, etc. There's a vast amount of variables to consider when you reload so don't try "short-cutting" the steps involved.

    Lyman produces a good introduction to re-loading in their manual which will explain a lot to you,.. it's well worth the $$ to pick one up and read and welcome to the world of reloading ammunition! :D
     
  11. old_heli_logger

    old_heli_logger Well-Known Member

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    Excellent advice from boomtube!!!
     
  12. kcebcj

    kcebcj Well-Known Member

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    I also want to emphasize one thing "boomtube" stated. "the limiting factor of our ammo is our own skill" Develop the skills needed and everything else will come to light. Keep the tools simple to begin with and start loading.... it's not brain surgery.